Posts tagged with "Art":

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The Wrong gets online exhibitions right

Art exhibitions tend toward the physical, a fact made no more obvious than by the ever-growing count of international biennials; every year, artists, architects, curators, designers, and all manner of hangers-on set off to Venice or Lisbon or São Paolo or Seoul. Jet fuel is burned, lukewarm Prosecco is drunk. In an era that traffics in data, what might be the digital answer to the brick-and-mortar biennial? The Wrong is perhaps one of the right responses to this question. Founded in 2013 by David Quiles Guilló, the online biennial has showcased thousands of artists as part of its radically open exhibition format. Any artist or curator might submit an exhibition, and The Wrong will continue adding them to its directory until the very last day of the biennial.  Living in an off-the-grid home in Alicante, Spain, Quiles Guilló may seem like an unlikely candidate for running a global biennial of net art, but perhaps this is what best embodies The Wrong: de-centered and democratic by definition, one need not be near any global art center—or have the means to reach it—to participate fully in the exhibition. “The Wrong wants to make it easy for curators and artists to exhibit their work, and for the public to enjoy it,” Quiles Guilló said. “Everything I work toward is to achieve this premise.” He is quick to stress however that The Wrong is not designed in opposition to the IRL biennial. “I believe the wrong is a complement to all the already existing events and biennials, a different experience for curators, for the artists, and for the public.” That said, as infinite as an exhibition like the Venice Biennial might feel, The Wrong has them beat. “It’s so vast there is no way you can visit it all,” Quiles Guilló explained, “which mirrors the infiniteness of the digital space.” Artist (and AN contributor) Alice Bucknell, who is exhibiting as part of the pavilion Too beautiful to be real, noted that in contrast to the Venice Biennale or art fairs, there is a “divergence,” perhaps a positive one, between The Wrong and its physical siblings. “There’s an inherent hierarchy informed by the spatiality in traditional biennials and fairs—it conditions your experience of them whether you notice or not,” she said, adding that most art biennials or fairs also have been run in more or less the same way since their inception. “With The Wrong there’s no hierarchy in terms of how you navigate. There are no central pavilions or national pavilions like Venice, there is no up-and-coming sector like Frieze or Basel. There are no costs.” That said, she pointed out that the exhibitors lean heavily toward Euro-America, though this appears to be improving. The Wrong has also attracted its fair share of showy names over the years amid myriad others, such as Marisa Olson and Elisa Giardina Papa. The Wrong’s official landing page is all text, composing many, many links to its various “pavilions.” Bucknell described this design as a “romantic, quite nostalgic idea of the internet as a digital village where you can travel in any order.” In the age of the infinite scroll and the algorithmically organized news feed, where users spend time on just a handful of monopolizing websites, The Wrong brings pack a long-gone Geocities era of the internet with raw hyperlinks and seemingly infinite discovery. “Media today is consumed almost 100 percent based on algorithms, so you only consume something related to what you consumed yesterday, and it is quite hard to break the spell,” said Quiles Guilló. “The Wrong does not use any algorithms, nor compile data from its visitors, so it is a new opportunity to access art and ideas that are not on your regular online diet.”  The Wrong opens its fourth edition to the public on November 1. To attend the opening party, click “Going” on the Facebook event and start commenting.
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Florence Knoll Bassett's private art collection is going to auction

The art collection of the late Florence Knoll Bassett, the American designer who pioneered mid-century furniture and interiors, will be sold at the auction house Phillips this fall. The collection will reveal how the designer who defined American corporate style during the postwar era decorated her own private homes in New York and Florida. The auction will take place on October 25 and November 14 and features 50 pieces from her collection.  Florence Knoll Bassett founded the self-named furniture company Knoll with her husband Hans Knoll in 1938, but was also the mastermind behind many of the company's iconic pieces. She studied under some of the most prominent modernist architects including Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Walter Gropius, and Marcel Breuer. The close association with the Bauhaus can also be seen in her interiors that dominated the American postwar corporate landscape, with IBM, GM, and CBS included in the roster of Knoll clients.  While Knoll's designs have become ubiquitous across offices and homes, the art collection offers a more intimate look at the late designer's personal life. Like the midcentury modern furniture she became known for, Knoll’s art collection is steeped with the abstract works of her artist peers and friends. According to The New York Times, some of the pieces that can be expected at the auction include Paul Klee’s Der Exkaiser, Rufino Tamayo’s Five Slices of Watermelon, and Morris Louis’s Singing. The private collection features an all-star lineup, including artists Josef Albers, Isamu Noguchi, and Pablo Picasso.  Coincidentally, the tail-end of the Knoll Bassett auction will coincide with the auction of I.M. Pei's collection—the architect passed away at a similar 102 this year, and Christie's will be handling the sale of items from his estate.

American Craft Exposition

ACE 2019 will showcase over 140 artists with one-of-a-kind pieces and museum-quality artwork. A highly competitive juried show, ACE features hand-crafted work in 12 media – baskets, ceramics, fiber decorative, fiber wearable, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper and wood. Proceeds from ACE benefit increased access to mental health services at NorthShore University HealthSystem. These critical funds are raised through Benefit Preview Party tickets, general admission tickets, sponsorships and our voluntary Craft for a Cause program. ACE does not receive a portion of proceeds from artist sales.

American Craft Exposition

ACE 2019 will showcase over 140 artists with one-of-a-kind pieces and museum-quality artwork. A highly competitive juried show, ACE features hand-crafted work in 12 media – baskets, ceramics, fiber decorative, fiber wearable, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper and wood. Proceeds from ACE benefit increased access to mental health services at NorthShore University HealthSystem. These critical funds are raised through Benefit Preview Party tickets, general admission tickets, sponsorships and our voluntary Craft for a Cause program. ACE does not receive a portion of proceeds from artist sales.

American Craft Exposition

ACE 2019 will showcase over 140 artists with one-of-a-kind pieces and museum-quality artwork. A highly competitive juried show, ACE features hand-crafted work in 12 media – baskets, ceramics, fiber decorative, fiber wearable, furniture, glass, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, paper and wood. Proceeds from ACE benefit increased access to mental health services at NorthShore University HealthSystem. These critical funds are raised through Benefit Preview Party tickets, general admission tickets, sponsorships and our voluntary Craft for a Cause program. ACE does not receive a portion of proceeds from artist sales.
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Must-see exhibitions this September

At a loss for all the architecture and design shows on view this fall? AN has rounded up a quick list of must-see exhibitions this month from New York to Chicago, London, and Switzerland. Check them out below and head to one near you: What is radical today? 40 positions on architecture Royal Academy of Arts Burlington House, Piccadilly, Mayfair, London W1J 0BD, U.K. September 6 through November 7, 2019 Spanning the decades between the social uprisings of the 1960s to the present, this free display of boundary-pushing architectural work at the Royal Academy in London brings together 40 architects and collectives, then and now, in a powerful exhibition. The show comments on how architecture can alter lives in times of upheaval and turbulence—as pressures of climate change, violence and complicity continue to permeate the individual existence in society. From groundbreaking 20th-century groups like Archigram to contemporary practitioners like Francis Kéré, the proposed spaces surpass any assumptions of ageism and leave echoes of optimism to face the times. Ragnar Kjartansson: The Visitors  The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston 1001 Bissonnet, Houston, Texas 77005 July 20 through September 22, 2019 On the heels of the Finnish artist’s acceptance of the 2019 Ars Fennica Prize, Kjartansson’s immersive video exhibition The Visitors has landed at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston. The nine-screen video installation is spread throughout several galleries, with each screen centering on an individual musician playing for the camera in a room of the Astor family’s Rokeby Farm House in Hudson, New York. The house, built in 1815, is a fitting backdrop for the artists’ admiration for nostalgia and romanticism in his works and adds a drama and grandeur to the audio and visual experience.  Filmed in one take, the musicians all play individual portions of the same song, but in disparate rooms where they are unable to hear one another. As a viewer in the MFA Houston, one becomes a ‘visitor’ to the house, a witness to a performance that occurs, in totality, only for them.  Chairs Beyond Right & Wrong R & Company 64 White Street New York NY 10013 September 10 through October 19, 2019 This September, both floors of R & Company’s White Street gallery will be encompassed by a retrospective of the chair: a formal object, a consumer product, a springboard for creativity. The assumptions that accompany our idea of what a chair is, or what it can be, are challenged by a group of 50 international artists and designers.  Some of the objects in the show have been created specifically for this exhibition while some were chosen by curator Raquel Cayre for their unique ability to move away from preexisting notions of function and form. “Chairs no longer gravitate toward a table;” said Cayre, “they take on their own meaning.” Alan Karchmer: The Architect’s Photographer The National Building Museum 401 F Street NW Washington, D.C 20001 Opening November 9, 2019 Buildings, like art, are mostly experienced today via their photographs and digital media, as location inhibits in-person interaction for most. The way a photographer captures a building, its angles and elevations, therefore has a profound effect on how the building is seen by the world—and often if it’s seen at all. Sometimes certain images of a building can even become icons in themselves, and people begin to conceptualize of a space in the way the photograph they’ve seen suggests, often surprising visitors when and if they see it in person.  Alan Karchmer has made a name for himself for his ability to capture the essence of a building, the way the architect intended. Working the full spectrum of architectural styles, from soaring works by Calatrava to the quietudes of Tadao Ando, this mid-career exhibition shows us how an artist’s eye can enhance our experience of some of the world’s best spaces. Christian Marclay: 48 War Movies and Screams Paula Cooper Gallery  524 W. 26th Street, New York NY 10001 September 12 through October 19, 2019 Renowned video artist Christian Marclay brings his newest film, 48 War Movies, to America following its debut at the Venice Biennale. On display at Paula Cooper Gallery, the video is a collage of gruesome war footage from the Civil War to Iraq, a cacophony of violence and sound that, when installed at the Biennale, literally bled into adjoining rooms.  The narratives are presented simultaneously through the lens of concentric rectangles on screen. The unflinching presentation of this raw violence sheds new light on how society conventionally handles trauma: the pasted-on smile, the cool facade. Marclay instead offers a continuous scream, an externalization of emotion, and a way of facing our history rather than hiding from it.  All That Is Solid  Chicago Pedway (Chicago Architecture Biennial) August 28 through October 11, 2019 This site-specific intervention by architect and professor Ang Li encourages passersby to reflect on the afterlives of materials. Cubes of expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) that were cleaned and diverted from landfill stand sculpturally arranged, like windows with our everyday disposable food containers pressed up to the panes.  This artificial and hyper-modern material is the tool of choice for the exhibition, as it encourages pedestrians to engage in a series of building experiments. Inspired by industrial inventory-taking practices, the installation offers a reflection on our culture of single-use disposables as well as a more sustainable future.  The Art of Waiting: Gianni Berengo Gardin Photographs Renzo Piano The Italian Cultural Institute New York 686 Park Avenue New York, NY September 10 through October 10, 2019 Italian artist Gianni Berengo Gardin is not an architectural photographer, but his 20-year collaborative effort with renowned architect Renzo Piano has resulted in over 10,000 images that document the progress and process of Piano’s best buildings. Working in a signature slow style, often observing a construction site from morning until night, the collection that has resulted is one that shows the life and building blocks of Renzo’s forms, rather than the limelight of the finished product.  “Gardin has always managed to see and preserve these magical moments that vanish if you don’t capture them,” said Piano. Photographs included in this exhibition have been selected by Gardin himself, a narrative of building evolutions rarely seen by the public.  Topiary Tango  Center for Architecture 536 LaGuardia Place, New York, NY 10012 July 11 through September 14, 2019 In rooms filled with live plants and carpets of green, Stewardson Keefe LeBrun Travel Grant recipient Mark Zlotsky curates a show around the art of sculptural plant trimming, also known as topiary. Inspired by travels through the great gardens of western Europe, Topiary Tango explores the relationship between topiary and architecture, and how the plantings can be seen not as pithy ornamentation, but as a building material.  In this playful yet academically rigorous installation, Zlotsky proposes an architecture that responds to ever-changing contexts and offers a creative solution to enlivening static structures.  Swissness Applied Kunsthaus Glarus Güterschuppen Im Volksgarten, 8750 Glarus, Switzerland September 21 through November 10, 2019 Cofounder of Architecture Office Nicole McIntosh takes cues from her home country of Switzerland in her traveling exhibition Swissness Applied. An examination of the architectural codification of European immigrant town New Glarus, Wisconsin, McIntosh shows drawings and models of the quintessentially “Swiss” styles of architecture that the town grew from, and eventually exploited for touristic gain when facing economic depression in the 50s. Now a thriving tourist attraction, New Glarus instituted rules regarding architectural building in the 90s to maintain its unique aesthetic and appeal, but McIntosh proposes new opportunities within the building code to connect modern forms to their integral “Swissness.” Her playful models will be exhibited in celebration of the reopening of the Kunsthaus.
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New Glass Now paints a full picture of contemporary practice at the Corning Museum of Glass

Capturing the zeitgeist of contemporary glass practice, the New Glass Now exhibition at the Corning Museum of Glass brings together work from 100 emerging and established talents across 32 nationalities. Exhibited pieces, ranging from large scale installations to delicate miniatures, were democratically selected based on an open call submissions process by a curatorial committee comprised of leading culture-makers and experts Aric Chen (Design Miami Curatorial Director), Susanne Jøker Johnsen (artist and head of exhibitions at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, Schools of Architecture, Design and Conservation, Denmark), and Beth Lipman (American artist). Susie J. Silbert (Corning Museum of Glass Curator of Modern and Contemporary Glass) headed up the jury and exhibition curation. Addressing relevant themes such as gender inequity and environmental degradation, the highly-curated exhibition reveals what glass can achieve through various expressive and conceptual interpretations, as well as new translations of age-old techniques like flameworking, glassblowing, and casting. Exhibition sections :in situ, :(infra)structures, :body politics, :embodied knowledge, :011001111 01101100 01110011, and :phenomena incorporate works that transcend disciplinary conventions. On view are sculptures, functional objects, photographs, videos, technological speculations, scientific experiments, architectural maquettes, and full-scale mockups. Through various strategic stagings, Silbert sought to establish sharp dialogues between different, seemingly unrelated, works. Fredrik Nielsen's "macho" I was here installation sits in the direct vicinity of Deborah Czeresko's emphatically feminist Meat Chandelier sculpture, a piece very similar to the final work she created during the Corning Museum of Glass-supported Netflix competition series Blown Away Pieces such as Liquid Sunshine / I am a Pluviophile by Japanese artist Rui Sasaki reveals how glass can be implemented in expressing conceptual meaning, while Smokey Comet Installation I by Toots Zynsky challenges the perception of what the medium can physically achieve. The Bahá'í Temple of South America project by Jeff Goodman, and Crystal Houses (Chanel Flagship Store) by MVRDV showcase glass's potential in an architectural application. Reservoir by C. Matthew Szösz and Promise by Nadège Desgenétez demonstrate how far the material properties of glass can be pushed. Other notable artists, designers, and outright creatives represented in this comprehensive survey include Miya Ando, Atelier NL, Ans Bakker, the Bouroullec Brothers, Monica Bonvicini, Mathew Day Perez, Martino Gamper, Katherine Gray, Jochen Holz, Helen Le, Erwin Wurm, Dustin Yellin, Dafna Kaffeman, Bohyun Yoon, and Mark Zirpel. The main show is joined by New Glass Now | Context, an annex exhibit that explores the changing nature of glass-specific curation through the history of two past iterations of the New Glass exhibition series, in 1959 and 1979. Historic documentation, period-specific works, and related ephemera are displayed in the Corning Museum of Glass's Rakow Research Library and collectively reveal some clear differences in terms of method and focus but also socio-political and cultural influences.
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New York's 200-year-old National Academy of Design won't ever reopen

America’s oldest artist-advocacy organization, the National Academy of Design, has decided to permanently close its museum operations. The Beaux-Arts mansion at 1083 Fifth Avenue on the Upper East Side has been sold, and the institution is reinventing itself with an endowment. Run by artists for artists since 1825, the Academy is comprised of invite-only members, a whos-who list of many of the biggest names in American art. For most of the institution’s history, each member was also required to donate to the Academy’s collection, meaning that the NAD has pieces by American greats like Robert Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, and Thomas Eakins. This collection made for groundbreaking shows that produced world-class art historical scholarship. But what about the living members?  Previously, the academy had been aligned with both its own museum as well as a well-respected art school, but now the NAD has now cut ties with both. “The museum and school were draining all the resources," Walter Chatham told the Art Newspaper. An architect who has served as co-chair of the Board of Governors since 2014, Chatham added, "There wasn’t any money for the programs that would actually improve the academicians’ lives. Eventually we want to get back into education and exhibitions, but I don’t think we’re going to have a museum again.”  The museum debate came to a head with the sale of two Hudson River School masterpieces, prompting condemnations and sanctions from national museum organizations like the Association of Art Museum Directions and the American Alliance of Museums. Brian T. Allen, an art historian writing for the National Review, said, “I was a member of both and supported the sanctions. My museum wouldn’t lend work to NAD shows. In retrospect, I think the penalties did the NAD a disservice.” Unlike the sale of the paintings, the sale of the Academy’s three Upper East Side buildings leaves them with an enduring source of income—a legally restricted $66 million endowment to put towards operations that will prioritize the current academicians and living artists as the center of the Academy’s mission. The refreshed focus will hopefully help the institution that has long grappled with the "existential" question of its inherent museum-ness. The "class" of 2018 includes artists Mel Chin, Njideka Akunyili Crosby, and Vik Muniz, who will join the over 400 other living members. Refocusing their efforts on the class of living artists isn't the only initiative for the "new" NAD, as the academy has also begun publication of an online journal, NAD Now, which features fresh writing focused on the art and scholarship of members both past and present. The National Academy of Design is a storied and historic institution that is emerging once again for the 21st century, and, following in the footsteps of many other renowned arts institutions making the move out of increasingly expensive Manhattan. For example, take SculptureCenter, which sold its longtime home on the Upper East Side in order to “reinvent” itself in Long Island City, Queens, and continues to thrive. These changes are difficult for a time-honored institution’s legacy. However, in the words of Allen, “I say ‘Welcome back,’ and hope my colleagues in the American art world will do the same.”
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Keris Salmon explores the Architecture of Slavery

“When I arrived there I was a journalist. And when I left on that very same day I became an artist,” said Keris Salmon, an African-American visual artist, describing her visit to a plantation that her white husband’s family had owned for over 100 years. “I couldn't leave without making something out of it.” What she made out of it was a print portfolio titled We Have Made These Lands What They Are: The Architecture of Slavery, a collection of 18 prints that were displayed as part of Pulled In Brooklyn at the International Print Center in New York City, which ran through June 15. Keris has since visited dozens of plantations across the American South, and taken photographs of the structures that remain, from the rough wooden siding of former slave cabins to the lace curtains of the “big houses” built with clay bricks by the slaves who lived there. Salmon, a television journalist-by-training who had worked for NBC, ABC, and PBS before turning towards art, has done her research. The many stories, historical figures, and writings that she has unearthed reveal the secrecy and complexity of the slave era in America, secrets and complexes that are still pervasive today. The exhibition’s title was derived from a real-life encounter between a group of former slaves running back to their plantation after emancipation, and a group of white people observing and asking, why? In the words of Salmon, “they responded nearly in unison, ‘we made these lands what they are.’” Salmon’s work explores the expansive truth behind this phrase, revealing how America as a country was both physically and theoretically built by slavery, and how both positive and negative impacts remain, unflinching, within American society today. Salmon has collected her photographs and snippets of text from historical documents and visits to dozens of plantations across the American South, and the resulting combinations of visuals and printed text express the pedestrian elements of slavery, rather than the shackles, whips, and leg braces of the horror stories. When asked why in an interview by PBS reporter Duarte Geraldino, Salmon replied, “Life then was very pedestrian,” with segregated norms made up of the plantation architecture, furniture, period lace curtains, “the kind of thing[s] that people encountered every day, black and white.” Her texts are presented in a custom-designed typeface; the artist worked with Brooklyn-based printmakers Peter Kruty and Sayre Gaydos to create a visual language that focuses on the font’s significance without “hitting you over the head with it,” according to Gaydos. Resembling the lettering styles used for runaway slave and auction posters at the time, Salmon’s type spells out a different kind of story. While the “architecture” that Salmon is referring to in her title is not explicitly that of the built environment, her work asserts the concept of slavery being the structure that America is built on. National political issues from unequal educational opportunities to mass incarceration are systems that remain today, just as the plantation houses and clusters of slave cabins in Salmon’s photographs remain. The Architecture of Slavery reminds us of the many deep connections between the history of race in America and the present moment.
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Artists turn cable trays into snaking installation

The New York–based artists Eva and Franco Mattes have a practice that focuses exclusively on the effect that the internet has on our daily life. They claim to devote “their waking hours almost exclusively to exploring this platform —its possibilities, pitfalls, and implications for the creation and dissemination of content and data.” In their current exhibition Data Doubles at the Team (Bungalow) Gallery in Venice, California, the duo has spatialized or, in their words, “concretized” the physical infrastructure of the internet by installing a network of cable trays or “exostructure” throughout the gallery house. These modular units of lightweight sheet steel are traditionally joined together and hung from a ceiling to join or hide the cacophony of wires that otherwise snake across desks and avenues of travel in an office workspace. Here they are in our face at eye level and below, circumnavigating the indoor and outdoor spaces of the site. A cute addition to the exhibit is a taxidermy cat peeking through a hole in the ceiling, a direct interpretation of the meme Ceiling Cat, which surged in popularity from 2006 onwards concomitant with the lolcat phenomenon. We are being watched or even monitored! The installation makes clear, if it were not already, how powerful our lived space merges today with the virtual space of technology and the internet. Finally, is it really important to actually visit the gallery or is it enough to simply see it in this review? I am writing this review from New York without actually visiting the gallery. But the images are so seductive they take me there via the internet to the Venice bungalow. Data Doubles Eva & Franco Mattes Team Gallery May 12 – June 23, 2019 306 Windward Avenue, Venice, California

The Soane Foundation and The Olana Partnership present The Global Grand Tour

This lecture examines the Grand Tour as a site of origin for the Picturesque, the aesthetic category that would come to dominate landscape representation in Britain by about 1800. It offers a link between the European grand tour and that made by Joseph Banks and James Cook – a world tour. It also highlights Frederic Church as both an artist and world traveler. The lecture moves on to make the unusual claim that we can trace a range of similarities between paintings made by British artists in Italy, and those made after 1788 by a less privileged category of image-makers – the prisoners held in the British prison colonies of Australia, who produced an distinctive, antipodean form of Picturesque landscape. The lecture concludes by arguing that global grand tours of American painter Frederic Edwin Church continued this tradition and brought it to a climax. Tim Barringer is Paul Mellon Professor of the History of Art at Yale University. He specializes in the eighteenth-, nineteenth- and twentieth-century art of Britain and the British Empire, nineteenth-century American and German art and museum studies.
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Artists' housing in downtown Phoenix might (literally) elevate the Airstream

Public design review on the project has yet to start, but it looks like downtown Phoenix’s Roosevelt Row could be getting bohemian-style artists housing courtesy of national firm Shepley Bulfinch. By suspending chrome Airstream trailers within a diamond-shaped scaffolding, developer True North Studio, artist Wayne Rainey, and Shepley Bulfinch hope that the four-story Roosevelt Land Yacht Club will supply up to 30 units of affordable housing for local artists. Rather than acting as a standalone building, the project presents a novel type of urban infill; the Roosevelt Land Yacht Club will wrap around the exterior of an existing corner parking garage and fill in the 15-foot gap between the building and the sidewalk. Each trailer—the Airstreams may have to be replaced with a less iconic model—will feature about 350 square feet of living space. The multilevel steel matrix will be constantly painted over by the artists to create a structure that’s half living space, half piece of art. The diamond motif and airy framing reference both rolling desert dunes as well as the sense of freedom brought on by the open road. Of course, this is all speculative at the moment. True North Studio expects that the design review and permitting process with the city of Phoenix will take approximately six months, and hopes to break ground in 2020. While no rent information has been released yet, making it unclear how affordable the spaces will be, the scheme could still create a new precedent for infill housing if it moves ahead. The Roosevelt Land Yacht Club is part of the much larger, multi-building mixed-use renovation titled Ro2. True North Studio is handling the entire project after being selected through a request for proposal issued by the city of Phoenix, but, as the Phoenix New Times noted, it was also the only developer to submit a proposal.