Posts tagged with "ARC":

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Product> Grand Openings: Window Walls and Doors That Bring the Outside In

Even in four-season climates, the allure of outdoor living endures. Meticulously engineered for ease of operation, structural soundness, and weather-tightness, large-scale openings offer a seamless transition between indoors and out. Sliding, telescoping, or rising mechanisms give designers—and their clients—a choice of access that complements their architecture. Arc Sky-Frame This sliding curved window can be double- or triple-glazed. Multiple curves can be combined, or integrated with straight runs. Slide/Fold Duratherm Light, ventilation, and privacy are achieved through a strategic use of louvers on the slide/fold door system, here custom fabricated in teak. Fourteen wood species are offered for this configuration. Vitrocsa Invisible Wall System Vitrocsa With only ¾-inch vertical sightlines for dual-glazed sliding doors, this system creates a nearly invisible operable wall. Available as horizontal sliding windows and doors, vertically sliding windows, and pivoting doors. Solarlux Cero A 1 1/3-inch profile and a concealed track system facilitate a near-seamless appearance. Capable of supporting panels up to 13 feet by 1 9 feet with a weight of 2,200 pounds. Architectural Openings Architectural Openings Doors with lift-slide and swing mechanisms combine with tilt-turn windows in this custom mahogany curtain wall. Lift/Slide Panda Windows & Doors With a maximum panel size of 20 feet tall by 10 feet wide, these thermally broken lift-and-slide doors feature an extruded aluminum profile and polyamide iso-bars. E1200 Elephant Doors System CRL Operable storefront sections slide behind fixed sections of this opening system. Suitable for conditions that require a wide opening that can be easily converted into a fixed panel, a wall, or a wall with a door system inside. Multi-Slide Door System La Cantina Doors This aluminum thermally controlled multi-slide door system features AAMA certified wheels, which allow for a symmetrical, low-profile bottom rail. Hydrau-Lift Bifold Doors Hufcor These automated bi-fold doors fold vertically up and outward when retracted, leaving a clear opening and minimizing the amount of headroom needed inside the building. Standard Grade Multiwall Sheets Polygal Featuring a UV coating to protect the polycarbonate panels against yellowing, the rigid sheet structure provides extra strength under wind and snow loads.
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Christie’s ARC Accounting Questioned

New Jersey Governor Chris Cristie's tunnel numbers are being questioned (Courtesy crooksandliars.com). The accounting methods that New Jersey Governor Chris Christie used to put the kibosh on new cross Hudson train tunnel were called in to question in a report released today, the New York Times reports. Christie said that the project, called the Access to the Regions Core (ARC), could run up to $14 billion, but independent Congressional investigators found that it would cost no more than $10 billion. He also claimed that New Jersey would foot more than 70 percent of the bill, but investigators said it would have been more like 14 percent. It should be noted that a constant Christie critic, Senator Frank R. Lautenberg, commissioned the report. No matter, it seems to be no skin off the governor’s nose. NJ.com grabbed a quotable quote from the governor speaking in New York this morning at the George W. Bush Institute Conference on Taxes and Economic Growth: “So when they want to build a tunnel to the basement of a Macy's and stick the New Jersey taxpayers with a bill of $3 to $5 billion over, no matter how much the administration yells and screams, you have to say no.”
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And the World Architecture Festival Winners Are . . .

The World Architecture Festival is in its third year of existence, and, despite the worldwide recession, seems to have more attendees, trade show participants, and strong projects in its awards program. In what is surely a sign of the times, however, there seem to be many more strong projects in the “future” category than completed buildings. As it has been for the past three years, AN was the event’s American media sponsor, and this year I juried projects in the category of “Future Health and Education Buildings.”

The “future” presented several problems for the jury, as the various projects were all in different states of completion. In fact, one of the buildings the jury selected, the Kuwait Children’s Hospital by Madrid-based AGi Architects, had no window openings on its facade—at least not yet—or a credible entry into the complex. Nonetheless, we decided to give it an award for its adventurous design, in hopes that the client would actually see the project through to completion. What it will look like at the end is anyone’s guess, but at this point it stood out in the Health category. We gave our Future Education award to another Kuwait project, Sabah Al-Salem University in Kuwait, designed by Perkins+Will’s office in New York City. For this project, the future seems much nearer, as it was more developed and seems to have financing in place. It was recommended for its balancing of large-scale planning issues with small-scale detailing—the building’s facade was particularly well thought out, as it creatively dealt with the harsh climate of Kuwait. When this project moved through to the final round, however, where it was considered for the award as the outstanding future project of the year, it was attacked by jurists Will Alsop and Charles Jencks for its monolithic facade, which uses a repetitive flange system to shade 80 percent of the surface much of the day and thus reduce energy consumption in this hot climate. I also think Alsop actually wanted a brighter color on the facade (it’s white) and asked the Perkins+Will presenter Anthony Fieldman: “Do you really like the building?” To his credit, Fieldman stood his ground with a firm Yankee “Yes!” In a final comment that would only come from a Brit, Alsop asked Fieldman, “What’s it like to work in a country that does not allow the consumption of alcohol?” Thank god for the British! The festival’s Best Building winner was no surprise: Zaha’s Maxxi Museum in Rome. Zaha may stand triumphant in Barcelona, but Americans should be proud of the Los Angeles (and Palestine) based firm Suisman Urban Design, which won Best Future Project for the ARC Plan for occupied Palestine. Winning the student category was the Campus Catalyst Project in Port Au Prince, Haiti, designed by Harvard University students Robin Bankert, Michael Murphy, Caroline Shannon, and Joseph Wilfong. According to the jury’s notes, this project offered a powerful statement, built around the premise of education as a driver for reinventing the landscape after the 2010 earthquake. The project focused on practical applications like agronomy and carpentry, while developing education centers on unoccupied or damaged land adjacent to the current tent villages, where they are most needed. The team won a $16,000 prize courtesy of AECOM, which sponsored the student competition. Among the other category winners recognized by the juries: Check the WAF winners site for a full list of winning category projects, and check back here for more on the overall winners.