Posts tagged with "Apple":

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Foster-designed Apple store proposed for historic Carnegie Library in D.C.

The Carnegie Library at Mount Vernon Square, a historic building next to Washington’s Convention Center, is likely to become the home of a flagship Apple store designed by Foster + Partners of London. Events D.C., the convention and sports authority for the District of Columbia, last week entered into a letter of intent with Apple to lease portions of the 63,000-square-foot library, which is under its jurisdiction. If negotiations are successful, the development will reimagine the historic site for the 21st century, while remaining consistent with its original purpose. The plan calls for the tech giant to renovate the 1903 library at 801 K. Street N. W. and pay market-rate rent to operate a store designed by Foster + Partners, which was founded by Norman Foster and also designed Apple stores in San Francisco and London. “This is an extremely important repositioning of an iconic building—a building whose original purpose was about community, information and sharing of knowledge,” said Max Brown, chairman of the board of Events DC. "Amid rapid change in our city, we are confident the space can become a true blend of the square’s past and future.” “We are excited that Apple is interested in joining our growing tech ecosystem,” said Washington Mayor Muriel Bowser. “The store’s proposed location… will link D.C.’s rich history to our continued economic renaissance, will demonstrate the strength of our retail market, and will tell companies across the globe that the District is open for business.” According to Events DC, the proposed arrangement calls for Apple to lease portions of the library’s ground floor and basement levels under a 10-year lease, with two five-year options to renew. Events DC will have certain rights to use non-retail areas of the library for special events, and Apple will “co-locate” in the library with its existing tenant, The Historical Society of Washington. “A partnership with Apple would be a tremendous opportunity for Events DC, for the Historical Society, and for the District,” said Gregory A. O’Dell, president and chief executive officer of Events DC. “Not only can this new partnership cement the Shaw neighborhood as a convention and entertainment district in the city, but it can also drive economic impact with substantial revenue opportunities. Designed by Ackerman & Ross in the Beaux Arts style, the Carnegie Library was one of thousands of libraries funded by steel industry titan Andrew Carnegie, and it was the first fully-integrated public building in Washington, D.C. In 1999, Congress granted $2 million and a 99-year lease to the historical society to use the building as a history museum about Washington, D.C. After $20 million worth of renovations funded by local donors, the library has served as the home of the historical society’s exhibits, public programs, and renowned Kiplinger Research Library since 2003. The area around the library has seen rapid growth in recent years, with the opening of the Marriott Marquis Washington and a series of new restaurants, stores and housing developments. In 2014, Carnegie Library was considered as a new home for the International Spy Museum, which had outgrown its current location at 800 F. Street N. W. But the museum and its architect, MGA Partners, wanted to build additions to the existing structure and their plan was turned down by historic preservationists. Now that Events D. C. has shown support for Apple’s project, plans still must be approved by the National Capital Planning Commission and Washington’s Historic Preservation Review Board before construction can begin. It would be the second Apple store in Washington, after one in Georgetown.
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Here’s what Apple’s headquarters in London’s Battersea Power Station will look like

With design courtesy of British firm Wilkinson Eyre, images of Apple's new London headquarters inside Battersea Power Station have been revealed. The decision by Apple to move into the vacant Giles Gilbert Scott–designed building was announced late last month but now Apple fans can get a glimpse of what the Californian tech giant will be moving into. As part of the move, 1,400 current Apple employees will start work inside Battersea Power Station. Occupying 40 percent of the interior space, Apple's offices will span six floors within the power station's central boiler house. The original architect of the structure, Gilbert Scott, was renowned for his use of brick and application of art deco styling to his power stations. Following a similar approach to that of Herzog & de Meuron, the Swiss duo who renovated Bankside Power Station (also by Scott and located eastward down the river Thames) into the Tate Modern, Wilkinson Eyre has paid homage to the original structure and its turbine halls. "Retaining the power station’s sense of scale and visual drama is key to the project," the firm said on their website. Battersea Power Station remains the largest brick structure in London since its construction in 1933. "Large volume spaces expose the historic fabric internally and juxtapose new and old construction... The turbine halls are the heroic interior spaces of the power station, and the vast walls of polished tiles in 'Turbine Hall A' were once likened to a Greek temple. The magnificent space is equal in size to the turbine hall at Tate Modern and many of the original finishes and features survive." Three floors of shopping outlets will occupy the turbine halls and central boiler house. Condos will be located above the retail space being housed in two low-level annexes that lay on the east and west wings of the building. In between this, a triple-height "leisure level" will offer space for events as well as a cinema and hotel. Offices, meanwhile, are due to be situated above this. Six stories of office space have been arranged by Wilkinson Eyre around a grand atrium. An icon of the London skyline, the power station's four white chimneys will frame a coterie of contemporary residential villas which surround a garden square on the roof. The chimneys will also include a glass elevator (it is unknown if all four will) which will climb to a viewing deck offering vistas across London. The project is set to cost $1.26 billion, due for completion in 2021.
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Apple to create new London home in Battersea Power Station

Tech giant Apple has its eyes set on moving into Battersea Power Station in south London. Currently vacant, the power station was designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott in 1929, completed 1935, and is a much-loved landmark of the capital. Apple plans to occupy 500,000 square feet of interior (40 percent of the space available) with offices, spanning six floors in the power station’s central boiler house. The building has stood empty after 1983 when it was decommissioned, however, its art deco brick decor and iconic quadrangle of chimneys have lived on to become a cultural icon. Gilbert Scott's work was used on the cover of Pink Floyd’s album “Animals” and also in the Batman film “The Dark Knight.” After many redevelopment attempts, including a hotel design by designer Ron Arad and a stadium proposition from Chelsea Football Club, the power station is being redeveloped by a Malaysian consortium. The group is well underway with a project that will see high-end luxury condos, offices, shops and restaurants fill the 42-acre vicinity. Apple plans to have moved in by 2021 by which time employees will have access to the site from the London Underground Northern Line's new extension, as well as from existing overground services from Battersea Park station. The U.K.'s recently appointed Chancellor to the Exchequer, Philip Hammond, commented on the deal, remarking how it is “another vote of confidence in the UK economy.” “Apple’s decision further strengthens London’s position as a global technology hub and demonstrates how the UK is at the forefront of the next steps in the tech revolution,” he said. A spokesman for Apple has said the move would mean "its entire team [could] work and collaborate in one location while supporting the renovation of a neighbourhood rich with history". "This is a great opportunity to have our entire team working and collaborating in one location, while supporting the renovation of a neighborhood with rich history," said Apple in a statement. Meanwhile, Battersea Power Station Development Company’s chief executive Rob Tincknell added: “We are delighted Apple chose to make this their home in 2021. It is a testament to not only the fantastic building but the wider regeneration of the 42-acre site, which offers a carefully curated mix of homes, businesses and leisure amid extraordinary open spaces and new transport links."
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AN gets a glimpse at the new Apple Store coming to the WTC Transportation Hub

Tomorrow, Apple will open their newest stores inside Santiago Calatrava's World Trade Center hub. Currently only Apple employees and construction staff are allowed inside the premises but The Architect's Newspaper (AN) was able to get a sneak peak. The store was designed by Bohlin Cywinski Jackson's San Francisco office. The firm is also behind the Palo Alto (Stanford) Apple Store, as well as six New York City locations: Upper West Side, Fifth Avenue, Soho, West 14th, Upper East Side, and the newest Williamsburg store in Brooklyn. With regards to their Midtown glass box design unveiled in 2006, the cubic creation spurred hysteria among Apple fans and the media, though the furore surrounding their latest Apple outlet has been slightly more subdued. For two years it's been confirmed this Apple Store would be part of the Westfield shopping complex; it will join eight other official Apple Stores across the five boroughs. The closest will be in Soho, a mere one-and-a-half miles away on 103 Prince Street. While Bohlin Cywinski Jackson doesn't specialize in retail design, the firm has established a pedigree of producing a minimalist aesthetic synonymous with Apple Stores across the globe. Here in Calatrava's all-white $4 billion “Oculus”—seemingly taylor-made for an Apple store location—the firm has not bucked this trend. Employing a glass wall that spans the store's frontage, the transparent entrance emulates their two previous designs for Apple outlets in the city. The result is, as always, a light and apparently spacious interior. Two large screens displaying products are placed at either end of the store, while Apple's typical wooden furnishings fill the open space. To the far left, a staircase can be seen heading to a floor above, however as of yet, there are no clues as to where this leads. For now, those dying to know will just have to wait until 12:00 p.m. tomorrow when the store officially opens.
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Foster + Partners-designed flagship Apple store opens in San Francisco

British architect Norman Foster has seen his firm's new flagship Apple store open in San Francisco. Located at Union Square, the new store features 42-foot high sliding glass doors that open out onto the 2.6 acre plaza "creating unprecedented urban permeability." Built to set a precedent for all following Apple stores, Foster's building replaces the old outlet which opened in the city twelve years ago. The design was realized working alongside Apple’s Chief Design Officer Jonathan Ive and Senior Vice President of Retail and Online Stores, Angela Ahrendts. “This is an incredible site on Union Square and a chance to create a new public plaza. We have created the most inspiring and stimulating space imaginable, blurring the inside and outside,” said Stefan Behling of  Foster + Partners. “It is possible to experience Apple's extraordinary products and services while taking in the buzzing Union Square on one side and relaxing in the contemplative quiet of the new plaza on the other.” The flagship store is one of three Apple stores designed by Foster + Partners; the two others are in Turkey and China. The Union Square store is also close to Apple's headquarters at Cupertino, which are also being designed by the firm. This latest store however, represents a shift in approach to the retail typology that Apple is adopting. A new learning zone called the "Forum" will become a space for entertainment and teaching. The new space was awarded a prime location on a mezzanine, open to most of the store and against a video wall. At the back of the Forum is the "Genius Grove," a space filled with trees where Apple Genius employees will be on hand.
Glass sliding doors are used on both sides of the store. To the rear, an open public space has been filled with art and offers Wi-Fi. Seating and vegetation form a gathering space outside the store. Meanwhile, the Ruth Asawa fountain, a well-established piece of historical San Franciscan heritage, has been relocated to the steps that lead down to Stockton Street. In 2013, Foster + Partners' design had to be revised after their original plan hadn't catered for the fountain. This space is also flanked by a standing of trees and a 65-foot-by-50-foot green wall planted with Ficus Repens plants. This is split by a waterfall on the west side which also forms a backdrop to the  fountain. Behind this, and well hidden away, is the "Boardroom" which will be used for meetings and business purposes.
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Apple shows love to New York’s historic neighborhoods and the Landmarks Conservancy takes notice

The New York Landmarks Conservancy is honoring Apple with its 2016 Chairman's Award. The award, to be given at a fundraising luncheon where individual tickets start at $500, honors the company for "their contribution to preserving, restoring, and repurposing notable historic structures in New York City." Although Apple's New York flagship store, on Fifth Avenue between 58th and 59th streets, is recognized widely for its modern glass cube, the company has four stores in historically significant locations around the city. Apple has a shop in Grand Central Terminal, a New York City landmark, and stores within the Soho, Gansevoort Market, and Upper East Side historic districts. With 700,000 travellers passing through Grand Central Terminal, that store is the most heavily trafficked of the historic four, Apple Insider speculates. In March, the NYLC will recognize the company's commitment to historic preservation (or locating stores in historic areas, as there is no explicit preservation agenda in the stores' design). The Chairman's Award was started in 1988 to recognize "exceptional commitment to the protection and preservation of the rich architectural heritage of New York." The NYLC is different from the New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission: the latter is a city government group that decides which districts and structures receive recognition for the historic, cultural, or architectural merits and subsequent protection under local historic preservation laws. The former is a nonprofit advocacy organization that protects the architectural heritage of New York City by advocating for preservation-friendly policy at the state, local, and national level; running workshops and providing technical assistance; and providing loans and grants for preservation of individual structures, sites, and neighborhoods.
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Norman Foster plants a new Apple Store in the heart of Chicago

Foster + Partners has revealed initial images of a proposed Apple store at the intersection of Michigan Avenue and the Chicago River. The new store will replace their existing Michigan Avenue flagship store six blocks to the north. Echoing the company’s 5th Avenue store in New York, the design calls for a large, mostly glass structure with an expanded retail space below ground. Unlike the 5th Avenue store, and more akin to Foster’s recent Aix-en-Provence, France Apple iteration, the new Chicago Store will feature a light solid roof suspended on two large columns. Located on, and below, Pioneer Square, the store will have one of the most visible locations in the city, surrounded by some of Chicago’s most iconic architectural landmarks. The square itself is flanked by the Tribune Tower to the north, the modernist Bruce Graham designed 401 North Michigan Avenue (formerly the Equitable Building) to the East, and the Wrigley Building immediately across Michigan Avenue. The view up the river to the west will also include the Trump Tower, Marina City, and Mies’ AMA Plaza (formerly IBM Plaza), making this location one of the most recognized tourist, not to mention retail, locations in the city. The 20,000-square-foot retail space will occupy an unused cafeteria at Lower Michigan Avenue. The store will also engage with the infrequently used Riverwalk along the north bank of the river. New balustrades and stairs will be added, as well as the 34-foot-tall glass wall of the store itself. According to representatives from Foster + Partners at a recent courtesy presentation to the City Planning Commission, there will be no retail at the surface Pioneer Square level, with the 14-foot-above-grade glass structure acting as a grand entrance. The city has already approved the project, and construction is planned to begin next year.
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Apple to lease HOK’s Curvy Central & Wolfe Campus in Sunnyvale, California

News broke last week that Apple plans to move into another spaceship of a building, the Central & Wolfe Campus in Sunnyvale, California designed by HOK. The Silicon Valley Business Journal reported that the company leased the 777,000-square-foot building just a few miles from its Norman Foster–designed, doughnut-shaped HQ and praised the curvilinear design for its non-box-like silhouette. The HOK and Landbank project, which has been on AN’s radar since 2014, uses its curves to give employees (Apple will house up to 4,000 here) better visual and physical access to the outdoors. The 18-acre site includes 9 acres of ground-level open space with 2 miles of outdoor trails and 90,000-square-foot rooftop garden. There are no plans as yet for a viewing platform for the curious public. “It was critical that every major design element that went into the campus had to raise the user experience bar. In this case, the ‘users’ include companies, their employees, surrounding communities, and Mother Nature,” Scott Jacobs, CEO of Landbank, told AN Back in May 2014. In the same piece, Paul Woodford, HOK's senior VP and director of design, noted that the firm had to challenge preconceptions about what is “leasable, efficient, and excitable.” The bet paid off. The Apple lease does raise the question of whether the HOK design will remain part of the deal. Real estate reporter for the Journal wrote: “One caveat: It’s unclear whether the project will be built according to that design, from architecture firm HOK, or if Apple and Landbank will want to modify it in some way. At this time there’s no indication it will change substantially, and indeed Landbank has made the signature look a key selling point, with a website that highlights the out-of-the-box design.”
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Apple is planning to build a viewing platform and visitors center so you can gaze upon its Foster-designed headquarters

Apple's upcoming doughnut-shaped flying saucer of a headquarters is steadily taking shape in Cupertino, California. The Norman Foster–designed, $5 billion complex obviously strays from the typical office park setup of clusters of boxy, generic buildings, but despite its starchitect design, it has attracted plenty of criticism for how little it engages with the community and the non-Apple employees who walk among us. But apparently that's not the whole story. The Silicon Business Journal went digging through city documents and uncovered plans for a visitor's center at the headquarters which includes a viewing platform where civilians can look out on the campus and imagine what's happening inside the curved walls. (Hopefully it includes boosting iPhone battery life.) "The plans show a super-modern glass-walled structure topped by a carbon-fiber roof with extended eaves, punctuated by large skylights," reported the site. "On the ground floor: A 2,386-square-foot cafe and 10,114-square-foot store 'which allows visitors to view and purchase the newest Apple products.' Stairs and elevators take visitors to the roof level, about 23 feet up." The campus is expected to be completed in late 2016. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eB6_XkUFpAc
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Called out by Greenpeace for lack of transparency, Amazon commits to building solar farm in Virginia to power its data centers

E-commerce giant Amazon is under fire from groups to catch up to its tree-hugging counterparts. To boost its "green" credentials, the company has announced the building of a new solar farm in coal-reliant Virginia to power its numerous data centers in the region. After scoring abysmally in a Greenpeace report that ranked big tech firms by renewable energy achievements and transparency, Amazon announced a partnership with Community Energy on June 10 to build an 80-megawatt solar farm in Virginia’s Eastern Shore in Accomack County. It will be the largest solar facility in the state to date. Greenpeace called out Amazon in May for not elaborating on its plans to achieve 100 percent renewable energy. “Amazon lags behind its competitors in using renewable energy for its cloud-based computer servers,” Todd Larsen, executive co-director of Green America, told EcoWatch. “Unlike most of its competitors, it fails to publish a corporate responsibility or sustainability reporting, and it fails to disclose its emissions and impacts to the Carbon Disclosure Project. We are calling on Amazon.com to take steps to be transparent about its emissions and to rapidly move to renewable energy.” In April, Amazon reported that 25 percent of its global infrastructure is powered by renewable energy. Its goal, by 2016, is to raise that figure to 40 percent. The Greenpeace report, Clicking Clean: Building a Green Internet, showed Amazon lagging far behind peers such as Google and Apple, the latter of which runs all of its data centers on renewables and earned a top score in the report. Amazon’s solar farm will deliver about 170,000 megawatt hours of electricity, enough to power 15,000 homes. While Greenpeace applauded Amazon on its prudent move, the environmental group estimates that the solar farm’s output would suffice to meet only a “single-digit percentage” of Amazon’s total energy demand in Virginia, according to Fast Company. The tech company’s data centers in that region are the lifeblood of its Amazon Web Services (AWS), used by some of the Internet’s biggest names including The New York Times, The Huffington Post, Buzzfeed, Pinterest, and Tumblr. The energy demands for such large-scale cloud computing are understandably mammoth. Last January, Amazon announced that it would build a 150 megawatt wind farm in Benton County, Indiana, which has a higher capacity. Earlier this year, AWS customers including Tumblr, HuffPo, and Hootsuite wrote to Amazon asking it to be more transparent about its environmental reporting.

Eavesdrop> Sunny Apple: Cupertino HQ makes a big buy for solar power

http://youtu.be/tZTRTv56k58 We have given Apple flack for the suburban nature of its new campus in Cupertino. But we’ve been impressed with the company’s recent attempts to make things more eco-friendly, adding shuttles, bike lanes, a bus transit center, and walking paths. Now we hear Apple is purchasing 130 megawatts worth of energy a year from First Solar. The purchase will power the new HQ as well as all of its other California offices, a large data center, and the 52 retail stores in the state.
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Video> Drone footage shows construction progress at Norman Foster’s Apple Campus

[beforeafter]apple-video1 apple-video2[/beforeafter]   Perhaps the most hyped corporate campus in history, Apple's Norman Foster–designed campus in Cupertino, is starting to come out of the ground. YouTube user jmcminn recently uploaded a video of a (loud) drone flying over the top secret construction site, where work began a few months ago and should continue through 2016. The circular foundations appear to be over a quarter complete. The 2.8 million square foot, 12,000-employee campus was first revealed in 2011 and joins ambitious new Silicon Valley campuses by Samsung, Google, Facebook, Nvidia and more in a remarkable architectural run in the area. Wondering if people are interested? The Apple construction page has almost 3 million views. For more construction news visit the city of Cupertino's update page. Other partners on the project are engineers Arup and landscape architects Olin (managing over 10,000 square feet of landscaped space).