Posts tagged with "Architectural League of New York":

Toshiro Oki Architects Win 2013 Folly Competition at Socrates Sculpture Park

In just one short year the Folly competition, co-sponsored by the Architectural League of New York and Socrates Sculpture Park, has become vastly popular among members of the architecture and design community, receiving 40 percent more submissions than last year. This year a jury examined 150 innovative submissions but selected only one winning entry. The prize? The winner, with the help of a $5,000 grant, gets to see the proposed design come to life in the Socrates Sculpture Park. Toshiro Oki, Jen Wood, and Jared Diganci of Toshiro Oki Architects were selected as the winners of this year’s competition for their design called tree wood. Socrates Sculpture Park in Long Island City first established the competition in 2012, asking emerging architects and designers to submit their ideas for a “folly,” a traditional architectural structure or pavilion, typically found in 18th and 19th century gardens. At first glance the folly may seem fanciful, it’s existence nonsensical, but careful observation reveals that the structure was intentionally built and precisely positioned to frame a particular view. This decorative installation not only embellishes an outdoor space, but also shrewdly allows the occupant to enter into a dialogue with his natural surroundings. Toshiro Oki Architects' contemporary interpretation of the traditional architectural folly consists of a simple geometric wooden-framed structure placed in the midst of a verdant thicket of trees. The minimalist man-made structure, made completely of wooden beams held together by 2x4 nails, will be built around the trees and flourishing branches occupying the site, therefore coexisting with, but never disturbing nature. The most enchanting design element of tree wood is the elaborate chandelier that will elegantly dangle from the center of the structure and exist in harmony with the leaves around it. Passersby may occasionally hear the serene musical chiming of the chandelier as the wind softly whistles through the trees, lending a very poetic nature to the folly. In addition to a winner four finalists were selected as well: Pier by Keefe Butler, Elenchus by Julien Leyssene, Curtain Spolia by Georg Rafailidis & Stephanie Davidson, Guesthouse Belvédère by Marc Maurer and Nicole Maurer-Lemmens.

The City That Never Was: Learning from the Spanish Housing Bubble

Described as "crime scene photos," stark images of Spain’s housing bubble landscapes depict a grim reality. But instead of a somber discourse on the evils of political corruption and real estate speculation, the Architectural League’s symposium this past Friday, The City That Never Was, looked forward and, as Iñaki Abalos aptly asked, wondered if we, "can turn shit into gold." Building on their research and design studios at the University of Pennsylvania, Chris Marcinkoski and Javier Arpa, the moderators, explored the future of urbanism through the lens of Spain’s economic crisis and its resulting desolate urban form. Framing the historical context of boom and bust cycles, they reveal that the Spanish situation is only unique in scale and intensity. It exists as part of a larger commodification of urbanism all over the world resulting in similar conditions in an ever simplified placeless urbanism. An international range of speakers from both Spain and the US covered issues regarding agricultural production, city planning, waste flows, and repurposing of vacant land. Each panel ended in a group discussion which began as an invigorating dialog, but by end of day became a bit muddled in message. University of Pennsylvania’s new Chair of Landscape Architecture, Richard Weller, struck a positive note in the final panel when he said that each speaker had "left clues" as to how the current situation could be ameliorated and avoided in the future. Some of which included Barcelona’s Enric Batlle’s ideas regarding the preparation of space over time providing a road map for incremental change and Chris Reed’s kit of parts for Detroit which could be useful in facilitating the reuse of incomplete developments. In thinking about other paradigms for development, Weller advised "designing the system, not the aesthetic." To that point, the discussion of waste became particularly fertile when Robin Nagle, anthropologist-in-residence for the NY Department of Sanitation answered the previously asked question with a resounding, "Shit is gold!" The audience may not have left with a definitive recommendation but was certainly inspired about the possibilities.

The New In Crowd: Architectural League’s 2013 Emerging Voices Announced

Reflecting the various currents of contemporary architecture and urbanism, the Architectural League of New York has announced its line-up for the 2013 Emerging Voices lecture series. The series showcases notable talent from across North America and is selected through a portfolio competition that emphasizes built work. The program has had a remarkable track record at identifying important architects. Past Emerging Voices have included Steven Holl, Morphosis, Jeanne Gang, and SHoP among many other boldface archinames. cao | perrot Studio of Los Angeles and Paris, principals Andy Cao and Xavier Perrot garciastudio of San Diego and Tijuana, Mexico, principal Jorge Garcia (pictured at the top of the post). DIGSAU of Philadelphia, principals Jules Dingle, Jeff Goldstein, Mark Sanderson, and Jamie Unkefer dlandstudio of New York, principal Susannah Drake MASS Design Group of Boston and Kigali, Rwanda, principals Sierra Bainbridge, Michael Murphy, Alan Ricks, and David Saladnick Ogrydziak Prillinger Architects of San Francisco, principals Luke Ogrydziak and Zoe Prillinger PRODUCTURA of Mexico City, principals Carolos Bedoya, Wonne Ickx, Victor Jaime, and Abel Perles SO-IL of New York City, principals Florian Idenburg and Jing Liu All lectures will be held at Scholastic Auditorium located at 557 Broadway. On March 7 the League will feature SO-IL and garciastudio. March 14 dlandstudio and MASS Design Group will lecture. DIGSAU and Ogrydziak Prillinger will speak on March 18 and March 28 will feature cao | perrot and PRODUCTURA.

Save Your Best Moves for Beaux Arts Ball 2012

The Architectural League of New York has recently announced the theme and location of it's annual Beaux Arts Ball for 2012.  The event itself will be held on Saturday, September 22, in the Williamsburgh Savings Bank in Downtown Brooklyn. Emerging architects SOFTlab will be in charge of realizing this year's theme, "Tender," within the space. Recognized as one of the premier annual gatherings of the architectural and design community in New York, the Beaux Arts ball typically attracts over 1,000 architects, designers, artists, and friends annually. First held in New York City in 1913 by the Society of Beaux Arts, the gathering was revived in 1990 by The Architectural League to benefit its ongoing architecture and design programs, including lectures, exhibitions, and publications. As an icon of the Brooklyn skyline, the Williamsburgh Savings Bank is sure to wow guests and be remembered as yet another architecturally significant venue. The festivities will take place underneath the 63-foot high ceilings of it's former banking hall and architects from design studio SOFTlab in collaboration with Natasha Jen of Pentagram will design the space for the evenings festivities. The theme, "Tender," with it's multiple interpretations as noun, verb, and adjective will shape their design. Tickets for this event can be purchased in advance at archleague.org and at the door that evening.

On View> Garden Folly Installation Opens at Socrates Sculpture Park

Folly Socrates Sculpture Park 3205 Vernon Boulevard Queens, NY Through October 21 Socrates Sculpture Park and the Architectural League of New York present the inaugural recipients of the park’s “Folly” grant and residency for emerging architects and designers to New Yorkers Jerome Haferd and K. Brandt Knapp. The residency was established to investigate the intersection of architectural and sculptural disciplines and the increasing overlap in references, materials, and techniques between the two. To this end, young architects and designers were asked to propose a contemporary interpretation of the folly, a structure whose purpose is purely decorative but architectural in form. Haferd and Knapp’s winning submission, Curtain (above), is composed of a series of slender wooden posts that define a space of 20 feet on each side and a triangulated roof canopy approximately 8 to 12 feet high. White chains, some suspended between posts and some left hanging, will suggest occupiable spaces within the structure and will sway with the breeze off the East River—a play on the modernist conception of the “curtain wall.”

On View> Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers 2012: No Precedent

Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers 2012: No Precedent Arnold and Sheila Aronson Galleries Parsons The New School for Design 66 Fifth Avenue June 21–August 3 2012 marks the 25th anniversary of the Architectural League Prize for Young Designers and Architects. Each year, up and coming talent, defined as less than ten years out of school, is recognized for excellent and inspiring work. This year's theme was No Precedent, and reflects the committee’s perception of young architects’ careers as “suggestive, speculative, and on the brink,” according to a statement. The exhibition includes Jorge Arvizu, Ignacio del Rio, Emmanuel Ramirez, and Diego Ricalde, MMX Studio, Mexico City; Jimenez Lai, Bureau Spectacular, Chicago; Sean Lally, WEATHERS/Sean Lally (above), Chicago; Seung Teak Lee and Mi Jung Lim, STPMJ, Brooklyn; Michael Szivos, SOFTlab, New York; Koji Tsutsui, Koji Tsutsui & Associates, San Francisco and Tokyo.

The Architectural League’s Folly

The word "folly" is derived from the French folie, or "foolishness." Also known as an "eyecatcher," a folly was traditionally an extravagant, non-functional building, which was meant to enhance the landscape. Rooted in Romantic ideals of the picturesque, a folly often acted as an ornate small-scale intervention which transformed and visually dramatized the landscape around it. The winners of this year's Folly Competition sponsored by The Architectural League of New York and Socrates Sculpture Park, competition winners Jerome Haferd and K. Brandt Knapp proposed a new interpretation of the folly, "Curtain."  Rather than being a whimsical, ornate structure which sits in the landscape, this folly, built from white plastic chain, is more like a small pavilion. The restraint shown by this structure echoes the idea of Shigeru Ban's "curtain" wall house, something which represents a new vision for a folly. Shown in the landscape as an object, the building is closer to Corbusier's Villa Savoye than to The Dunmore Pineapple or the follies of Parc de La Vilette. There is no formal exuberance, no faux-ruins, no absurdity, only a white pavilion-like structure. In an idiosyncratic interpretation of "folly", the architects have chosen spatial effects as the jumping off point for an object in a landscape. This project is by definition a folly, especially the version that has been used in the United States, which often includes garden pavilions and gazebos. This project alters our perception of the landscape via translucency. It mediates between visually obscuring background trees, operating in the middle ground as a spatial intervention, while simultaneously existing as a voluminous foreground object. It is a non functional building aligned with sculpture, or architectural installation. The white box with the faceted roof also reflects what is apparently the personal fancy of the architects, and thus "Curtain" cannot escape the definition of folly, while also "redefining" the term.

Wanted: Neighborhood for Aluminaire

  The Aluminaire House is homeless once again. Built in 1931 for the Allied Arts and Industry and Architectural League Exhibition, the house introduced prefabricated design methods espoused by Le Corbusier to an American audience. Corbu disciple Albert Frey designed the house with A. Lawrence Kocher, onetime editor at Architectural Record. After more than 100,000 visitors passed through, the architect Wallace Harrision snapped it up and placed it on his estate to be used as guest house. The building later was featured in Hitchcock and Johnson's 1932 MoMA exhibition and in their book The International Style. Eventually, the house came under the care of the New York Institute of Technology and onto their former Islip campus. Last month, the house was dismantled once again and handed over to the newly formed Aluminaire House Foundation, run by architects Frances Campani and Michael Schwarting of Campani and Schwarting Architects. It would seem that the repetitious reassembly and dismantling has inadvertently supported the modular mass production theories of the house’s designers. With that in mind, the foundation is looking for a low-rise high-density site on the outskirts of New York City where the house might not necessarily be an aesthetic fit, but a theoretical one. In a telephone interview Schwarting said that that a place like Forrest Hills Queens, where Kocher once lived, might be an interesting notion, in so much as this too was middle class housing for a planned community. The group has also identified a site in Sunnyside Gardens, which was arose in nearly same period of the Aluminaire, but was built in a stripped-down colonial revival style.  But Schwarting noted that, like Sunnyside's housing stock, the plan for the house was to be as repeatable as the multiblock redbrick abodes found there. “They were both looking at housing problems at the same time,” said Schwarting. “They’re visually very different, but they were addressing the same issues.” The group has looked into other locales and entities. They’ve been in touch with Barry Bergdoll at MoMA. “It’s fairly demanding in putting the house back together the way it was,” said Schwarting. “With a museum it becomes an art object and I don’t think we need to go that far.” Giving the house over to a public entity such as the Parks Department would involve all negotiating a caretaker situation with a department that is already stretched to the limit, as was demonstrated in the recent Poe Park Visitor Center debacle.  They even talked to Richard Meier as he did the layout for the Houses of Sagaponac development, but that deal fell through, which was probably a fortuitous. “We hope to return to the house to the agenda of the early modern movement,” said Schwarting. “If we can put it in a reasonable setting, where its original intentions for affordable housing are reflected, that would be ideal.”

Architectural League Announces Young Architects Awards

The results are in and the winners of the 31st annual Architectural League Prize for Young Architects + Designers were announced on Friday. The recipients of the 2012 awards are: Jorge ArvizuIgnacio del RioEmmanuel Ramirez, and Diego Ricalde, MMX Studio, Mexico City; Jimenez Lai, Bureau Spectacular, Chicago; Sean Lally, WEATHERS / Sean Lally, Chicago; Seung Teak Lee and Mi Jung Lim, STPMJ, Brooklyn; Michael Szivos, SOFTlab, New York; and Koji Tsutsui, Koji Tsutsui & Associates, San Francisco and Tokyo. Formerly the Young Architects Forum, the League Prize is considered one of North America's most prestigious awards for young architects. The renderings and images reflect the theme of this year's prize, No Precedent. League committee members and competition jurors valued the competition entries based on a perception of the career of a young architect. According to the League's announcement, jurors sought "ideas, works, and methodologies that are unfounded, ungrounded, and suspect…the things no one has done before, and that one has little experience with.” The winners reflected the notion of their burgeoning careers by displaying work that is, “suggestive, speculative, and on the brink." Beginning June 21st, the winners will display their work at Parsons The New School for Design. Their work will also be featured in a new volume of the Young Architects series jointly published by Princeton Architectural Press and the League.

Architectural League Honors Amanda Burden’s Commitment to Quality Design

Amanda Burden, Chair of the New York City Planning Commission and Director of the Department of City Planning, is the recipient of the Architectural League of New York’s highest honor, the President’s Medal. The League’s President and Board of Directors grant the award to individuals in recognition of an exceptional body of work in architecture, urbanism, or design. The medal was presented to Burden last night at an awards ceremony. According to the League, Amanda Burden has “raised the bar for quality design in public and private development, demonstrating that good design is essential to the long-term health and sustainability of cities.” Under Burden’s leadership, the City Planning Commission has worked to promote transit-oriented economic development through rezoning more than a third of the city, with the creation of urban master plans for major neighborhoods like Jamaica, Downtown Brooklyn, Hudson Yards, Coney Island, and 125th Street. Burden has been instrumental in the development of some of New York City’s most important public spaces, including the High Line, the revitalization of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts, the East River Waterfront Esplanade, IKEA Erie Basin Park, and the National 9/11 Memorial. Through these efforts, Burden has been a champion of design, proving its role in fostering economic and social development of communities.

Eight Emerging Voices Honored by the Architectural League

Eight up-and-coming architecture firms from across North America have been distinguished as Emerging Voices by the Architectural League. The prestigious award is bestowed annually on a group of firms that have established a distinct design voice in their work and have "the potential to influence the disciplines of architecture, landscape design, and urbanism." This year's winners are INABA, 5468796 architecture, SCAPE Landscape Architecture, Studio NMinusOne, Oyler Wu Collaborative, SsD, Arquitectura 911sc, and Atelier TAG. A jury comprised of Henry Cobb, Geoff Manaugh, Paul Lewis, Jamie Maslyn Larson, Annabelle Selldorf, Claire Weisz, and Dan Wood selected the firms based on a review of their portfolios. Past Emerging Voices have included many of today's top-name architects including Morphosis, Enrique Norten, Deborah Berke, Michael Maltzan, SHoP Architects, Jeanne Gang, and Steven Holl. Each year, the winning firms present their work at a lecture series presented by the League in New York. Beginning on March 2, will take place at the Rose Auditorium in the new Morphosis-designed building at The Cooper Union. Also watch for an upcoming issue of The Architect's Newspaper where we feature a profile of each Emerging Voices winner. Information on the lecture series and architecture firms from the Architectural League: All lectures will be held at the Rose Auditorium, The Cooper Union, 41 Cooper Square, New York City at 7:00 p.m. Tickets are required for admission to the lectures. For more information on the lectures and tickets, visit www.archleague.org, beginning February 1. Friday, March 2 INABA, Jeffrey Inaba, New York and Los Angeles: INABA’s projects range from books and diagrams to installations, creating physical form from abstract content. 5468796 architecture, Johanna Hurme and Sasa Radulovic, Winnipeg: With a focus on housing and public projects, the collaborative office playfully explores the possibilities of architecture within the constraints of modest budgets and materials. Friday, March 9 SCAPE / Landscape Architecture, Kate Orff and Elena Brescia, New York: Through its landscape and urban design practice SCAPE researches new futures for the urban-natural environment. Studio NMinusOne, Christos Marcopoulos and Carol Moukheiber, Toronto: The studio’s work, both built and theoretical, explores the frontier of the digital and real and its effects on the physiologies of occupants of buildings and environments. Friday, March 23 Oyler Wu Collaborative, Dwayne Oyler and Jenny Wu, Los Angeles: Oyler Wu’s installations, pavilions, and façade experimentations are informed by and explore fabrication processes and materials. SsD, Jinhee Park and John Hong, New York, Boston, and Seoul: The firm’s work, from private residences to light sculptures to public buildings, combines research and production to find multivalent expressions from minimal form. Friday, March 30 arquitectura911sc, Jose Castillo and Saidee Springall, Mexico City: The office responds to the rich social and political complexities of Mexico in its wide-ranging work from social housing to urban planning. Atelier TAG, Manon Asselin and Katsuhiro Yamazaki, Montreal: The firm builds primarily in the public realm exploring the civic functions of architecture.  

Gang in the Great Hall

Fresh off winning a MacArthur Fellowship, last night Jeanne Gang gave a lecture at the Great Hall at Cooper-Union, organized by the Architectural League, which emphasized her firm's commitment to material research, sustainability, and collaboration with experts from diverse fields. She spoke about an ongoing research project into possibly restoring the natural flow of the Chicago River, which may have intrigued New York's Planning Commissioner, Amanda Burden, who was among those in the audience. The project, in many ways, mirrors the Bloomberg Administration's citywide sustainability efforts. Amale Andraos, from Work AC, introduced Gang and guided her through some gentle questioning. Andraos praised Studio Gang's civic engagement and the persistent "earnestness" of their work. When asked about mentors, Gang praised her unnamed professors, made a glancing reference to having worked for Rem Koolhaas, and said how much she learns from her employees. The Koolhaas connection, which she shares with Andraos, seemed particularly intriguing. Because though Koolhaas's research intensive process certainly inform's Gang's approach--as it has influenced countless architectural practices around the world--Gang's earnestness and plainspoken Midwestern attitude seems almost diametrically opposed to Rem's persona. She also discussed her Tower of Tubes in Lexington, Kentucky, which, though it was well received in the community, has yet to secure financing. In addition she gave an preview of the firm's contribution to MoMA's forthcoming exhibition Foreclosed, which looks at a post-industrial site in Cicero, Illinois.  And while she emphasized the importance of community engagement, she said the firm has yet to "spring" the proposal on Cicero.