Posts tagged with "AIA Dallas":

Placeholder Alt Text

AIA Dallas announces winners of its 2020 Unbuilt Design Awards

Last night in a virtual celebration, the AIA Dallas announced the winners of its 2020 Unbuilt Design Awards. A jury made of Inanc Eray, founding partner of Eray/Carbajo; Jen Maigret, founding principal at PLY+ and an associate professor of architecture at the University of Michigan, and Jesús Robles, founding principal of D U S T and an instructor at the University of Arizona, selected projects from Gensler, Dallas-based designer Eric Gonzalez, and Dallas-based firm Agent Architecture as the night’s winners out of a pool of 42 entries. Dallas-headquartered firm 5G Studio also won a people’s choice award.  The winners showcased a variety of styles and approaches but shared a sensitivity to context and regional landscapes.  The Dallas: Freeways Hacked proposal from Agent Architecture cheekily advertises a future Dallas where the highways ringing the city have been converted into a linear park system featuring elevated habitats for wildlife, recreational waterways, a hippodrome for drone racing (“the premier hygienic sport,” said the designers), and a venue for contactless outdoor dining. The proposal was the only winner to explicitly address life in the age of COVID-19, though it was not the only one to sensitively engage with public outdoor space and think about its site on a regional scale. Gensler’s Frisco Public Library proposal, an adaptive reuse of an industrial “tilt-wall structure [that] was once used to manufacture rocket ships,” according to the firm, was inspired by the surrounding Blackland Prairie’s Dogtrot-style homes, which feature a breezeway through a small cabin. Gensler’s design would add a new volume to an existing Frisco, Texas, building and would add entrances where the new and old masses meet, just as Dogtrot homes feature entrances on either side of their breezeways. The project’s site plan also includes extensive landscaping meant to recreate a slice of the almost completely destroyed local prairie ecosystem. The Converse Guest House by Eric Gonzales, which previously won the Iceland Thermal Springs Guest House competition, envisioned two sensitively sited cabins for a resort in Northern Iceland. In the design, two single-story, wood-clad buildings with nine-square grid plans sit askew from one another while long boardwalks approach them through the rugged Nordic landscape. 5G Studio’s Batu Hotel, the people’s choice award winner, envisioned a 28-story tower in the Indonesian countryside, and the jury conjectured that the proposal’s dreamy imagery of foggy mountain views and moody spalike interiors won over the voting public. In a discussion after the awards announcements, jurors emphasized the importance of exploring bold ideas in design, especially in the era of COVID-19 and acute climate change, and celebrated the role of the Unbuilt Awards in highlighting ideas that push the boundaries of the profession and guide the world toward a better future.
Placeholder Alt Text

Dallas AIA chapter announces 2016 Built Design Awards

Out of 46 submissions, the Dallas Chapter of the American Institute of Architects has selected four projects to receive its 2016 Built Design Awards. This year’s recipients were selected by a jury composed of internationally renowned architects Matthew Kreilich, AIA, design principal and partner at Snow KreilichArchitects in Minneapolis; David Lewis, AIA, a founding principal at LTL Architects in New York; and Sebastian Schmaling, AIA, founding principal at Johnsen Schmaling Architects in Milwaukee. The final award recipients were selected based on each project’s unique response to its cultural, social, environmental, programmatic, and contextual challenges. “The 46 entries submitted for Design Awards this year were commended for their quality and representation by the jury,” said Michael Friebele, associate AIA, 2016 AIA Design Awards chair and senior associate at FTA Design Studio. “The six awarded projects were recognized as not only the best in design, but also for their unique range of program and context, a direct reflection of the expertise behind our jury this year. We are pleased to honor and celebrate the recipients and their contribution to the elevation of design in our community.” The jury also recognized two additional projects with citation awards.

1. Fire Station No. 27, Perkins+Will (Dallas)

Fire Station 27 was designed to re-establish a proper civic presence and foster a strong connection to the surrounding community that is often lacking in this building type. Responding to a compact site, Fire Station 27 was the City of Dallas’s first multistory station in over one hundred years. It consists of 23,600 square feet with two levels above grade and one level of parking below grade with capacity for 15 personnel per shift.

Jurors commended the project’s success as an urban infill building, as well as its strong organizing concept and celebratory story wall.

2. Prospect House, Max Levy Architect (Dripping Springs)

At this rural wedding and event center, celebrations are accommodated inside, outside, and on a big screened-in breezeway. Above the main hall is a huge wind vane whose mast extends down into the room and supports a 12-foot-diameter ring that turns with the breezes, connecting festivities inside with the world outside.

Jurors celebrated the thoughtful, restrained design, its elemental quality, and the overall modesty and simplicity of the project.

3. Hilti North America Headquarters, Gensler (Plano)

In the new Hilti North America Headquarters, the client’s top priority was celebrating the culmination of Hilti’s people and products. Not only was the entire office built exclusively with Hilti construction tools, over 26,000 modified Hilti products were woven into the architecture of the space—all intended to generate and showcase a pride in the product and the people who design, create, and market it.

Jurors praised the project’s clear concept, clean detailing, and the creation of shared spaces that foster interaction and collaboration.

4. Houndstooth Coffee and Jettison Cocktail Bar, OFFICIAL (Dallas)

The design for Houndstooth Coffee and Jettison Cocktail Bar was driven by the building’s dual function as a bar and a coffee shop and their shared connection. The design centers on an elemental concept of day to night, with Houndstooth filling the larger, sunlit space, and Jettison occupying the intimate back corner. High ceilings create openness in the coffee shop and a “floating” wood-clad volume, referred to as the cloud, serves as the central focal point, drawing the eye up while balancing the space and concealing the mechanical system. Jettison Cocktail Bar takes the inverse of the cloud design with a lowered ceiling and a central void looking into the painted gold trusses that have the character of a chandelier.

Jurors appreciated the elegant yet playful interiors, the creative use of light, and the duality of the distinct spaces.

Projects receiving Juror Citations are:

5. House at Rainbo Lake, Max Levy Architect (Henderson County)

Located in a swampy forest along a lake, this weekend retreat houses an extended family of sportsmen and nature enthusiasts. Each room is a separate building, and a screened in porch connects each building. Color is instrumental to this design, and coloration of exterior materials merges with the site.

6. Twin Gables, FAR + DANG (Dallas)

Set within a transitioning East Dallas neighborhood, this project bridges the traditional forms of the existing surrounding homes with a modern, high-density prototype. These duplex units embrace the length of the property and are designed around visual connections to a series of carefully composed outdoor spaces.

Placeholder Alt Text

AIA Dallas selects four winners for 2016 Unbuilt Design Awards

Of 40 submissions from 14 Dallas firms, the Dallas Chapter of the American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected four designs to receive its 2016 AIA Dallas Unbuilt Design Awards. This year’s recipients were selected by a jury composed of world-renowned architects, including Jacob Brillhart, founder of Brillhart Architecture; Mary-Ann Ray, a principal of Studio Works Architects and cofounder and co-director of the experimental laboratory for urban and rural research and design at BASE Beijing; and Adam Marcus, AIA, director for Variable Projects and partner in Futures North.

Dallas Arboretum Perkins + Will

The Garden Education Center at the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Gardens acts as a gateway for visitors—an experience that is equal parts display, science, and education outreach. Inspired by the concept of “cycles” the arboretum is a figure-eight loop form. The design burrows into the ground and then curves up into the air with the loop offering 360 degree views of the garden. The jurors praised the way the project creates an experiential procession into the park.

Jiefangbei Tower CallisonRTKL

Set within densely populated Chongqing, China, the project creates a city within a city, rendering the tower as a contributing part of the urban fabric both in plan and volume. Articulation of form and spatial experience speaks to the characteristic mist that envelops Chongqing down to the flow of the pedestrian life at street level. Spaces cascade throughout the project to form volumetric interaction and connect to the city at every level. The jurors commended the project’s ability to weave public space into a building experience that is generally only reserved for a few.

Hillen Residence NIMMO

The Hillen Residence connects the homeowners to their surroundings by weaving into the landscape and then graciously opening toward expansive views of native Texan flora. A site-specific project, the form, both in plan and volume, is driven by natural connections stitched together with facets of the family’s daily life. The jurors appreciated the project’s ability to manifest a complex plan and idea into a simple gesture that allows the homeowner to experience the architecture and local environment from every vantage point.

Oak Cliff Brewing Company Munn Harris Architects

With a reclaimed industrial warehouse and minimal budget—a result of high equipment cost—the proposal for Oak Cliff Brewing Company aims to create a welcoming place for the public through minimal design costs. Using a large pecan tree on-site as inspiration, reclaimed wood elements act as a unifying palette and define the character of both indoor and outdoor spaces. The jurors were impressed by the modest proposal and its ability to do a lot with a little.

Fed Scraper – Juror Citation HKS, Inc.

The FED Scraper proposes a physical constraint to the U.S. Government’s ever-expanding spatial capacity. The proposal sinks the federal government building into a sub-grade metropolis where the terrain creates a physical limitation on growth. In turn, the ground place is activated for public programming, thus giving back large swaths of D.C. to the people. The jurors praised the project’s utopian ambition and visionary scale, as well as the use of humor and irony as a means of pushing the outcome outside of the comfort zone.