Posts tagged with "Ann Arbor":

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Mónica Ponce de León and Oyler Wu Collaborative are among 2018 ACADIA Award winners

ACADIA, or the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture, established the ACADIA Awards of Excellence to recognize outstanding individuals and practices that think critically about the impact and possibilities of computer-aided design. This year, the ACADIA Awards recipients, including Mónica Ponce de León and Oyler Wu Collaborative, will present their work at the conference titled Recalibration: On Imprecision and Infidelity at the Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico City from October 18–20. Dean of Princeton University School of Architecture Mónica Ponce de León won the Teaching Award of Excellence. Ponce de León is a Venezuelan-American architect who is also a renowned educator. She is the founding principal of MPdL Studio, which has officesin New York, Boston, and Ann Arbor. Prior to her deanship at Princeton, she was dean of University of Michigan’s Taubman College and a professor at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design (GSD). The awards committee commended her for the “integration of digital technologies into architectural education.” Jenny Wu and Dwayne Oyler, partners at Oyler Wu Collaborative, were awarded with the Digital Practice Award of Excellence. The L.A.-based, award-winning firm is widely recognized for its expertise in material research and digital fabrication. The firm is known for projects such as The Exchange in Columbus, IN, the 2013 Beijing Biennale installation named The Cube, and their installations and pavilions with SCI-Arc. The partners are both currently teaching at SCI-Arc and Harvard GSD. Other awards included the Innovative Academic Program Award of Excellence, given to the Institute of Advanced Architecture Catalonia; the Innovative Research Award of Excellence bestowed upon NVIDIA robotics researcher Dr. Madeline Gannon; and the Society Award of Excellence won by Association for Robots in Architecture co-founders Sigrid Brell-Cokcan and Johannes Braumann. Check out the complete list of winners here.
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T+E+A+M simulates natural processes to make spectacularly synthetic materials

Wrangling with the issues of pollution and industrial waste, Ann Arbor, Michigan–based collective T+E+A+M is pushing forward with innovative approaches to appropriating and reinterpreting the industrial relics of America’s Rust Belt. T+E+A+M draws upon the postindustrial landscape—often Detroit—as a source of inspiration, places where disused materials are salvaged, recast, and used as architectural tools and standalone structures. Based out of the University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, T+E+A+M is a collaboration between architects Thom Moran, Ellie Abrons, Adam Fure, and Meredith Miller. Miller and Moran are developing an innovative construction material they call “Post Rock.” Post Rock is a lab-made re-creation of the naturally occurring plastiglomerate—a relatively new geological substance composed of discarded plastic, sedimentary granules, and other debris. The team simulates this process and speculates how to build architectural forms from the agglomerated matter. The inherent durability of petrochemical polymers and sedimentary products strengthens the case for their use in construction. Post Rock consists of a mix of polymer and inorganic sources. The recycled product is formed either "in situ" where the materials are stacked and thermocast, or as “clastic,” which derives its cylindrical shape from rotational thermoforming conducted in the lab. Through three speculative design projects envisioned with digital rendering, Miller and Moran have upscaled their Post Rock prototypes into architectural works. Three categories—Urban Beach, Agribusiness, and Suburban Domestic—are composed of three distinct mixes of polymers and inorganic sources. Unveiled at the 2017 Designing Material Innovation Exhibition at California College of the Arts, the Clastic Order is a “new architectural order” fabricated from stacked and thermocast Post Rock. By casting the recycled material to create monolithic columns, T+E+A+M utilizes a process similar to a slipforming technique that entails the constant pouring of materials, creating new layers of structure. T+E+A+M described this casting process as one “based on material behavior under heat and gravity,” allowing for each monolith to possess multiple physical characteristics reflecting the ratios of components, colors, and textures found in each cast. The utility of the Clastic Order as a construction technology is yet to be fully tested. However, Moran hopes that it could be strengthened to fully merge the compositional with the decorative and structural in the spirit of the Roman arch. He views their approach as a radical solution that envisions remanufactured waste products as a tappable and nearly unlimited resource of “building material similar to iron and concrete.” T+E+A+M has ongoing projects, such as Clastic Order, that demonstrate promising decorative and structural uses of these refashioned industrial leftovers. They are currently researching the potential scaling-up of their techniques, and the development of a patent covering the use of their plastic-based materials as a form of facade and interior cladding. Moran acknowledged that while these approaches are wholly plausible, they will require testing and research.
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17-story tower in Ann Arbor, Michigan gets air rights approval

The City Council of Ann Arbor, Michigan, has voted in favor of selling air rights to a project that is set to become one of the tallest in the city. The Collective is proposed to be a 17-story mixed-use development designed by Evanston, Illinois–based Myefski Architects and developed by Chicago-based Core Spaces. The 352,000-square-foot development will include 360 residential units, 131 hotel rooms, 20,000 square feet of office space, and 3,000 square feet of retail space. At its base, a designed streetscape and 12,000-square-foot public plaza will interact with the building's structure. Located in the busy Midtown District, the tower will also include terraces and balconies overlooking the public space. The .8-acre site where The Collective will stand is above a city-owned underground parking garage. In 2015 the city requested proposals for the site, signaling that it wanted to sell the air rights for a development. The Core/Myefski team was one of nine to submit, and one of the two shortlisted. After a series of public input meetings, the current proposal was picked in early 2016. It took another 15 months of negotiations between the team and the city to arrive at this week’s vote. The approval means the city is willing to sell the air rights for $10 million. Five million dollars of that money is already earmarked for affordable housing in the city. “The City and residents of Ann Arbor put this in motion many years ago. They had a vision for this dynamic downtown location that involved addressing the needs of the community,” said President and Principal John Myefski. “In addition to a placemaking, landmark building, this development is going to boost the quality of life for many Ann Arbor residents.”
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Exhibition on computational design and architecture opens in tandem with ACADIA conference

As part of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) 2016 Conference held at the University of Michigan’s Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: DATA, DESIGNERS AND COGNITIVE MACHINES will feature work that showcases the methods, processes, and techniques discussed at the conference. The show, held in the 3,000-square-foot Liberty Research Annex Gallery in downtown Ann Arbor, Michigan, will be divided into two sections: A “Juried Projects Exhibition” and a Curated Topic Exhibition.” The juried portion of the show will display work that was part of an open call this past spring, while the curated half of the show will be comprised of video and physical project installations. The work will also be published in a full-color catalogue. The exhibition opening will coincide with the ACADIA 2016 Conference, with an opening reception on October 27 at 7:00 p.m. at the Liberty Research Annex Gallery.

POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: DATA, DESIGNERS AND COGNITIVE MACHINES Liberty Research Annex Gallery 305 West Liberty Street Ann Arbor, Michigan Conference: October 27–29, 2016, Exhibition: October 19–November 4

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Mario Carpo and Elizabeth Diller Confirmed as Keynote Speakers for ACADIA 2016

This years ACADIA 2016 conference: Posthuman Frontiers: Data, Designers & Cognitive Machines has announced Mario Carpo (Reyner Banham Professor of Architectural Theory and History, the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL London) and Elizabeth Diller (founding partner of Diller Scofidio + Renfro) as confirmed keynote speakers. In 1999, working alongside Ricardo Scofidio, Ms. Diller was awarded the MacArthur Foundation “genius” award, becoming the first in her filed to do so. Now, Diller will also be receiving the ACADIA 2016 Lifetime Achievement award, an esteemed accolade that represents recognition by colleagues worldwide of consistent contributions and impact on the field of architectural computing and design culture. Co-Founder and Design Partner of Future Cities Lab, San Francisco and recently elected member to the ACADIA Board of Directors and ACADIA President, Jason Kelly Johnson cited how "Diller’s pioneering work at the intersections of architecture, art, technology and philosophy" made her an "ideal" choice as a keynote speaker. Johnson went on to add that "the ACADIA community will celebrate Diller's critical explorations integrating design, computation, and theory into a radically inventive and culturally relevant body of work from installations to buildings to urban landscapes." Mario Carpo was also seen by Johnson as a pivotal speaker for ACADIA 2016. "Carpo's keynote will bring a much needed theoretical and historical perspective to the conference," Johnson noted, going on to say, "His research is a catalyst for critical discussions related to digital design, technology and culture."  Carpo has a strong pedigree in the field of architectural research, focusing on architectural theory, cultural history, and the history of media and information technology. Notable publications include The Alphabet and the AlgorithmThe Digital Turn in Architecture 1992-2012 and his award-winning opus: Architecture in the Age of Printing which has been translated into several languages.

The conference will focus on design work and research carried out in the fields of practice and academia  that relate to "procedural design, designed environments and autonomous machines". More specifically, ACADIA 2016 will concentrate on contemporary trends in computational design that has been used to develop "quasi-cognitive machines" and "integration of software, information, fabrication and sensing to generate mechanisms for interfacing with the physical realm." Papers that touch on relative disciplines such as material science, biology, art, computer graphics, civil engineering, and human-computer interaction have been called to contribute to the discussion.

"Every year the ACADIA conferences bring together a world-class group of designers, architects, engineers, fabricators and thinkers exploring the intersection of computation, digital technologies and architecture," said Johnson. "In North America it has become the event to present, explore and debate emerging ideas in the field."

This years event will be held at the University of Michigan Taubman College in Ann Arbor, Michigan and the conference itself will run from October 27 - 29, 2016.
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University of Michigan plans $28 million architecture building expansion

Five years ago, the University of Michigan shelved its plans to expand its Art and Architecture Building. Now, a bit further along on the country’s economic recovery, the University said this week it would build a $28 million addition. University of Michigan's Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning will be the primary tenants of the building, which U-M has tapped Integrated Design Solutions and Preston Scott Cohen to design. Located on U-M’s North Campus, it will also house the Penny W. Stamps School of Art and Design. The new wing will be named for Alfred Taubman, the architecture college’s namesake, who donated $12.5 million toward the addition. Plans for a $13 million, 16,300-square-feet addition were originally drawn up in 2007, but administrators scuttled that project after the financial crisis. Now with twice the budget, the design is hotly anticipated on campus.
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On View> Doris Duke’s Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art at the University of Michigan Museum of Art

Doris Duke’s Shangri La: Architecture, Landscape, and Islamic Art University of Michigan Museum of Art 525 South State Street, Ann Arbor, MI Through May 4 Following a 1935 honeymoon that brought her to Morocco, Syria, Iran, Pakistan, India, and Indonesia, enigmatic heiress Doris Duke began work on Shangri-La, her paean to Islamic art and architecture. The Hawaiian estate features rich 
tiling, carefully manicured grounds, and innumerable 
design flourishes all meant to evoke Duke’s own vision of the Islamic world. It also acted as the resting place for much of the heiress’s extensive art collection. The University of Michigan Museum of Art has launched an exhibition featuring examples from this collection along with extensive documentation of the estate and Ms. Duke’s international travels. These photographs, films, art objects, and correspondences will be joined by work from eight contemporary artists of Islamic background.