Posts tagged with "architect":

Christian Kerez: Definitions of Space

Often, architectural space is defined by requirements which are totally arbitrary and alien to the discipline of architecture itself. This lecture will focus on architecture and its medium, the three-dimensional space, not in a closed, clearly defined way, but instead in an experimental way that opens up various approaches for defining and thinking about space. Working titles such as atomized space, incidental space, ornamental space, and fluid space, among others, are used to describe architecture in the most distant and abstract way: only with words, deliberately without any images or references, and purely by the effort of thinking to trigger projects - working on the essence of architectural space itself. Christian Kerez was born in 1962 in Maracaibo, Venezuela and obtained his degree in architecture at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. After extensive published work in the field of architectural photography, he opened his own architectural office in Zurich, Switzerland, in 1993. He has been appointed as a visiting professor in design and architecture at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich since 2001, as Assistant Professor since 2003 and as a full professor for design and architecture since 2009. In 2012-13 he led the Kenzo Tange Chair at Harvard University, Cambridge. He participated in the Swiss Pavilion at the Venice Biennale 2016 with the project "Incidental Space." This lecture is sponsored by The Ornamental Metal Institute of New York with support from The Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture of The Cooper Union. 1.5 AIA and New York State CEUs. The event is free and open to the public. General public should reserve a space. Please note first come, first seated; an RSVP does not guarantee admission as we generally overbook to ensure a full house. All registered seats are released 15 minutes before start time, so we recommend that you arrive early.

The Dallas Architecture Forum Presents Lecture by Aga Khan Prize-Winning Architect Marina Tabassum

The Dallas Architecture Forum is pleased to continue its 2017-2018 lecture series with award-winning architect Marina Tabassum, Founder and Principal of Marina Tabassum Architects, in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Tabassum was one of six 2016 winners of the prestigious Aga Khan Award for Architecture for the project Bait-ur-Rouf Mosque in Dhaka. She is the Academic Director of Bengal Institute for Architecture, Landscapes, and Settlements, and has conducted design studios at BRAC University since 2005. Marina Tabassum has lectured and presented her works and ideas of architecture in various prestigious international architecture forums and events in Norway, Australia, France, Switzerland, and the United States. She will be a juror for this year's Architectural Review Emerging Architecture awards in Berlin at the World Architecture Festival.  Tabassum is a visiting professor this year at the Harvard Graduate School of Design and has previously been a visiting professor at the University of Texas at Arlington and BRAC University. http://mtarchitekts.com/ See Additional Media Coverage: The National, The Daily Star https://www.thenational.ae/arts-culture/architect-marina-tabassum-on-her-aga-khan-award-winning-design-for-the-bait-ur-rouf-mosque-in-dhaka-1.160592 http://www.thedailystar.net/wide-angle/marina-tabassum-architect-search-roots-1240831 Tabassum will speak on Wednesday, October 25 at 7:00 p.m., with check-in and reception at 6:15 p.m., at the Magnolia Theater in the West Village. Tickets are $20 per lecture for general admission and $5 for students (with ID). Tickets can be purchased at the door before the lecture. No reservations are needed to attend Forum lectures. Dallas Architecture Forum members receive free admission to all regular Forum lectures as a benefit of membership, and AIA members can earn one hour of CE credit for each lecture. For more information on the Dallas Architecture Forum, visit www.dallasarchitectureforum.org or call 214-764-2406. Season Benefactors for the Dallas Architecture Forum’s 2017-2018 Season are Briggs Freeman Sotheby’s International Realty, D Home | D Magazine and Maharger Development – Reggie Graham. Fall/Winter Series Benefactors are Architectural Lighting Alliance, CORGAN and modmedia, inc // moderndallas.net.    

Archmarathon Awards Event

ARCHMARATHON 2017 is an event dedicated to the world of design that focuses attention on architecture and interior design in Canada, USA, Central and Latin America. In 2017 the objective is to identify a selection of 42 works in this geographic region that make people think about the most important relationship in architecture and interior design: that between design and human beings. Before being a client, a user or broker, human beings are individuals who use, enjoy and experience the end result of the design and construction process, whether it be aimed at giving shape to a chair, an apartment, a building or a city. Buy your daily entrance for ARCHMARATHON Awards 2017 - Miami Beach. The event will take place in the wonderful frame of Faena Forum on October 12, 13 and 14. The days open to visitors are on 13 and 14 October. By registering for the two days, get your free annual subscription to the digital version of Platform Architecture & Design! Do not miss the opportunity to hear and see the best of Contemporary Architecture of the Americas, told directly by architects! There are only 150 tickets available per day. Hurry!
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Product> 2013 Architect’s Holiday Gift Guide

As architects, we know you're overworked and probably underpaid, and we're guessing you haven't had time to draft your holiday wish list quite yet. But don't despair. AN has compiled a list of high-design, unique gift ideas for you and your colleagues, friends, and family members with good taste, most of which are also attainable for budget-conscious buyers. Pianta Karryon Taski Tote drawings and plans in a bespoke leather carrying case. The product's name comes from the Italian word for floor plan, and an phonetic take on the words "carry on." With an adjustable Velcro closure, it can carry rolls of plans from 3 1/2- to 11-inches in diameter. Luxe Carafe Niche Modern  Glass blowers form the smooth curves of this sleek water carafe and drinking glass. At 9 1/2 inches in height, in comes a variety of colors, in addition to clear. A Field Guide to American Houses: The Definitive Guide to Identifying and Understanding America's Domestic Architecture Virginia and Lee Mcalester For the know-it-all on your list, provide some ammunition for their holiday cocktail party conversation arsenal. The second edition is a fully expanded, comprehensive expansion to the original 1984 release with more than 1,600 detailed photographs and line illustrations. S20-L2 Baton Olight For job site traipsing or natural disaster preparedness, this is the perfect gift for the adventurer on your list. Four brightness levels and a strobe setting assure safety assistance across multiple levels and a strong magnet at the back assumes a stationary, spotlight function. An affixed clip also coordinates nicely with pocket protectors. Mirage Shelving Ladies & Gentleman Studio Who isn't up for a good game of smoke and mirrors? Show your sense of humor by giving the look of grandeur at just 30 inches in height. Mirage Hex Corner is wall mounted with a walnut-trimmed cleat, to achieve a seamless, kaleidoscopic effect. Soccket Uncharted Play Give the gift of social change when you buy Soccket, a soccer ball that stores the kinetic of energy of play to power small electronic devices. Each purchase also gives a child the opportunity to join a SOCCKET Team for access to renewable SOCCKET power and an educational curriculum. Beyond the Bridge Think Fabricate Created from an 1879-lithographic print of "balloon view" bridges from Currier and Ives, this series suits the traditionalist, engineer, or Brooklynite on your list. The series include one plate each of the Brooklyn Bridge, Brooklyn Heights, Governor’s Island, and the Brooklyn Navy Yard with Wallabout Bay in the foreground. Charley Harper: An Illustrated Life Todd Oldham If you're looking for vibrant graphics, look no further than Todd Oldham's compilation of Charley Harper's expansive illustrating career. With an intimate interview forward, you'll see these iconic images from your childhood textbooks in a whole new light: Charley Harper was an early supporter of women in the workplace and an avid conservationist. Available in both hard cover and paper back editions. Line/09 Myers Collective For the design-minded women on your list, how about a handcrafted necklace? LA-based architect Jenny Myers designed this 20-inch piece with silk thread that supports brass tubes in unique geometric formations, fastened with a gold clasp and hardware. Sake Set Deborah Ehrlich Collection This sake set, hand-blown from Swedish crystal, would meet any Japanophile's discerning standards. The slim decanter measures 8 1/2 inches in height and 2 inches in diameter, and each cup is a dainty 1 1/3- by 2-inches. AeroPress Aerobie Go ahead and feed the addiction: Coffeeholic and AN managing editor Aaron Seward says its the best he's ever had. Each order comes with the full kit of parts and a supply of specially shaped filters that will keep your caffeine levels sky high for a full year. For an accompanying premium roast, we recommend Gimme!. Vieni via con me Ring Alessi An extension of Trimarchi's La Stanza dello Scirocco collection includes a geometric cocktail ring that measures just under 2 inches. It's stainless steel material is suitable for those on your list with sensitive skin. Paradise Planned: The Garden Suburb and the Modern City by Robert A.M. Stern, David Fishman, and Jacob Tilove Monacelli Press Sure to please any urbanist, this 1,072-page tome contains the definitive history of the garden suburb.  The book chronicles its start in England during the late 18th century and the effects of industrialization and transportation across many cities in the U.S. Bol Sein Sevres For the person who has a tinge of an Oedipal complex or just a liberal sense of humor, the Bol Sein speaks to carnal urges in a porcelain medium. Allegedly, the mold was formed from the bosom of Marie Antoinette during the 18th century for her King and husband.
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Glass House: New Play Explores Fascistic Modernism

The Center for Architecture seems to be on a lively arts kick of late. After presenting Architect, the chamber opera about Louis Kahn just a couple of weeks ago, last Friday the Center staged a reading of Glass House, a new play by Bob Morris and produced by the Center’s Cynthia Kracauer. The show employs a premise that sounds like the start of an ethnic joke: an Arab and his Jewish wife move next door to a WASP and his black wife in an exclusive Connecticut enclave… In the play, Anthony (Fajar Al-Kaisi), an Arab architect pretending to be of an undetermined ethnic origin, moves into his dream house from New York City with his uber-liberal Jewish wife, Abby (Rachel Feldman). Next door lives Tad (Joe Pallister), an establishment WASP, with his African American wife, Jane (Kim Howard), a Fox News aficionado whom Abby calls “the love child of Clarence Thomas and Condolezza Rice.” Anthony is obsessed with early to mid-twentieth century design and fulfills his dream by moving into a Philip Johnson-inspired glass house. Her husband's exacting anal-retentive design aesthetic slowly becomes the bane of Abby’s existence, as do conflicts presented by her new neighbors. What on first glance might threaten to be a production filled with insidery design jargon, turns out to be a rather commercial endeavor with an unmistakable Broadway-striving sheen. The play’s clipped pace and pithy one-liners are as polished and accessible as this season’s hit Other Desert Cities. In the manner that Desert Cities handles politics via a family drama, Glass House handles architecture via neighborhood conflict. As it turns out, Morris was inspired by the work of Desert Cities author Jon Robin Baitz, who once told him that “all theater has a lie at its core.” The play separates several scenes with direct quotations from architects that support the same notion in architecture, as in Frank Lloyd Wright's comment, "The American house is a lie." Here, the lie sits within a glass house. In a phone interview, the playwright described the work as a “boulevard comedy,” a term used to describe a brisk, topical piece. He pointed to Yasmina Reza’s 1995 play Art as one example. Here the topic in question is architecture and all the tics that its practitioners bring to their everyday lives. As Morris is married to a design-obsessive, the play speaks with a certain level of authority. “With mid-century modernism everything is so carefully considered that it becomes a conflict,” said Morris. He even wove a few personal anecdotes drawn directly from scenes at home, particularly an amusing segment where Anthony perfectly repacks Abby’s haphazardly arranged dishwasher. In real life, Morris’s partner told him, “It hurts my feelings when you don’t load the dishwasher properly.” But behind the couple’s “Modernist mailbox” and “Bauhaus bird-feeder,” rests a larger drama of secrets and lies between Abby and Anthony, which a nosy Jane strives to uncover. Anthony’s lie protects his business and social standing in a post-9/11 America. By exposing the lie the play dissects conservative mores of suburban New York while laying bare prejudices hidden within middle-class urban liberalism. While minorities Anthony and Jane guffaw at ethnic jokes, Tad and Abby react stone-faced. But later, Tad admits to enjoying the comfort of an unaltered tuna salad at the town’s clubhouse which excludes Abby and Anthony, and Abby admits to not wanting to pass by black teens on her way into a local shop. “Despite her good intentions her comfort zone doesn’t want to include a bunch of black kids hanging out in front of the deli,” said Morris. Morris, who owns a clean lined house in Bellport, Long Island, said that suburban “strongholds of historic charm” fight to maintain a way of life through appearances.  “I think that’s where architecture fails,” he said. “It calms or titillates, but that’s not the form that these darkest emotional thoughts take.” For all the glory of Johnson’s glass house, the playwright reminds the audience that Johnson rarely spent the night there, preferring a windowless abode elsewhere on the compound. In a not so subtle manner, the author equates Johnson’s well documented Nazi sympathies of his early years to modernism itself:  “When you have an extreme interest in how things should be to be beautiful, there’s an element of fascism to it, and that can transfer to a home when dishes need to be loaded properly.”  
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Architecture Publishers Restructure In Soft Economy UPDATED

While signs of economic recovery are beginning to show for architects, design publishers continue to struggle to adjust to the changing media landscape and the soft economy. The parent companies of The Architect's Newspaper's two major competitors, Architectural Record's McGraw-Hill and Architect's Hanley Wood, both announced major restructurings this week. According to Folio,  McGraw-Hill is folding New York Construction, Midwest Construction, and its other regional titles into Engineering News-Record and turning ENR into a regional publication while eliminating up to 2,000 jobs across the company. At Record, this also meant letting go of some senior editorial staff, AN learned yesterday. Meanwhile, Hanley Wood's president, Peter Goldstone, has been let go and his position has been eliminated, Folio also reported. UPDATE: A spokesperson for McGraw-Hill wrote to dispute that the company is eliminating 2,000 jobs. While she declined to give a number, she said that the 2,000 figure is, "completely inaccurate." She also clarified that ENR will "continue to be a national publication, but now it also has regional supplements."

Krisel Premier Tomorrow

Famed California modernist William Krisel is getting his day in the sun tomorrow. A documentary about his life and career, called William Krisel, Architect, is premiering as part of Palm Springs Modernism week at the Camelot Theater.  The 86 minute film, directed by Jake Gorst, tracks, as the above preview suggests, a 60-year career in which Krisel built over 40,000 housing units and countless other buildings. And read our next issue for a Q+A with the designer, in which he talks about his latest ventures, his career, and his very favorite topic: the ailing state of the architecture profession.
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Architect as.. Indiana Jones?

TV program developer William Wiegman is looking for a sexy architect (yes, that does exist) to host a new reality show he's pitching that "takes viewers on an exploration of the world's most famous rooftops." Details on the show are still vague (the producers don't want anyone stealing their ideas...), but according Wiegman, the "architect must be photogenic, male, 30-45, adventurous, and have an engaging personality on-camera. He must possess the physical agility of a rock climber and the intellectual prowess of an architectural historian." Good idea, because this architect needs to be filmed standing on building roofs, among other things.  Send resume and photos to williamwiegman@hotmail.com. Deadline for submissions is September 20.