Posts tagged with "airport":

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Asthetíque pilots its latest cafe design toward Russia

Imagine a bustling airport terminal: something straight out of a PanAm advertisement but somehow, also in Russia. Setting the stage of this amalgamated image is a monolithic cement wall that mimics the jagged curves of a Soviet-era building. Whispy airplane motifs appear to take flight but are anchored in place by a number of Brutalist details. The interior design of this Moscow cafe is both figuratively and literally influenced by the nearby Khodynka Airfield. As the story goes, the restaurant is located near the Khodynka airfield which saw the first Russian flight in 1910 and remained active till the early 2000s. Asthetíque cofounder Alina Pimkina watched the site transform from a functional airfield into an abandoned tarmaC AND to what is now known as the Leningradsky Redevelopment Project (which includes a soon-to-be space and air museum). For the nearby haunt, Pimkina and partner Julien Albertini envisioned a space that could be both nostalgic and charming with hints of a Wes Anderson stage set.  Cafe Polet's mise en scene combines masculine and feminine characteristics. Plush upholstery lines curvaceous booths and whimsical moon-shaped chairbacks while panels of brass bend and curve around partitions walls. With a delicate balance of light and heavy material, the eatery is organized into three major areas: a diner, cafe, and private dining rooms. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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Zaha Hadid Architects and COX Architecture unveil Australia's future largest airport

Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) and COX Architecture are slated to officially design a new airport in Western Sydney, Australia. After winning an international design competition featuring 40 firms, the London-based practice and local Sydney studio will together lead the charge in creating a sustainable transportation hub for the burgeoning region surrounding Parkland City. Known officially as the Western Sydney International (Nancy-Bird Walton) Airport (WSA), the $5.3 billion project is expected to become a catalyst for growth in Western Parkland City, one of the capitol’s new three urban centers (Greater Sydney is officially broken up into three cities). It will be built out in four expansion stages, the first of which will be completed by 2026 and will serve 10 million passengers annually.  According to the design team, the vision for the upcoming terminal takes cues from the lush Australian bush: WSA will be a low-lying greenfield airport with nature-filled interiors. Vertical gardens featuring local flora will line the walls, slatted timber ceilings will undulate overhead, and ample daylight will spill in from outside during the day. David Holm, project director at COX, and Cristiano Ceccato of ZHA explained the 4,398-acre site will have an “unmistakable regional identity.” “The design is an evolution of Australian architecture past, present, and future,” said Ceccato in a press release. “It draws inspiration from both traditional architectural features such as the veranda, as well as the natural beauty of the surrounding bushland.”  ZHA/COX beat out five other shortlisted teams in the competition for the airport bid. Among them were Foster + Partners, Gensler, Hassell, Pascall+Watson, and Woods Bagot. According to The Sydney Morning Herald, it wasn’t just the highly-localized design that won over the jury, it was the way ZHA/COX presented the importance of the customer’s experience as they journey through the terminal. As the airport expands using modular-based construction, it’s expected that the facility will be able to accommodate up to 82 million passengers a year by 2060—outpacing every other airport in Australia.  These numbers coincide with the increased population of Sydney’s greater metropolis as well. In the next 20 years, it’s estimated that Greater Sydney will likely become home to 9 million people. By the time all of the sections of the airport are complete, Parkland City itself will boast well over 1.5 million, according to the Greater Sydney Commission.  Construction is slated to begin in 2022. 
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55 construction deaths confirmed at the $12 billion Istanbul Airport

Architects’ Journal and Construction News have collaborated on an investigation into the construction safety issues at Turkey’s new $12 billion Istanbul Airport, a project that resulted in an official death toll of 55 over its four-year build-out. While it’s recently come to light that there were substantial human rights violations happening on-site, this new report contributes further evidence that’s even difficult to read. It details the individual stories of several migrant workers who witnessed these deaths firsthand, as well as insight into the horrible living and working conditions there. Considered the largest airport in the world at 818 million square feet (25 percent larger than Manhattan), the Istanbul Airport has been lauded as one of the greatest engineering feats of the last two decades. It was developed by a joint venture group called iGA, which includes several large Turkish contractors and other international companies. The airport’s design has also won numerous awards thanks to a large-scale design effort by three British firms: Grimshaw, Scott Brownrigg, and Haptic Architects, as well as Oslo-based practice Nordic, and two Turkish firms Fonksiyon and TAM/Kiklop.  Phase one of the project opened in April with three runways and 15 million square feet of terminal space. The remaining three phases are expected to be completed by 2025 and together will accommodate up to 200 million passengers annually.  Though the Istanbul Airport boasts these extreme numbers, the human cost of building the mega-structure can never outweigh its prominence on the world’s stage, according to those interviewed by AJ and Construction News. The report describes two horrific deaths, as well as primary accounts of the bed bug-ridden workers’ accommodations, the lack of running water on site, and the mistreatment of laborers by construction management. Some were silenced for simply asking about the number of screws needed for a roof panel.  After protests broke out in September of last year where Turkish police used violence against the workers, the situation drew international attention and received criticism from Human Rights Watch. With more eyes on the scene, it was confirmed this January that 55 people had died during construction, though AJ has found that the actual number could be as high as 400 or more.  Over the last few months, the architecture firms involved with the airport have continued to promote the project despite rumors of the workers’ conditions. Posts have gone up on social media, design work has been exhibited, and the projects have been entered for further awards. AJ questioned whether this was ethically appropriate given the deaths on-site, posing the question, “What do the workers who endured life in ‘the cemetery’–as the project was nicknamed–think of the involvement of the international architects?” Eyal Weizman, founder of Forensic Architecture, told AJ the profession has a major problem in its constant push for publicity and larger-scale megaprojects. Global contemporary architecture, he said, exists in a disturbing “pharaonic dimension.”  “These projects are made mainly for the affluent sections of society and are built by a poorer migrant workforce under grueling conditions and schedules,” said Weizman. “A building like this should be a monument or a memorial. It should be dedicated to the casualties that its architecture and its delivery demanded.”
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Will Francisco González-Pulido design Mexico City's new airport?

Francisco González-Pulido of the Chicago-based FGP Atelier could be the mystery architect behind the design of Mexico City’s new, long-awaited airport. As AN previously reported, a cost-saving replacement to Foster + Partners’ $13 billion vision broke ground in June at the Santa Lucía Air Force Base located 29 miles outside the city center. No architect was named at the time and since then, construction hasn’t actually started. In fact, it’s been suspended on numerous occasions by a local judge until just yesterday when the green light was given to start work.  Despite the stall, news has broken that González-Pulido was invited by the federal government without bidding to collaborate on the airport project given his extensive background designing terminals in Bangkok, Chicago, and Munich. An investigation by national publication Mexicans Against Corruption and Impunity (MCCI) discovered that the Mexican-American architect was involved, but could only confirm that he was an advisor, not specifically the architect of record. González-Pulido only suggested that his design for the airbase would be “energetic, functional, an emblem with which Mexicans identify, very technological and sustainable.”  When Norman Foster’s design for NAICM (Nuevo Aeropuerto Internacional de la Ciudad de México) in Texcoco was canceled last fall, Mexico’s new president Andres Manual Lopez Obrador handed the project over to the Ministry of Defense (Sedena), who selected the Santa Lucía as the site for a $3.8 billion Felipe Ángeles Airport. The largely-rural area, some have said, could become an airport city. But the new terminal wouldn’t be centered around commercial air travel like the former plans in Texcoco. Instead, it might be used to receive flights from low-cost airlines and freights from cargo companies.  Other national news outlets have reported that González-Pulido, who participated in the original NACIM competition in 2014—then as president of Helmut Jahn’s firm, will create the final design for the Felipe Ángeles Airport. But so far, no renderings have been revealed. According to MCCI, plans submitted for the environmental permits seemed to have been done by engineer José Mariá Riobóo, a former campaign adviser to the president.  AN has reached out to Francisco González-Pulido for comment and will update this article accordingly.