Posts tagged with "Arik Levy":

Placeholder Alt Text

MIPIM Day Two: Modeling and mapping the Responsive City

MIPIM takes place in the most complicated, counterintuitive series of convention halls on the Mediterranean waterfront. In trying to find the basement registration hall I ran into Ben Van Berkel who tried to help, but was having his own problems finding the ‘innovation forum’ that is the center of the architecture presentations. He claims he attends every other year because he can meet, in two days, 15 to 20 old and potential new clients. In the forum, we heard HOK present their Responsive Cities project that mines municipal data and then expresses it in maps that can be used by architects to drop future projects into and understand how they interact with the existing city. They showed a HOK sports stadium that might then become a useable bridge and public space during the day when it is not used for sports events. Speaking of models, MIPIM has a collection of the most fantastic scale models of cities like London and Istanbul that are enough of a reason for the design press to come to this event. This technical forum then morphed into a talk by Arik Levy, the Israeli/French designer who showed how to create value through the placements of art in projects and also bring culture to the places where working people spend their days. The forum was sponsored by Vitra, and they used their famous Swiss campus as an example of high design to super-charge daily life. We also met with Asudio, a young firm of ex-Foster employees who started up during an economic downturn and were able to get a series of schools projects that taught them to work efficiently and on-budget to produce impressive low-budget public work. They have also just started a new venture '63,000 Homes' that they hope can steer clients into creating work with innovative plans, uses, and architecture Asudio showed a new project that was meant to be a single commercial building, but they convinced the client to create two buildings that used a heat exchanger to transfer the daytime heat generated for the commercial space to heat the residential spaces when they needed the warmth during the day. There seem to be no end of the high technological solutions to everyday urban problems here at MIPIM. More tomorrow.
Placeholder Alt Text

On View> Arik Levy reflects on design with his new exhibit at Los Angeles’ Please Do Not Enter gallery

The announcement for Arik Levy: Intimate Formations, the inaugural exhibition at Please Do Not Enter that just opened in Downtown Los Angeles, reads Levy is an “artist, technician, photographer, designer, video artist.” The multidisciplinary list begs the question: How does anyone operate across so many practices? Does Levy flip a switch from “designer” when he’s working on furniture, lighting, and interiors, to “artist” when he’s working on sculptures and paintings? “I separate them,” Levy said, taking a moment to talk amid artwork and wooden crates in various stages of unpacking and installation. “When I make a chair, I make a chair. When I make a sculpture, I make a sculpture.” The distinction between these disciplines is apparent to him, and it’s a defining characteristic of how he identifies his practice.“I don’t know many other people who operate or work this way,” he said. “But one enriches the other. But when I make a painting I know it’s not graphic design, and when I make a logo I don’t pretend to make a painting. So I’m not here or there.” His first West Coast solo exhibition, Intimate Formations, installed at the small gallery and storefront in Downtown Los Angeles is comprised of 25 works, including freestanding and wall-mounted pieces, large-scale sculptures, neon sculptures, and paintings. Born in Israel, trained as an industrial designer in Switzerland, and operating out of Paris, Levy said the works on view, which make use of reflective surfaces and abstracted geometrical structures, emerge from an exploration of social sciences, genetic sciences, and biology. Still, Levy acknowledges that his background in design plays a role in the formal outcomes of his work. “The culture of design has brought a lot of perfection into the artwork because I understand engineering,” he said. “I understand packing. I understand logistics.” Coming off the flurry of attention that Please Do Not Enter generated last month when it presented Vincent Lamouroux’s seemingly made-for-social-media installation, Projection, which covered a vacant Sunset Boulevard motel in a whitewash of lime, Intimate Formations continues the discussion about the spaces that mediate art’s interaction with the public. If Lamouroux’s Projection was about bringing a gallery experience outdoors, Intimate Formations is exactly the opposite. “We brought what is almost a public art piece inside the gallery, inside a closed space,” said gallery co-founder Nicolas Libert, discussing how large-scale outdoor work from Levy’s RockGrowth series found its way into a small new storefront space on Olive Street across from Pershing Square. Inside the gallery, Levy’s pieces take on architectural ideas: transparency, framing, and the thresholds between interior and exterior. “These reflecting pieces play with the surroundings, and reveals what’s around,” Libert said about Levy’s work. "It’s amazing for people to interact with the artworks.” For Levy, the public’s reaction to the work is another opportunity to draw a distinction between his practice as a designer and his practice as an artist. “In contrary to the design business, in art, I don’t know if a piece will be or will not be successful,” he said. “Will it be appreciated intellectually, emotionally, or will somebody buy it?” “It’s all unknown.” Arik Levy: Intimate Formations is on view through July 11, 2015 at Please Do Not Enter, 549 South Olive Street, Los Angeles.
Placeholder Alt Text

Product> Brilliant Concepts: Six Light Fixtures that Do More than Illuminate

Merging practicality—ingenuity, even—with aesthetics can yield impressive results. These light fixtures and accessories go beyond the basic function of illuminating a space in some very surprising ways. Pétale Luceplan This innovative, sound-absorbing suspension lamp combines technology and elegance, ultimately enhancing the true nature of the product: silence. Designed by architect Odile Decq, Pétale has an ethereal presence, thanks to its organic form and soft diffused light that filters through a white fabric cover. It contains a sound-absorbing panel that makes it perfect for large spaces that require high-quality acoustics. GATICA Tech Lighting Named for its uniquely flexible features (GATICA = General And Task Illumination, Controls, Adjustability), this modular LED lighting system combines aimable general illumination, wall wash, and aimable spot lighting all in a highly configurable, ultra-thin profile. GATICA's highly configurable components, quiet beauty, and light performance make it ideal for retail, grocery, office, healthcare, hospitality, museum, library, and gallery applications. It can serve as the sole or majority light source throughout spaces requiring general illumination, wall-washing, task illumination, or all three. Vesuvius ILEX In this elegant, unusual ceiling fixture, a polished, spun-aluminum shade surrounds a hammered metal baffle that is finished in Architectural Bronze or Polished Nickel. The inside of the baffle is brushed brass, which imparts a warm glow both upwards and downwards. Designed by Kevin Walz. Hubbardton Forge Line, Adorne Collection Legrand These hand-crafted, heavily textured metal wall plates coordinate with select Hubbardton Forge fixtures. In six finishes: Black, Natural Iron, Mahogany, Dark Smoke, Burnished Steel, and Bronze. SnapRays Guidelight SnapPower No batteries or hardwiring required: Patented metal prongs on the back of the faceplate make contact with the screws on the outlet, and draw power to the unit’s integral, sensor-operated, LED nightlights. Wireflow Vibia The electrical wires of this updated, abstracted chandelier can be adjusted to trace geometries in two and three dimensions, allowing a great variety of sizes and forms to be created. Designed by Arik Levy.