Posts tagged with "Architecture":

The Architecture/Landscape/Interiors Department at Otis College of Art and Design is pleased to announce the 2018 George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture by HÖWELER + YOON!

Wednesday 21 February 2018 07:00 PM Open Seating 07:30 PM Lecture Ahmanson Auditorium at THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART, LOS ANGELES 250 South Grand Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90012 Through the initiative and support of Director Pat Scanlon, the GEORGE H. SCANLON FOUNDATION has generously funded an annual George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture since 1998. The 2018 George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecture celebrates this enduring and successful 20-year lecture series by featuring the work of Höweler + Yoon Architecture, presented by both of its principals, Eric Höweler and J. Meejin Yoon. “Höweler + Yoon is an internationally recognized multi-disciplinary architecture and design studio founded in 2005 by principals Eric Höweler and Meejin Yoon. Engaged in projects of all scales, the award-winning multidisciplinary practice operates in the space between architecture, art, and landscape. Engaged in academic, institutional, civic, and cultural projects, Höweler + Yoon is committed to both the practice-of and prospects-for architecture. From concept to construct, Höweler + Yoon is determined to realize the built idea and to test projects through the dynamic interaction between the construct and the larger public. www.howeleryoon.com Eric Höweler, AIA, LEED AP (b. Cali, Colombia) is an architect, educator, and co-founder of Höweler + Yoon Architecture. Höweler is an Associate Professor at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Prior to forming Höweler + Yoon Architecture, Höweler was a Senior Designer at Diller + Scofidio where he worked on the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston and the Juilliard School/ Lincoln Center in New York. As an Associate Principal at Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates, he was the senior designer on the 118 story ICC Tower in Hong Kong. Eric is the co-author of Expanded Practice: Projects by Höweler + Yoon Architecture / MY Studio (Princeton Architectural Press 2009) and author of Skyscraper: Vertical Now (Rizzoli/Universe Publishers 2003). J. Meejin Yoon, AIA, FAAR (b. Seoul, Korea) is a Korean-American architect and designer. In 2014, Yoon was appointed as the first female Head of the Department of Architecture at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Yoon is a registered architect and founder of MY Studio and Höweler + Yoon Architecture. Awarded the Irwin Sizer award for Most Significant Improvement (and Innovation) to Education at MIT in 2013, the United States Artist Award in Architecture and Design in 2008, the Athena RISD Emerging Designer Award in 2008, Architecture Record’s Design Vanguard Award in 2007, the Rome Prize in Design in 2005, and a Fulbright Fellowship in 1998, Yoon’s work has been widely recognized for its innovative and interdisciplinary nature. Her design research investigates new intersections between space, technology, and materiality. Yoon is the co-author of Expanded Practice: Projects by Höweler + Yoon Architecture / MY Studio (Princeton Architectural Press 2009) and author of Public Works: Unsolicited Small Projects for the Big Dig (MAP Book Publishers 2008).” - Höweler + Yoon Architecture Previous George H. Scanlon Foundation Lecturers were: (2017) Michiel Riedijk / Neutelings Riedijk Architects REDUX.5, (2016) Iñaki Ábalos / Ábalos+Sentkiewicz arquitectos REDUX.4, (2015) James Corner / Field Operations REDUX.3, (2014) Elizabeth Diller / Diller Scofido + Renfro REDUX.2, (2013) Winy Maas / MVRDV REDUX, (2012) George Hargreaves / Hargreaves Associates, (2011) Jürgen Mayer H. / J. MAYER H. Architects, (2010) Merrill Elam / Mack Scoggin Merrill Elam Architects, (2009) Sol Madridejos / SANCHO-MADRIDEJOS, (2008) Nader Tehrani / office dA, (2007) Elias Torres / Martinez Lapeña-Torres Arquitectos, (2006) Matthias Sauerbruch / sauerbruch hutton, (2005) Michiel Riedijk / Neutelings Riedijk Architects, (2004) Iñaki Abalos / Abalos & Herreros, (2003) Petra Blaisse / INSIDE OUTSIDE, (2002) James Corner / Field Operations, (2000) Dave Hickey / UNLV, (1999) Elizabeth Diller / Diller + Scofidio and (1998) Winy Maas / MVRDV. IMAGES clockwise from top Collier Memorial, MIT Campus, Cambridge, MA, design by Höweler + Yoon Architecture, photography by Iwan Baan Eric Höweler, photography by Höweler + Yoon Architecture J. Meejin Yoon, photography by Höweler + Yoon Architecture This lecture was organized by the ARCHITECTURE/LANDSCAPE/INTERIORS Department at Otis College of Art and Design, with Linda Pollari, Chair. For information about the department or lecture call 310.665.6867, email ArchitectureLandscapeInteriors@otis.edu or visit http://www.otis.edu/ali.

BECOMING DIGITAL CONFERENCE KEYNOTE: HITO STEYERL

Hito Steyerl is professor for experimental film and video and the co-founder of the Research Center for Proxy Politics at the Berlin University of the Arts. She studied cinematography and documentary film in Tokyo and Munich and wrote her doctoral thesis at the Academy of Fine Arts in Vienna. Her research focuses on media, technology and the distribution of images. In her texts, performances and essayist documentary films Hito Steyerl deals with postcolonial criticism and feminist criticism of representational logic. She works at the intersections of visual art and film as well as theory and practice. Her numerous works have been exhibited at the most prominent global art institutions, such as the Venice Biennale, the Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles and the Museum of Modern Art, New York. In addition to her work as an artist she was a lecturer at the Center for Cultural Studies at the Goldsmith College in London and a guest professor at the Royal Academy of Copenhagen and the Academy of Fine Arts, Helsinki. The Royal College of Art, London, honored her in 2016 with an "Honorary Doctorate". Co-sponsored by Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and the Penny W. Stamps School of Art & Design

Bay Book House (BaBH) San Francisco Competition

The Bay Book House (BaBH) San Francisco international competition for students and young architects consists in proposing a space for cultural exchange that will activate one or several of the unused piers of the historic Port of San Francisco. San Francisco is the fourth largest city in the State of California, with a population of around 860,000 distributed over 121 km2. It is located on the West Coast of the United States, on the north end of the San Francisco peninsula, with the Pacific Ocean to the west and connected to the mainland to the south. San Francisco is one of the most important cities of the United States, one of the most well-known cultural, technological and financial centres of California, at the leading edge of research in biotechnology and biomedicine, where the opportunities generated by the internet revolution continue to attract residents and skilled workers with high salaries. It also welcomes more than 16 million tourists a year, drawn by the iconic image of the city. Its music, cinema and monuments are recognized around the world. It was in 1849, during the California Gold Rush, when the small trading post known as Yerba Buena became the incoming port for numerous ships transporting thousands of fortune hunters from all over the world. The population grew from 400 to 25,000 residents in just one year. The promise of great fortunes was so tempting that the crews of the arriving ships deserted them and hurried to the gold fields, leaving the Port of San Francisco filled with ghost ships. Mud and gravel was dumped into the bay due to mining activity, extending the boundaries of San Francisco 10 blocks out from its natural border. With the outbreak of World War II, the port became a military logistics centre involving nearly all the piers, with ships and troops and warships docked all along the Embarcadero. After the war and the arrival of container ships, commercial traffic moved to the Port of Oakland, thanks also to the construction of the Bay Bridge. The piers fell into disuse and were relegated to storage or abandoned. Today, the north-eastern shore of San Francisco has been reborn as a walking path flanked by palm trees and with a trolley, where numerous piers have been transformed into restaurants, office buildings and commercial areas. There are plans to build a museum, a cruise ship terminal and other services and attractions for residents and visitors.   OBJECTIVE OF THE COMPETITION The objective of this competition for students and young architects, Bay Book House (BaBH) San Francisco, consists in proposing a space for cultural exchange that will activate one or several of the unused piers of the historic Port of San Francisco. Thanks to its privileged location, the proposed space will seek to become an international  meeting point for students and researchers, as well as for lovers of culture and general knowledge, where consultation, open-air reading or technological innovation will attract inhabitants or visitors. The BaBH aspires to be the future of traditional libraries, an evolution in the how we understand, use and enjoy this source of knowledge, a museum of (not) books adapted to today’s world, and where culture becomes a unique sensory experience. In a city filled with iconic images known around the world, this new space should become the new cultural reference of San Francisco, the flagship of the strong shoreline that is currently flowering.   JURY   Kim Herforth Nielsen - Co-founder and Principal of 3XN Architects Masahiro Harada - Co-founder of MOUNT FUJI ARCHITECTS STUDIO Ada Yvars - Principal of Mangera Yvars Architects Sara de Giles - Principal of MGM Morales de Giles Arquitectos Vanessa Vielma - Director of ArchDaily Mexico Manuel J. Feo- Professor at ETSA Las Palmas de Gran Canaria Diego Botella, Álvaro Jiménez, Omar Páez & Yacme Mangrané- Winner team of MoAN Egypt competition   PRIZES € 6,375 in prizes + 1 year free subscriptions to Arquitectura Viva magazine + 1 year free subscriptions to WA Wettbewerbe Aktuell magazine + Digital publication in Plataforma Arquitectura + Digital publication in Arquitectura Viva + Digital publication in Metalocus + Publication in WA Wettbewerbe Aktuell.   +INFO & REGISTRATION: http://www.arquideas.net/competition/bay-book-house

The Dallas Architecture Forum Presents Award-Winning Architect Fernanco Tabuenca

The Dallas Architecture Forum is pleased to continue its 2017-2018 season with leading Spanish architect Fernando Tabuenca, Founder, and Principal of Tabuenca & Leache Arquitectos in Pamplona, Spain. Since its founding in 1994, the firm has developed projects for residential, industrial, cultural, sport, education, and religious facilities with their work focused on urban, interior and product design, renovation and new construction. Tabuenca & Leache has been recognized across Europe and the United States with numerous awards from Fondazione Frate Sole, University of Ferrara, Faith and Form-American Institute of Architects, ECOLA, European Union Prize-Mies Van der Rohe and other well-known organizations, as well as receiving the 2016 American Architecture Gold Medal Prize in Architectural Design and Renovation. Their work has been published in many international magazines such as El Croquis, A&V, Arquitectura Viva, Casabella, Detail, Architekture Aktuell, AIT, Octogon, A+U and many others. Fernando Tabuenca has lectured in Spain, Italy, France, and Taiwan. At the present time, he is an associate professor in the College of Engineering and Architecture at the University of Zaragoza. Tabuenca has also taught in Pamplona, Madrid, and Buenos Aires, and he is now a visiting associate professor at Cornell University. www.tabuenca-leache.com/en See Additional Media Coverage:  Architecture Prize https://architectureprize.com/winners/winner.php?id=2804 The lecture will occur at 7 p.m. on November 14 with a complimentary reception beginning at 6:15 p.m. Tickets are $20 per lecture for general admission and $5 for students (with ID). Tickets can be purchased at the door before the lecture. No reservations are needed to attend Forum lectures. Dallas Architecture Forum members receive free admission to all regular Forum lectures as a benefit of membership, and AIA members can earn one hour of CE credit for each lecture. For more information on the Dallas Architecture Forum, visit www.dallasarchitectureforum.org or call 214-764-2406. Season Benefactors for the Dallas Architecture Forum’s 2017-2018 Season are Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty | Faisal Halum Group, D Home | D Magazine and Maharger Development – Reggie Graham. Fall/Winter Series Benefactors are Architectural Ligting Alliance, CORGAN and modmedia, inc // moderndallas.net. FERNANDO TABUENCA FOUNDER AND PRINCIPAL, TABUENCA & LEACHE ARQUITECTOS PAMPLONA, SPAIN 14 November 2017 Tuesday, 7:00 pm Reception and check-in 6:15 from 6:15-6:55 Magnolia Theater, West Village Presented in partnership with UTA-CAPPA

The Dallas Architecture Forum Presents 365 MODERN LIVING COCKTAIL RECEPTION

A great evening at one of the most interesting residences in Dallas. Full-Floor High Rise with Interior Architecture by Tom KUNDIG and Interior Design by Emily SUMMERS and their teams. Guests will enjoy a cocktail reception with hors d'oeuvres, and the chance to see the residence and hear from some members of the design team while enjoying the company of fellow design enthusiasts. The reception will be from 6 to 8 pm with remarks from some of the design team at approximately 6:45 pm. Valet parking will be provided. Business or cocktail attire is suggested. Purchase Admission https://dallasarchitecture.ejoinme.org/MyPages/365ModernLivingHomeReceptionSeries2017/tabid/908550/Default.aspx Admission is $90 per person for The Forum's members, $110 general admission. Limited attendance, Advance purchase required. Purchase can be made by credit card at the link provided, or by check, payable to "Dallas Architecture Forum" and mailed to P O Box 596119, Dallas, TX 75359. Those who purchase admission will receive confirmation from The Forum, including address and valet parking information. Monday, 30 October 2017, 6 to 8 pm PARK & PEARL HIGH-RISE RESIDENCE The Park & Pearl Residence floats among the critically acclaimed architecture of the Dallas Arts District. It is home to a forward-thinking couple who desired an industrial backdrop for their modern high- rise apartment. From a full floor shell apartment, the design team carved out interior spaces that celebrate the client's cutting-edge style and smartly unconventional approach to modern American life. The elegant, oval-shaped building perimeter is wrapped with floor to ceiling windows. Both the floor plan and architectural finishes were conceived to capitalize on the expansive 360-degree views and simultaneously mitigate the immense amount of Texas sunlight that would pour into the space. The window mullions were painted black to enhance the industrial feel of the residence. A midnight dark ceiling system with exposed ductwork was installed and 'almost black' terrazzo floors were poured. The disciplined commitment to light absorption carried into secondary finishes as well with inserted broad strokes of hot-rolled blackened steel, black walnut, and bright red lacquered metal walls. Living spaces, entertaining areas, and bedrooms are expertly located along the perimeter, unique views framed in each. Down the center of the unit are expansive corridors; the spine of the apartment. They provide storage, traffic flow, and gallery space. Clerestory windows allow light to inconspicuously graze the corridors without fully revealing the source. Aesthetically, the interior design extends the industrial architectural dialogue while avoiding loft clichés. Plush rugs, deep color tones, and bold curves create inviting gathering areas with instinctual traffic patterns encouraging people to explore the windows and views. Multifunctional rooms with custom furniture pieces function well, both for everyday activities and a robust entertaining calendar. The family room accommodates a movie night for the entire family and can also be an intimate dining spot for two. The space can be transformed for social events when one can turn the architect's famed "gizmo" and reveal a red lacquered bar hidden behind hot rolled steel panels. The client-proclaimed "man cave" has its own kitchen along with a ping pong table that doubles as a secondary dining spot for more casual affairs. The home is the perfect backdrop to display the owners' growing collection of contemporary art. From artists like James Brooks to Tomory Dodge, the clients have an eye for bold contemporary art that really pops and adds a unique element to this industrial residence. Interior Architecture: Tom Kundig, FAIA; Paul Schlachter, AIA Olson Kundig Interior Design: Emily Summers, ASID; Jennifer Long Emily Summers Design Associates About the Dallas Architecture Forum The Dallas Architecture Forum is a not-for-profit civic organization that brings leading architectural thought leaders from around the world to speak in Dallas and also fosters important local dialogue about the major issues impacting our urban environment. The Forum was founded in 1996 by some of Dallas’ leading architects, business, cultural and civic leaders, and it continues to benefit from active support and guidance from these citizens. The Forum fulfills its mission of providing a continuing and challenging public discourse on architecture and urban design in - and for - the Dallas area. The Dallas Architecture Forum's members include architects, design professionals, students and educators, and a broad range of civic-minded individuals and companies intent to improve the urban environment in North Texas. The Forum has been recognized nationally with an AIA Collaboration Achievement Award for its strategic partnerships with other organizations focused on architecture, urban planning, and the arts. For more information on the Forum, visit www.DallasArchitectureForum.org. Among the over 130 speakers who have addressed the Forum’s Lecture Series are Shigeru Ban, Brad Cloepfil, Diller + Scofidio, Peter Eisenman, Michael Graves, Daniel Libeskind, Thomas Phifer, Rafael Vinoly, Juhani Pallasmaa, AIA Gold Medal Winner Peter Bohlin, and regional architects David Lake and Ted Flato. Pritzker Prize winners speaking to the Forum have been Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Moneo, Thom Mayne, Rem Koolhaas and Norman Foster (the latter two in collaboration with the ATT Performing Arts Center). Other speakers for the Forum have been leading designers Calvin Tsao, Andrée Putman, and Karim Rashid; landscape architect Michael Van Valkenburgh; and National Trust President Emeritus Richard Moe. Important critics, authors, and patrons who have spoken to the Forum include Emily Pulitzer, Terence Riley, Pulitzer Prize winners Robert Campbell and Blair Kamin, Aaron Betsky, and the late David Dillon. The Forum organizes and presents an annual series of Panels—local, informal, open, and offered free of charge as a public service to the community—led by a moderator who brings a subject of local importance along with comments by participating panelists. Moderators and Panelists have also come from both other Texas cities as well as from national institutions that were connected with particular Panel subjects. Panels offer attendees the opportunity to participate in creating discourse. Important topics addressed in Panels in recent years include: “Thoughts on the Dallas Comprehensive Plan”; “The Kimbell Expansion: A Discussion”; “Filling Out the Dallas Arts District”; and “Re-envisioning the Trinity”. For more information on the Dallas Architecture Forum, visit www.dallasarchitectureforum.org. For questions about the Forum, call 214-764-2406.  

House In Forest 2018 – Timber House

HOUSE IN FOREST is pleased to announce its second annual international design competition: House In Forest 2018 - Timber House. This competition is designed to challenge and seek to explore the fantastic ides of architectural design, as well as landscape design and site planning. The aim of this competition is to promote our ideas of protecting the forest and its environment, as well as focusing on urban design problems, while simultaneously raising awareness of the sustainability. This year’s competition focuses on timber houses, an extraordinary architectural style with traditional methods of building with heavy timbers, creating structures and joined timbers with other components. Entrants are challenged to conceive a new and original concept for a timber house, however not strictly limited to the style of 'full-timbered structure'. A degree of flexibility and alternative choices are allowed, for example, 'half-timbered' or 'partially wooden', provided it is backed up with adequate justification. The project area is defined as a “forest area”. Whoever you are, students or experienced designers, working individually or in teams, we warmly welcome you to take participate in this competition. Winning participants will receive a cash prize with a certificate. The total prizes are $1,000, including $500 for the first place winner. Please visit website for more details http://HouseInForest.com   SCHEDULE 25/10/2017 Competition Launch 01/11/2017 - 30/11/2017 Pre-Registration 01/12/2017 - 31/12/2017 Early Bird Registration 01/01/2018 - 31/01/2018 Standard Registration 01/02/2018 - 01/03/2018 Last Minute Registration 01/03/2018 Submission Deadline 01/03/2018 - 30/04/2018 Jury Deliberation 01/05/2018 Winner Announced Note: All deadlines are 11:59 pm – 00:00 am GMT (Greenwich Mean Time)   REGISTRATION Entrants may register as individuals or as a team, consisting of a maximum of 5 members. All architecture, landscape, planning or design students, as well as professionals, are eligible to participate in the competition. They may do so by filling the registration form and submitting it with the appropriate payment through the secure gateway (PayPal) on our website. The registration fee is: 01/11/2017 - 30/11/2017 Pre-Registration - $35 01/12/2017 - 31/12/2017 Early Bird Registration - $45 01/01/2018 - 31/01/2018 Standard Registration - $55 01/02/2018 - 01/03/2018 Last Minute Registration - $65 Your Team Code will be sent by email within 48 hours after the registration and payment process. Remember that the code is unique and valid for each submitted entry.   AWARDS First Prize - $500 + Certificate + Portfolio Publication Second Prize - $300 + Certificate + Portfolio Publication Third Prize - $200 + Certificate + Portfolio Publication 10 Honorable Mentions to be published on the site   In case of any queries, please send us a mail at info@HouseInForest.com

Reimagine the Canals: Competition

The New York Power Authority and the New York State Canal Corporation launched a competition seeking ideas to shape the future of the New York State Canal System, a 524-mile network composed of the Erie Canal, the Oswego Canal, the Cayuga-Seneca Canal, and the Champlain Canal. Selected ideas will be awarded a total of $2.5 million toward their implementation. The New York State Canal System is one of the most transformative public works projects in American history. The entire system was listed as a National Historic District on the National Register of Historic Places in 2014 and designated as a National Historic Landmark in 2017 for its role in shaping the American economy and urban development. Despite its past success, vessel traffic on the Canal System has steadily declined over the last century. Deindustrialization and competition from rail, pipelines, roadways and the St. Lawrence Seaway, put the Canals at a disadvantage in transporting freight. Pleasure boating activity levels have likewise fallen and are today only half what they once were. In contrast to the decreasing maritime activity on the Canal System, recreational uses along it – from hiking and bicycling in spring, summer, and fall to cross-country skiing and ice fishing in winter – have grown in popularity. The 750-mile Empire State Trail, which will run from New York City to Canada and from Albany to Buffalo, is expected to be completed in 2020. It will further enhance opportunities for recreation along portions of the Canal System. To date, however, much of the Canal System’s potential to stimulate tourism and economic activity in the communities along its corridor remains untapped. To address the challenges and opportunities facing the Canal System, the Competition seeks visionary ideas for physical infrastructure projects as well as programming initiatives that promote:
  • the Canal System as a tourist destination and recreational asset
  • sustainable economic development along the canals and beyond
  • the heritage and historic values of the Canal System
  • the long-term financial sustainability of the Canal System
The two-stage Competition is open to individuals, businesses, non-profits and municipalities. Respondents are encouraged to form multidisciplinary teams. These could include, for example, urban designers and architects, planning and community specialists, hydrologists, infrastructure engineers, artists and curators, development economists, real estate developers, local officials and financing partners. Submissions from both domestic and international teams are welcome. Submission deadline is January 5, 2018. More details about the Competition structure, timeline, and submission guidelines can be found on the website.
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Catch a Design Film at the Seattle 2016 ByDesign Film Festival

What could be better than film, urbanism, architecture, and design? When film, urbanism, and design unite, we get powerful and insightful results: there’s La Haine, a French film that follows three young men in the banlieues of Paris; there’s Mon Oncle, that pokes fun at the absurdities of residential Corbusian inspired architecture; and more recently films like My Architect, where Louis Kahn’s son seeks to know his father's work, and through his work, his father. For those of you in the Seattle area this week, a heads up: the Northwest Film Forum (NWFF) is hosting its annual design film festival, ByDesign 2016 that features films exploring architecture, art, urban design, and other design-related themes. The festival runs for four days: April 14-17.

BYDESIGN 2016 TRAILER (COURTESY NORTHWEST FILM FORUM)

NWFF is screening the German film, Beyond Metabolism, which looks at the impact of Metabolism, an architectural post-WWII movement in Japan (that could be a distant cousin to Brutalist architecture with its imposing, monumental concrete forms) through the lens of Sachio Otani’s Metabolist 1966 International Conference Center in Kyoto. Then there’s Getting Frank Gehry, that presents Gehry's controversial and first Australian-built project: the one-year-old tree-house-inspired Dr Chau Chak Wing Building, which serves as the home for the University of Technology business school in Sydney. Farther north, Strange and Familiar: Architecture on Fogo Island, delves into Todd Saunder's architecture—an inn and artist studios that populate a rugged island in Newfoundland and Labrador in eastern Canada. The Chinese film, The Land of Many Palaces investigates the intersection of urban relocation, development, real estate, ownership, and coal in China’s largest ghost city, Ordos City, located over 400 miles west of Beijing. Built by the government with the wealth of newfound Ordos coal deposits, officials are moving farmers living in the countryside to the newly developed urbanized area. “Neighbors and friends,” says a woman with a microphone in the movie trailer who appears to be a government representative addressing new residents, “We are trying to create a more civilized city.” The festival opens with a film staring artist Tom Sachs, A Space Program, who will attend the Seattle premier. If you live closer to New York City and Los Angeles, the two cities will play host to architecture and design film festivals this fall (filmmakers: there's an open call for submissions).
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A step too far? Vasily Klyukin’s “Sexy” leg tower fails to impress

When enjoying sustained periods of economic prosperity and growth, it's almost natural to want to flaunt, in untamed excess, the fruits of entrepreneurship through architectural means. Just look at the Pyramids of Giza, the Roman Colosseum and more recently, Trump Tower and areas of China. What's significant though, is that China, instead of growing out of this phase, has put a stop to the practice altogether. Russian billionaire and amateur architect Vasily Klyukin has other ideas. "This concept is very extravagant, even for the modern World," Klyukin wrote on his website, and he's not wrong. The tower design—centered on a "sexy leg"—has been met with fervent hostility, mostly due to its complete disregard for its Lower Manhattan context and subsequent intent on standing out like sore thumb—or toe, in this case. "Someone will be shocked by this idea, someone will find it beautiful and sexy, someone—vulgar, but everybody, without an exception, would want to observe such a tower or visit it at least once in a lifetime. If this building will become a hotel—it will always be crowded. I personally would like to live in this tower," Klyukin continued. Dubbed the "Russian-born Tony Stark," Klyukin dabbles in real estate, sci-fi literature, sculpture, and yacht design as well as apparently being a Doctor of Historical Sciences. One doubts whether he himself even sees these designs being realized, despite his desire to live in them one day. His book, Designing Legends (Klyukin referring to his own designs) is available on Amazon for only $54, and so far has only received five-star reviews. One fan comments: "Klyukin is indulging in a playful critique of contemporary architecture and the post-Modern [sic] city, but it’s really an 'artist’s book,' or in the parlance of the previous century, 'un livre d’artiste.'" As much as one tries to find any validation in his proposals, further probing reveals deep-rooted egotism. Such an ethos is highlighted by Klyukin's Cobra Tower design. There is no place for this snake, something he inadvertently points out himself by imagining the tower in a number of locations such as China, Japan, and London. From this we can see that Klyukin deems his surroundings irrelevant; all that matters is that his design dominates the skyline, regardless of its relationship to its vicinity. When a large enough proportion of designers subscribe to this approach, the result is a chaotic conglomeration of buildings attempting to shout louder than each other. Any identity within the vicinity is lost, the art of placemaking long forgotten and the world quickly becomes alienating. Beijing artist Cao Fei exemplified this journey into cultural obscurity with Shadow Plays by revealing the "hypothetical extremities to which China is susceptible as a product of growth and potential collapse."
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Daniel Libeskind on Acoustics, his Unexpected Architectural Process, and his Latest Venture One Day in Life

Little known fact: As a child, Daniel Libeskind was an accordion virtuoso. Until he was about 18, Libeskind toured the world playing concerts on his accordion and busting out works like Flight of the Bumblebee before he was in high school. “I think I probably made more money per hour than I do now,” he joked last night in Cosentino’s showroom where he revealed his latest venture: A 24-hour musical experience with over 75 consecutive concert events in Frankfurt May 21–22. The event, One Day in Life, was meant to capture what Libeskind defined as the “18 dimensions of existence,” such as body, will, memory, gravity, secret, work, and waiting. These “dimensions of existence” correspond with 18 different venues throughout Frankfurt, including Alte Oper, whose artistic and managing director, Dr. Stephan Pauly, coordinated the event with Libeskind. Other venues include a bunker, the Hospital zum heiligen Geist, the Commerzbank Arena, VGF Betriebshofand rail yard depot, a boxing gym, a pool, and a moving streetcar. Libeskind also selected the performers and ensembles to play the music, which includes a mix of classical and modern pieces. The music is meant to evoke its venue’s assigned dimension, for example, French composer Marin Marais’s Tableau de l’Opération de la Taille will be performed at the hospital. In a trifecta of Libeskind’s artistic talents, he created a drawing of the intersection of music, architecture, and the city entitled Musical Labyrinth. The drawing corresponds with the locations of One Day in Life and will be etched in white on a large, inky black platform of Cosentino Dekton tile in front of the Alte Oper Concert Hall. After the unveiling of One Day in Life AN’s managing editor Olivia Martin sat down with Libeskind to discuss how music, art, and architecture can work in concert. The Architect’s Newspaper: Has music always played this prominent role in your art and architecture? Libeskind: Drawing is like writing, like making music, like architecture. It’s an art that has to do with the mind, the hand, and your heart. That’s the connection in music and architecture. Did picking these locations and working out the music to be played in them inspire you to build anything in the future? It made me think about concert halls—there are not enough new concert halls and when they are built, it is not in a 21st-century way. They are more like the Viennese concert hall, more nostalgia about old acoustics, I think we need contemporary 21st-century ways for people to form a community around music, I thought of that a lot. I built not long ago the Grand Canal Theatre in Dublin and I especially took care with acoustics. I thought, what if I were up on stage? What does it look like? What does it feel like for someone performing? Do you always take an acoustic-centric approach to your buildings? I think of acoustics first. I think we are too addicted to the visual world today. It is a great medium to promote visual work but the inner ear when you listen and your orientation is more prominent than seeing. I also directed an opera, Saint François d'Assise by Messiaen. At first they asked me to do everything, including conducting, but then I looked at the score and it would take a year just to do the score—I’d have to give up architecture. So I said no, I cannot conduct, but I did everything else. I did the direction, the costumes, the stage, the lighting, everything except conducting. I’ve also done a lot of set design for opera, but I am an architect, I don't have time for stage design. So would you say you’ve picked architecture over music? No, I believe architecture is an extension of music. For me music is not a metaphor, it’s not the analysis of notes. It’s not an applique of music to architecture. It is a condensation of emotional intelligence and the sense of orientation in the ear and that is what connects it to the field. We should analyze our cities acoustically. How beautiful would it be to not only decorate our city with green but also think about the sound of New York? Every city has its own sound and it would lead to greater joy if people thought about the sound of their cities and the spectrum between silence and noise… and maybe it would give us more perspective than the simulation on our devices.  
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Weird, but not so wonderful, says China as it bans “weird” architecture

Question: What has three Arcs de Triomphe, an Eiffel Tower, an Egyptian Sphynx, a Louvre, London Bridge and ten White Houses all over? The answer: China, of course. If the Chinese government has its way, that will soon change.

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The duplicate architectural icons may end there as the country's authorities have said no to anymore "oversized, xenocentric, weird" architecture, The New York Times reports. The State Council and the Communist Party’s Central Committee last week stated that there is to essentially be no more copycat architecture, and instead urged new builds to be “suitable, economic, green and pleasing to the eye.” The directive also stipulated that "the chaotic propagation of grandiose, West-worshipping, weird architecture" should be ended, while gated communities have also been vetoed.

Guidelines arose after meetings discussed issues regarding the alarming rate of urbanization that China is undergoing. Just two years ago, President Xi Jinping expressed his views on China's architectural scene, again deeming it "weird" saying there was to be "no more weird architecture." He went on to say that the current climate displayed "a lack of cultural confidence and some city officials’ distorted attitudes about political achievements," though only now does action appear to be being taken.

According to a translation by the Wall Street Journal Blog, Yang Baojun, vice director of the China Academy of Urban Planning and Design (CAUPA), commented on the directive, saying that "the document is a wake-up call for those places where [there has been] a one-sided pursuit of architectural form over function, where cultural orientation has been compromised by an excessive desire to show off."

The New York Times meanwhile reports that experts have warned of "stricter design standards for public buildings." It also added that, an online forum for the Communist Party newspaper, People's Dailypredicted that "in the future it is unlikely that Beijing will have other strangely shaped buildings like the ‘Giant Trousers’ " referring to the China Central Television Headquarters (CCTV) by OMA.

Feng Guochuan, an architect based in Shenzhen spoke about how the President Xi's words had already begun to have an impact on decision making regarding new projects. He was also worried that Xi was meddling with matters that should only concern urban planners, and not the President. "Generally speaking, local governments now tend to approve more conservative designs," he said.

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However, Wang Kai, vice president of CAUPA, said these stricture design guidelines would mainly be applied to public schemes, while private projects would still have freedom. "For private housing or commercial projects, there is still space for innovation."

Mr. Wang also added that "we shouldn’t go overboard in pursuit of appearances," going on to say how functionality should be the main concern in public buildings.

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Futuristic coffee shop, Voyager Espresso, opens in New York’s Financial District

Voyager Espresso, a 550-square-foot coffee bar, brings the perks of artisanal coffee to New York’s perpetually caffeine craving Financial District in the new Fulton Center. The bar opened in January and was crafted by New York–based design practice Only If, a team of five architects and designers founded in 2013. The clients, a pair of Australians, wanted the space to look distinctly different from the ubiquitous white tile, reclaimed wood, and Edison bulb coffee shop aesthetic and had ambitious plans despite their tight budget. With this in mind, Adam Frampton, principal at Only If, opted for an “inexpensive but futuristic” material palette of aluminum enamel painted oriented strand board, black marble, perforated aluminum and copper, and black rubber. “In such a small and constrained space, our first intuition was to be very pragmatic with the layout and articulate the design through the materials and details. However, we didn’t want to simply decorate the space,” Frampton said. “It soon became apparent that a more figural gesture—albeit less efficient in terms of quantity of seating—improved ergonomics within the service area and produced a greater identity and hierarchy.” Frampton also devised a layout based on two circles: The positive volume, a barista station, allows two baristas to work simultaneously and a negative volume, the "grotto," a seating space carved out of the surrounding walls. Frampton and his team worked through many iterations before landing on this clever configuration. “The method of exhausting all possibilities until the best fit emerges is probably something that came from my experience working at OMA,” said Frampton. “What’s really interesting about the layout is how it activates different social settings and creates different types of seating.” The careful planning paid off: After seven weeks of preparing the design and obtaining the correct permit, drawing, and construction documents, the space was built in about eight weeks. It is now open Monday through Friday, 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at 110 William Street through the John Street subway entrance.