Posts tagged with "Architecture":

Placeholder Alt Text

AIA New York’s New Practices Committee Chooses Six Emerging Firms as Winners

New Practices New York, a distinguished competition that’s part of the AIA New York chapter, announced the six winners of its 2016 biennial competition on January 28. To qualify, the practices had to be located within New York City and founded since 2006; the competition was open to multidisciplinary firms, widening the talent pool. The winners are MODU, SCHAUM/SHIEH, stpmj, Studio Cadena, Taller KEN, and Young Projects. The panel of jurors selected the winners from 53 entries, the members are William Menking, AN’s editor-in-chief, Julian Rose, principal of Formlessfinder, Jane Smith, partner at Spacesmith, Martino Stierli, Philip Johnson chief curator of architecture and design at MoMA, and Ada Tolla, partner at LOT-EK. This year’s theme was Prospect and the jury evaluated the firms based on their ability to leverage multiple aspects of their projects and practices and the architecture profession as a whole. The firms will receive a stipend for an installation and exhibition at the Center for Architecture, which will open May 12, 2016, and will participate in symposia and lectures at the Cosentino Showroom, as well as travel to Spain with underwriter Cosentino. About the winners: MODU Codirected by Phu Hoang and Rachely Rotem, MODU is an interdisciplinary firm that focuses on directing people to their environments. The practice has won numerous awards and was given a commendation for “21 for 21” an award that recognizes “the next generation of architects for the 21st Century.” SCHAUM/SHIEH Founders Rosalyn Shieh and Troy Schaum established their firm in 2009 with an emphasis on the city at the scale of a building and the dialogue between projects and urban plans. They operate between Houston and New York City. stpmj Based in New York and Seoul, Seung Teak Lee and Mi Jung Lim founded their firm to explore new perspectives on material and structure with regard to our current social, cultural, environmental and economic fabric. Studio Cadena Benjamin Cadena founded his eponymous studio in Brooklyn; projects range from city planning and commercial projects to exhibitions, houses, and furniture. Taller KEN Part of the design team for the Whitney Museum of American Art, Gregory Melitonov and Ines Guzman founded their studio in 2013. The New York– and Guatemala-based firm’s work includes mixed-use development, residential projects, and installation design. Young Projects Bryan Young founded multidisciplinary design studio Young Projects in 2010 and projects include a retreat in the Dominican Republic, a townhouse in Williamsburg, and a Hamptons bungalow. The firm received the Architectural League Prize in 2013. The New Practices New York 2016 exhibition will be on view at the Center for Architecture, 536 LaGuardia Place, New York City from May 12, 2016.
Placeholder Alt Text

Move over Bjarke, there’s another ski-slope-topped building in town

While warm weather is expanding across the United States, residents of Kazakhstan are embracing the cold winter weather they are receiving. The residents of Slalom House, a 21-story apartment block in Kazakhstan's capital Astana, may be getting an over-the-top amenity: a 1,000-foot ski slope. Shokhan Mataibekov, an active skier and member of the Union of Architects of Kazakhstan, has made a proposal for the residential ski slope based on the fact that residents don’t have access to a nearby facility. At a price tag of approximately $70 million, the year-round rooftop ski slope would be track mounted and comprised of Snowflex, a synthetic material that mimics the slip and grip of real snow. But, you may be thinking, where have I seen this concept before? Oh, that's right, Danish architect Bjarke Ingels and his firm BIG are designing "the cleanest waste-to-energy plant in the world" in Copenhagen, which is also outfitted with a built-in ski slope and a chimney that releases smoke rings periodically. BIG's plans have been in the works since 2011, and the plant is slated for completion in 2017. The Slalom House was shortlisted in the Future Residential projects category at the World Architecture Festival (WAF) in Singapore in November. The design included space for both retailers and food outlets on the building’s lower half, 421 two-bedroom apartments on the upper half, and a separate entrance outfitted with panoramic elevators that would provide access to the top of the building. The project has been submitted to the city officials and is currently under review.
Placeholder Alt Text

AN 2015 Holiday Gift Guide: 16 design-heavy gifts sure to please everyone on your list

The holidays are quickly approaching, and AN has found the best architecture and design gifts to give (or receive) this season. Here are 16 must-have gifts for everyone on your list. The High Line Phaidon Get the inside scoop behind the inspiration and creation of New York’s notable elevated park, The High Line. This hefty tome includes 50 gatefolds and 570 illustrations. $75 Framed Benhaddou Laser Cut Paper Art Molly M Designs Dress up any office or home with this 16- by-16-inch, 3-D paper art masterpiece made of stacked laser-cut paper and framed with poplar wood. $182 Structo Table Curio Design Equipped with Bluetooth technology and both task and ambient light features, this table lamp will bring a pop of color to any office environment. $250 Mod Tablet 2  This Is Ground A handy carryall case for tablets helps you keep your tablet, phone, pens, stylus, glasses, cards, cash, notebooks, small items, open compartments, and cords organized during travel. It’s available in five colorways and also serves as a soft tablet stand. $299 Arbesser Blankets Hem These warm and snuggly throw blankets come in two patterns: Arch and Stripe. Arch is made of New Zealand wool, and Stripe is comprised of 100 percent New Zealand lambswool. Both come in four unique colorways. $120-$150 Measure Up Pendant Set Whitebeam Studio This matte and polished stainless-steel necklace features calipers, a ruler, and L square charms. $113 Courtesy TOM DIXON Brew Cafetiere and Espresso Cups Tom Dixon Coffee enthusiasts will enjoy the copper-finished, stainless-steel cafetiere and espresso cup set—the latest additionsto Tom Dixon’s Brew line of coffee products. Espresso Cups: $130; Cafetiere: $185 Camera Shoulder Bag WELCOMEPROJECTS Accessorize any outfit with this trendy twin-lens camera bag. Measuring four-and-a half inches long, four inches wide, and eight inches tall, this bag is suitable for all seasons. $760 Condiment Architecture Aldo Cibic Perfect for a table centerpiece, this nine-piece condiment set is made of bone china and features salt and pepper shakers, a vase, a toothpick holder, three ramekins, a pitcher, and a tray. $80 An Igloo On The Moon  Circa Press Let your young architect explore the many wonders of building with this historic and informative read by David Jenkins. $30 Plank Scarf Sam Jacob Studio Beat the cold this winter with this warm, twotoned scarf. Wood planks inspired the pattern and the yarn fringes mimic wood splinters. $38 Grid x Line Still Room The design of this foil-stamped stationary set includes a one-inch grid and two line weights. Grid x Line is available in six eye-catching foil colors and two paper types. $5.50-$9 Park Plate Collection notNeutral The National Mall in Washington, D.C., makes it table-side debut in this collection of plates, which includes images of Lincoln Memorial, Tidal Basin, Museum Core, and Capitol Hill. Individual: $50; Set: $180 White Brass Jewelry Collection Marmol Radziner Designed by Marmol Radziner Chief Jewelry Designer Robin Cottle, this fashion-forward jewelry line includes lightweight rings, three wrist cuffs, and earrings. $125 and up Ceramic Bowls and Glasses  Vipp Vipp has joined forces with Danish ceramicist Annemette Kissow to create a seven-piece, handcrafted collection consisting of a bowl, milk jug, egg ring, plate, espresso cup, coffee and teacup, and glasses. $35-$49 Livescribe Notebook Moleskine Moleskine partnered with Livescribe to create a high-tech notebook that turns handwritten notes into digital documents. The notebook works with Livescribe smartpens and the Livescribe+ app. $30
Placeholder Alt Text

Tonight! Join AN’s Matt Shaw in exploring energy, politics, and architecture in New York

Tonight, Monday, November 9, at New York's AIANY/Center for Architecture, AN Senior Editor Matt Shaw will be moderating a book talk between Janette Kim and Erik Carver, the authors of The Underdome Guide to Energy Reform, a new book released by Princeton Architectural Press. Stop by at 6:00p.m. tonight for light refreshments and beautiful drawings alongside a discussion about the future of ecologically minded architecture and urbanism. The Underdome Guide to Energy Reform is equal parts architect's handbook and toolbox for effecting environmental change with the built environment. The book maps different approaches to energy management and performance to examine their implications for collective life. Underdome catalogs a spectrum of positions argued for by a diverse cast including economists, environmentalists, community advocates, political scientists, and designers. In turn, it highlights in architecture questions of professional agency, the contemporary city, and collective priorities in the face of uncertain energy futures. Check it out on our events page here.
Placeholder Alt Text

Storefront’s Critical Halloween to explore the idea of “DEMO” at a historic Lower Manhattan firehouse

This October, the Storefront for Art and Architecture will host its annual Critical Halloween party in tandem with its ever-fascinating costume competition. The event will be held at the historic DCTV firehouse and engine bay in Lower Manhattan and will have a "DEMO" theme, with a prize for the best costume. Critical Halloween is a place to party, engage in intellectual debate, dress up in the most outlandish way possible, acting as a "space for expression of radical thought." During its tenure the event has quickly become the scene and welcome excuse for many to meet up, dance, talk and engage in one of the most celebratory nights of the year. This time the event is running the theme "DEMO"—a term that has multiple uses, being an abbreviate, prefix, verb and a noun. Hence, "DEMO" is the theme of dress partygoers are invited explore and examine ideas pertaining to contemporary issues and discourses in art, architecture and design focusing on those in need of a "dose of DEMO." From acts of collective will (DEMOnstration) to institutional erasure (DEMOlition), the notion of DEMO is one that penetrates many aspects of our contemporary society and that often inspires trepidation among those who produce culture. Tickets are $50, being found here and doors open at 9:00 p.m. on Saturday, October 31.

As for the prizes, awards will go to the following categories:

  • Best Overall Costume
  • Best Group Costume
  • Best Individual Costume
  • Best Duo/Couple Costume
  • Special Prize for Best Demolition Costume
  • Special Prize for Best Demonstration Costume
  • Special Prize for Best Democracy Costume

DEMOcratic Peoples Choice Award: Storefront will partner with Hyperallergic to host a Democratic People’s Choice Award. During the week following the event, online audiences will be able to vote on for their favorite Critical Halloween costume through Hyperallergic.

Placeholder Alt Text

Lunch at a Landmark: Norman Foster explains the creative process behind his iconic structures

On October 7, the New York Landmarks Preservation Foundation hosted its annual “Lunch at a Landmark” at the top of the Hearst Tower. Guests, New York’s elite architectural, design, and preservation cognoscenti, were offered a rare insight into the building—one from Norman Foster himself. To best explain his old-meets-new approach to the Hearst Tower, Foster revisited five of his past projects: the Reichstag in Berlin; the Millennium Bridge over the Thames; the Millau Viaduct in Millau, France; La Voile in St. Jean Cap Ferrat, France; and the Château Margaux in Bordeaux. The original Art Deco Hearst building by Joseph Urban was always intended to have a tower rising from its base. However, due to complications like the Great Depression, it was nearly 80 years before that tower came to fruition. To build the 46-story-tall skyscraper, Foster scooped out the building’s interior to introduce light and create a kind of “town-square.” This move was initially contested on the grounds of “facadism” but Foster persisted. “When someone says I can’t do something, that is when I get really excited about it,” he said. Now, the dynamic lobby with its dramatic entrance that takes pedestrians over an indoor waterfall to enter is one of the building’s most iconic design moments. Of course, Foster could make an educated guess that this would be the case. He took a similar approach to Berlin’s Reichstag in 1999. In that instance, the hollowed-out core was a historically sensitive move that visually helped to give the building back to the people. Even as he preserved the Russian graffiti and other emblems of the building’s past, the clear dome in the tower physically placed the people above the government as a bright symbol of democracy. Although bridges are markedly different from buildings, Foster also connected past and present with the Millennium Bridge and the Millau Viaduct, quite literally. Taking cues from St. Paul’s Cathedral and the Tate Modern in London, the Millennium Bridge’s thin, steel profile frames picturesque views of the city for the approximately 4 million people per year who walk across it. While France’s Millau Viaduct didn’t have to contend with any historic buildings, it presented a similar challenge in that its location, the Massif Central Region, is a National Heritage Site. Using tall piers to support the slender bridge, Foster and Michel Virlogeux (the lead engineer at Eiffage, the same company responsible for the Eiffel Tower), created a structure that only lightly touches the land and enhances the landscape for everyone driving across it. These three projects illustrate Foster’s concept of a design “marriage,” a relationship that he likens to a family, where there is a new generation that may have a distinct style, but it has very strong ties to the older generation. In two other projects he discussed, La Voile in St. Jean Cap Ferrat, France, and the Château Margaux in Bordeaux, Foster opted for a different approach. For La Voile, Foster ran up against a well-intentioned law in the South of France that protected the coastline. Unfortunately, this meant that a nondescript house on his client’s property was also protected. But, by hollowing out an old stone tower from the center, Foster created a new “skin,” a design that totally swallows the original home—perfectly preserving it without compromising the new design. In fact, the fit was so perfect, that the local police raided the house once to make sure the original one was accessible underneath (it was). Along similar lines, but less dramatically, Foster integrated a new structure for making white wine at the Château Margaux winery with an 1815 building by Louis Combes. Pulling inspiration from trees and farm structures, the resulting building appears to grow both organically from the site and from its 19th Century counterpart. These five projects offer a survey of Foster’s innovative and varying approaches to melding old and new architecture in ways both familiar and unique to each site. It will be exciting to see how these approaches unfold as he turns to more radical projects such as the drone port in Rwanda and beyond.
Placeholder Alt Text

Pelli Clarke Pelli designs San Antonio’s first new office tower in three decades

In downtown San Antonio, famed New Haven, Connecticut–based firm Pelli Clarke Pelli (PCP) teamed up with local Alamo Architects to design the new Frost Bank Tower headquarters. It will be the first office tower to join the San Antonio skyline in three decades and one of several new PCP buildings in Texas, including Dallas’ McKinney & Olive tower and the Shraman South Asian Museum and Learning Center. Weston Urban and KDC of Dallas selected the firms in part because of its extreme care and attention to detail. When the firm's representatives shared the project with the selection team, they presented an impeccably detailed paper model of downtown San Antonio with a variety of different towers to illustrate a variety of choices for the site. Appropriately, PCP’s project leads, principal Bill Butler and Fred Clarke, are both native Texans who have spent ample time in San Antonio. The new tower is proposed to be 400,000 square feet, have an emphasis on sustainability, and will be integrated with the new design of the San Pedro Creek area, where architect David Adjaye just revealed his own art gallery. PCP's plan will include a new bridge and plaza. Ground breaking is slated to begin fall 2016 and completion in 2018 or '19, loosely coinciding with San Antonio’s 300-year anniversary in 2018.
Placeholder Alt Text

David Adjaye reveals his design for a museum at the Linda Pace Foundation in San Antonio

Architect David Adjaye, known for his modern, site-specific buildings including the upcoming Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture, was commissioned by artist and philanthropist Linda Pace to design a structure along San Antonio’s San Pedro Creek for her eponymous foundation’s growing contemporary art collection. The new building, called Ruby City, is expected to open in 2018; groundbreaking will commence in 2016. Pace tasked Adjaye with creating a gallery space reminiscent of a building she saw in a dream. “When I visited San Antonio in 2007, and met with Linda, we sketched out ideas and together, we envisioned a building that would resonate with her dream of the Ruby City. Like a city, the design offers an organic, heuristic encounter with the Foundation’s works and my hope is that it will become a place where artists and the wider community can be inspired to realize their own dreams through a meaningful experience with contemporary art,” said Adjaye. Appropriately, Ruby City will be clad in vibrant red precast concrete panels with expansive windows overlooking the park and city. The 14,000-square-foot, two-story building will house three gallery spaces containing 800-odd paintings, sculptures, installations, and videos. “The building is envisioned as a beacon for San Antonio. The impact of the Foundation’s mission is already evidenced in San Antonio’s thriving contemporary art scene and its creative economy,” Linda Pace Foundation’s President, Rick Moore, said in a statement.
Placeholder Alt Text

Now open to the public, Zaha Hadid’s Italian Messner Museum is literally built inside a mountaintop

Zaha Hadid's Messner Mountain Museum Corones is perched 7,464 feet above sea level. The museum itself is embedded within Mount Kronplatz as if it was violently speared through the peak to overlook the breathtaking Dolomites region in the Italy. And you you can see the stunning views yourself now that the museum has officially opened to the public. The predominantly subterranean construction encouraged by Hadid was intended to allow the smooth, computer-drafted building to blend and contrast with the mountain's jagged rock. With only the cement-based entrance exposed, the museum resembles a singular, enormous climbing wall hand hold that, because of its natural color, is paired well alongside the mountain landscape inviting climbers to ascend to the peak. Said to represent the “supreme discipline of mountaineering,” the museum is one of six dedicated to the legendary mountaineer and explorer Reinhold Messner, who is known to be the first climber to ascend all fourteen "eight-thousanders" and the first to summit Everest without supplemental oxygen. Each Messner Museum commemorates not only his accomplishments as a mountaineer but more importantly honors mountain culture overall. Exhibits differ at each location, ranging from film to Dolomite paintings to relics representing those that shaped alpine history. Generally located in South Tyrol and Belluno, Italy, the first five museums are open to the general public. The MMM Corones opened its doors on Friday, July 24th.
Placeholder Alt Text

2014 European Solar Decathlon Announces Winners

The 2014 European Solar Decathlon has come to an end, and the international student competition to design cutting edge solar houses has produced a winner: Team Rhome of Universitá Degli Studi di Roma TRE. Their house, called Rhome for denCity, received a mark of 840.63 out of 1,000 maximum points, edging out the runner-up proposals by a slim margin. Second place went to Philéas by France's Atlantic Challenge and third place to Prêt-à-Loger by TU Delft. Philéas received a score of 839.75 points, coming in only just short of the victors and first place winners Rhome for denCity. The first place Rhome for denCity house is designed as a top floor apartment in the prototype stage that is meant to be a part of a four-story housing project. The house efficiently uses solar panels to power the house whilst relying on natural ventilation to cool its inhabitants. Its design, albeit modest, is pleasant and the house itself could serve as an outline for future sustainable houses. The European Solar Decathlon also gave out six awards for the winners of certain categories such as architecture and engineering/construction. The Dutch team TU Delft took the award for sustainability and communications with their third place entry: Prêt-à-Loger. France’s Athletic Challenge also won in the category of energy efficiency with their second place entry, Philéas.
Placeholder Alt Text

Theis and Khan to design RIBA’s New Headquarters

RIBA (COURTESY NICK GARROD/ VIA FLICKR) Sawing off competition from five other shortlisted firms, British architects Theis and Khan have been selected to design the Royal Institute of British Architects' new headquarters in London. Located only a few buildings away at 76 Portland Place in downtown London, RIBA’s new premises are to be located inside the current Institute of Physics building, which will be entirely renovated. The existing RIBA offices will be freed up for new exhibition and events space. Construction will begin in March 2014 and is expected to last a year. (Photo: NICK GARROD/ FLICKR)
Placeholder Alt Text

Sou Fujimoto’s Outlook Tower is a Stacked Mirage in Saudi Arabia

Tokyo-based architect and creator of this year's Serpentine Pavilion, Sou Fujimoto, has recently unveiled his latest rendering of Outlook Tower and Water Plaza, a proposal that's part of his master plan development for the coastal resort district of Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. His proposed 473,612-square-foot structure is based on a vernacular type of Islamic architecture and mirrors the shape of Bedouin tents. Seen from afar, their silhouettes are designed to form the shape of a mirage-like gateway linking the mainland to the sea. Fujimoto’s idea was to create a tower that would represent the forest and its intricate web of natural elements. The numerous towers act as natural airstream barriers, as the strong winds, particularly coming from the north, are funneled vertically into the space below. This circulation of air provides a cool breeze and the south-facing facades bring in natural light into indoor spaces. The building includes eco-friendly elements such as solar panels installed on its roof to provide energy and natural heat and an integrated geothermal heat pump system to cool the building. By creating a space that bridges order and chaos, Fujimoto was able to generate a futuristic prototype comprised of arching modules stacked one on top of the other, each measuring between 10 to 40 feet. As a whole, the resulting organization creates a mesmerizing architectural spectacle. Multiple waterfalls are placed across the arches of the structure, feeding water into a large dock at the base of the tower. Fujimoto also included other elements that provide sources of natural light that altogether create a series of multiple transparent towers.