Posts tagged with "Airplanes":

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In Dayton, Ohio, a struggle to save the Wright brothers’ aviation factory

In the birthplace of aviation, local preservationists and one famous historian are trying to get an airplane museum concept off the ground. The nonprofit National Aviation Heritage Alliance (NAHA), a National Park Service–affiliated nonprofit, manages an eight-county, aviation heritage area centered around the City of Dayton, Ohio. The area's attractions celebrate the legacy of the Wright brothers, the pioneering fliers of one of the first working planes. Now, the group is pushing to turn Orville and Wilbur Wright's Dayton factory into a museum. In a video, below, Pulitzer Prize–winning historian and author David McCullough puts out the call to save the factory, where that famous plane was assembled.
The $4 million initiative seeks to preserve and transform the 54-acre area for airplane production, now abandoned, into a historical site where visitors can see how aircraft were built in the early 20th century. NAHA plans to acquire the property before the year's end: So far, the group has raised around $2 million, the Dayton Daily News reports, with the city putting down $500,000 and the state, double that. Like nearly every Rust Belt city, Dayton was hit hard by deindustrialization and harder still by the 2008 recession. With major employers like National Cash Register (NCR), the Mead Paper Company, and General Motors downsizing or gone altogether, the city's population has declined by 100,000 since the 1960s. Yet city leaders believe that aviation tourism, bolstered by strong transportation links to Indianapolis, Columbus, and Cincinnati, will draw visitors to Dayton to learn about airplanes and you know, spend some money, although the economic impact of heritage tourism is unclear. For more details, see the National Aviation Heritage Alliance's website here.
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Zaha Hadid to design mathematics wing at London’s Science Museum

In an effort to make math appear exciting, London's Science Museum has tapped Zaha Hadid to design its new mathematics gallery. According to the museum, the new multi-million dollar, Hadid-ian space will "tell stories that place mathematics at the heart of our lives, exploring how mathematicians, their tools and ideas have helped to shape the world from the turn of the 17th century to the present." If that doesn't sound absolutely riveting to you, well maybe some math-themed architecture can help. Good news, that is exactly what Hadid has planned for the space. In a statement, she said, “the design explores the many influences of mathematics in our everyday lives; transforming seemingly abstract mathematical concepts into an exciting interactive experience for visitors of all ages." The centerpiece of Hadid's design is a 1920s-era Handley Page airplane that is surrounded by undulating forms that appear like visualized turbulence. "The gallery's design will bring this remarkable story of the Handley Page bi-plane to life by considering the entire gallery as a wind tunnel for the aircraft," explained the architect. The gallery is expected to open in 2016. [h/t bdonline]
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A Spinning Piper Seneca Lands in Central Park

It's a bird! It's a plane! No, it's actually a plane. On the corner of 60th Street and 5th Avenue in Manhattan, a six-seat, twin-engine Piper Seneca aircraft balances on two vertical steel posts positioned at the end of its wings, playfully rotating on its own axis and likely confusing visitors to Central Park. After doing a double take on the surreal scene, find a plaque located nearby and you'll learn that this mysterious aircraft is actually an installation by artist Paola Pivi, whose portfolio includes scenes of zebras on snowy mountaintops and arenas of screaming people. Working with the Public Art Fund, an organization dedicated to present artists’ work throughout New York City, Paola Pivi opened her newest installation featuring the Piper Seneca, How I Roll last Wednesday, June 20th. Like much of Paola Pivi's work, How I Roll challenges the onlookers to broaden their imagination and perceive something that's usually inconceivable in reality. Frozen in a continuous loop-the-loop at ground level, the aircraft dismisses its own identity as a flying machine, floating and spinning effortlessly on the edge of the park. By ignoring its own gargantuan weight and the context of flying high in the sky, plane becomes an object, a sculpture, perhaps finally linking industrial design and sculpture. Just take a look at it spinning in the video above, or, even better, get your own in-person dose of surrealism by visiting Pivi's How I Roll any time day or night through August 26th.
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Quick Clicks> Airjet Printers, Candid Camera, Yoga & Architecture, Tracing Labyrinths

It’s a printed airplane! The printed aircraft has arrived. Researchers in the UK created the first 3D-printed electric-powered airplane. Core77 explained that 3D printing was originally developed for the US Navy (to eliminate excess parts) making repairing damage easier. Red light, green light. For Mayor Bloomberg, safety is paramount. He even believes there should be red light cameras at every New York City intersection. At a recent conference, he cited economic reasons: the city cannot afford to have cops on every corner. Check out the Mayor’s comments at Transportation Nation. Bharadvaja's Twist. A hybrid architecture firm and yoda studio called Arte New York is... stretching... their space in the garment district, adding an additional 15,000 square feet according to Crain’s. The firm's new space will include a wellness center for the community. The labyrinth. Beginning September 12th, the Centre Pompidou-Metz in France will present Wander, Labyrinthine Variations, an exhibit exploring the development of labyrinths through a variety of mediums including architecture, art, film, maps, as well as archeological findings. More at e-flux.
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Revealing The Airplane Of The Future

Aircraft manufacturer Airbus unveiled its conceptual designs for a futuristic, see-through plane last week in advance of the 2011 Paris Airshow, which began today. The "Concept Cabin" showcases what commercial air travel could look like in 2050, and is packed with interfacing technologies and design features to give passengers an ultra-personalized and otherworldly experience. The cabin of the theoretical plane would be coated with an intelligent bipolymer wall membrane—supported via a lightweight bionic structure based on the bone structures of birds—  that could become transparent, providing passengers with panoramic views of the sky. It would be divided into three sections: a spa-like "vitalizing zone" for relaxation; an "interactive zone" with pop-up gaming projections; and a luxury business lounge or "smart tech zone" to stay connected. Other amenities would include self-cleaning materials, seats that morph to individual body shapes, hologram displays and gesture recognition controls. And look at all that leg room! To develop their design concepts, Airbus surveyed over 10,000 people to ask what they want from the aviation industry in the future. While still just “engineers’ dreams,” according to Charles Champion, Head of Engineering at Airbus, the concepts “offer a glimpse of some of the very real possibilities that existing technology and talent can offer—with the right investment, support and co-operation". For more information visit here.
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747 House Sneak Peek

David Hertz's 747 House in Malibu— literally made from the wings and fuselage of a a retired 747— is not quite done (it's residents are moving in now). But we've been able to get a few pictures of the house from photographer Sara Jane Boyers, who has been documenting the project since June 2008. Hertz obtained the 747 for $50,000, and has used every bit of it in the construction of the main residence and six ancillary structures (note the wing roofs and the engine fountain, for starters). Besides the obvious green-ness of being recycled from an airplane, the house also uses Solar power, radiant heating and natural ventilation. Enjoy these pix and stay tuned for more as the house finishes up. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow.