Posts tagged with "Aldo Cibic":

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AN 2015 Holiday Gift Guide: 16 design-heavy gifts sure to please everyone on your list

The holidays are quickly approaching, and AN has found the best architecture and design gifts to give (or receive) this season. Here are 16 must-have gifts for everyone on your list. The High Line Phaidon Get the inside scoop behind the inspiration and creation of New York’s notable elevated park, The High Line. This hefty tome includes 50 gatefolds and 570 illustrations. $75 Framed Benhaddou Laser Cut Paper Art Molly M Designs Dress up any office or home with this 16- by-16-inch, 3-D paper art masterpiece made of stacked laser-cut paper and framed with poplar wood. $182 Structo Table Curio Design Equipped with Bluetooth technology and both task and ambient light features, this table lamp will bring a pop of color to any office environment. $250 Mod Tablet 2  This Is Ground A handy carryall case for tablets helps you keep your tablet, phone, pens, stylus, glasses, cards, cash, notebooks, small items, open compartments, and cords organized during travel. It’s available in five colorways and also serves as a soft tablet stand. $299 Arbesser Blankets Hem These warm and snuggly throw blankets come in two patterns: Arch and Stripe. Arch is made of New Zealand wool, and Stripe is comprised of 100 percent New Zealand lambswool. Both come in four unique colorways. $120-$150 Measure Up Pendant Set Whitebeam Studio This matte and polished stainless-steel necklace features calipers, a ruler, and L square charms. $113 Courtesy TOM DIXON Brew Cafetiere and Espresso Cups Tom Dixon Coffee enthusiasts will enjoy the copper-finished, stainless-steel cafetiere and espresso cup set—the latest additionsto Tom Dixon’s Brew line of coffee products. Espresso Cups: $130; Cafetiere: $185 Camera Shoulder Bag WELCOMEPROJECTS Accessorize any outfit with this trendy twin-lens camera bag. Measuring four-and-a half inches long, four inches wide, and eight inches tall, this bag is suitable for all seasons. $760 Condiment Architecture Aldo Cibic Perfect for a table centerpiece, this nine-piece condiment set is made of bone china and features salt and pepper shakers, a vase, a toothpick holder, three ramekins, a pitcher, and a tray. $80 An Igloo On The Moon  Circa Press Let your young architect explore the many wonders of building with this historic and informative read by David Jenkins. $30 Plank Scarf Sam Jacob Studio Beat the cold this winter with this warm, twotoned scarf. Wood planks inspired the pattern and the yarn fringes mimic wood splinters. $38 Grid x Line Still Room The design of this foil-stamped stationary set includes a one-inch grid and two line weights. Grid x Line is available in six eye-catching foil colors and two paper types. $5.50-$9 Park Plate Collection notNeutral The National Mall in Washington, D.C., makes it table-side debut in this collection of plates, which includes images of Lincoln Memorial, Tidal Basin, Museum Core, and Capitol Hill. Individual: $50; Set: $180 White Brass Jewelry Collection Marmol Radziner Designed by Marmol Radziner Chief Jewelry Designer Robin Cottle, this fashion-forward jewelry line includes lightweight rings, three wrist cuffs, and earrings. $125 and up Ceramic Bowls and Glasses  Vipp Vipp has joined forces with Danish ceramicist Annemette Kissow to create a seven-piece, handcrafted collection consisting of a bowl, milk jug, egg ring, plate, espresso cup, coffee and teacup, and glasses. $35-$49 Livescribe Notebook Moleskine Moleskine partnered with Livescribe to create a high-tech notebook that turns handwritten notes into digital documents. The notebook works with Livescribe smartpens and the Livescribe+ app. $30
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Venice 2010> Storming the Arsenale & Rem in da Haas

Nothing much to report from yesterday, as it was a day of formal openings when very little was in fact open to the press or public. It was mostly a day of introductory speeches by biennale directors and city and government officials. Frank Gehry presented some models, made a few brief remarks, and then everyone headed for the hallway, where we had our first free prosecco and great little appetizers. Journalists and media types stood around asking about where the best parties were to be had in the coming days (more on this later). Today—after two days of too many speeches and press conferences—the biennale finally opened the doors of both the Arsenale and the national pavilions in the giardini, and everyone had their first chance to officially see if people really do meet in architecture. I ran through the projects installed in the Arsenale and in the afternoon the Italian pavilion in the giardini, which is of course not the Italian pavilion but simply a large exhibition space. The gigantic Arsenale has only 15 installations this year, giving each vast amounts of space in which to confront visitors. Most are therefore huge installations and are really engaged in design pyrotechnics more than displays of building models. They are architecture, but in what is fast becoming a kind of biennale style, halfway between design and art. These include a 3-D film by Wim Wenders of SANAA’s Rolex Center and a smoke-filled cloud room with a long spiral ramp that is a pale replica of Diller and Scofidio’s Blur Building from 2002. Another space titled Architecture as Air: Study for Chateau La Coste by the architect Junya Ishigami is constructed from a field of thin monofilament pieces precisely arrayed across the space like a barely visible Fred Sandback string sculpture. Ishigami’s piece is indecipherable and most visitors simply pass through, but I was told by some young workers that it was meant to be a self-supporting line house until a cat ran through last night and it came crashing down. Can this be true? Anyway, it’s a good story. Like what happened yesterday to Aaron Betsky, who curated the biennale in 2008. He was turned back at the door because he did not have the right credentials. When he protested that he had been the curator two years ago, an official replied: “So what are you doing at the biennale this year?” In the afternoon, I saw the Italian pavilion, which Italian curator Luca Molinari has filled with a more diverse body of work than displayed in the Arsenale, ranging from installation projects to artworks and models. It’s hard in a quick blog post to summarize the work in this enormous pavilion without flattening out the diversity here or reverting to clichés. It deserves more thought and attention and individual consideration and that’s what I will try and do in an upcoming post. But if there is a theme in the Italian pavilion, it is that more than a few critique or try to update the notion of utopia either in its early idealization—or the more recent consideration of it as not a model worth considering. There is Tom Sachs' installation of slightly torn paper Corbusian prototypes on the one side, and Aldo Cibic’s wonderful small-scale utopian landscape of idealized building types, from high-design, high-density housing to bland suburban cul de sacs. In between these are all sorts of architectural thoughts, but none more thoughtful than Rem Koolhaas and a history of his Office for Metropolitan Architecture, a tribute to his winning this year’s Golden Lion. I did have a chance to check out the British pavilion and see its wonderful muf-designed wooden "medical school" theater and miniature Venetian estuary complete with crabs and snails. Both show the advantage of having designers of muf’s ability curating an exhibition. Finally, the Ryue Nishizawa-curated Japanese pavilion is also rethinking utopia, in this case a celebration of the 50th anniversary of the Metabolist movement. It brings back the movement but argues in fact that the city is organic and, as Aaron Levy claims, “beyond politics.” Now for the important stuff: The best party so far was the Audi Urban Futures event at the fabulous and long-vacant Misericordia space, which a Venetian friend used as a basketball court when she was a child. The highlight of the party was the announcement that the Future Award (worth 100,000 euros) was won by Jurgen Mayer H., an architect of great design talent who is now beginning to emerge as an international force. With the biennale finally underway, I’m beginning to wonder if Sejima is right, and people meet in architecture, or, as Italian critic Luigi Prestinenza Pugliese says, does this show prove that “architects don’t really like people?”