Posts tagged with "Zaha Hadid":

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Rare sketches and artwork from Zaha Hadid to go on display at the Serpentine Gallery in London

At the Serpentine Gallery in London, an exhibition starting this December will showcase a range of notebook drawings and other early artwork by the late Zaha Hadid. The esteemed British-Iraqi architect passed away earlier this year in March, however, the retrospective exhibition was planned before this. The gallery's artistic director, Hans Ulrich Obrist, got the idea to present Hadid's work when he attended her ceremonial RIBA lecture after her award of the Royal Gold Medal for Architecture (Hadid was also the first woman to claim the prize). During her speech, Hadid showed unseen notebooks that contained sketches that reflected her approach to architectural form-finding. “I was completely transfixed,” said Obrist, speaking in The Guardian. “I had never seen such notebooks. I wanted to see her to discuss what we could do. An exhibition? A book?” After Obrist's and Hadid's subsequent meeting on the matter, Hadid travelled to Miami where, after undergoing treatment for bronchitis, she died unexpectedly. “We had planned that after her return, her office would get all the drawings out and we would start the work,” continued Obrist. The exhibition will be located in the Serpentine Sackler Gallery. Here, rare paintings done early on in Hadid's career will be displayed. “They are not known enough, they are not known to a wider audience and we want many people to see them beyond the art and architecture world," said Obrist. "She is one of the great visionaries of our time, she is a historic figure and this is also why we feel this work has to be seen now and why it is so urgent. There could not be a more wonderful connection, to show it in her own building, the only structure in central London of hers.” Hadid has a strong relationship with the gallery. Her first work in London was the inaugural Serpentine Pavilion (which went up in 2000) and she has been a trustee since 1996. The exhibition will run through February 12, 2017. For next year's Serpentine Pavilion commission, British architects Richard Rogers and David Adjaye will be part of an advisory panel. The winner will be chosen by Obrist and new CEO Yana Peel.
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Zaha Hadid’s 2007 Serpentine Pavilion is now on show at Chatsworth House in the U.K.

In July 2007, Zaha Hadid came to rescue when plans for that year's Serpentine pavilion faltered. Steel prices were on the rise and the pavilion's realization, designed by Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson and Norwegian architect Kjetil Thorsen, stalled. The Lilas Installation, designed by the late British-Iraqi architect and Patrik Schumacher, stood in its place for nine days at the Serpentine Gallery in London. Nine years on, the Lilas Installation is now on show in gardens of Chatsworth House in Derbyshire, England. The installation is the showpiece of the yearly Beyond Limits sculpture exhibition put on show at Chatsworth by the auction house Sotheby's. The Lilas Installation is currently up for sale (with no price specified). It covers 3,336 square feet and rises 18 feet high—not quite small enough for a suburban back garden. For comparison, Sou Fujimoto's 2013 pavilion was sold for a reported $653,900. Julia Peyton-Jones was the Serpentine director in 2007. “It was one of those little miracles,” she said, remembering the moment. “It was uncomfortable to be in the position of not having a pavilion on time that year—[but] stuff happens and it is how you deal with it that is the major issue. As a result, we had this gorgeous project that was unexpected and it was an absolute little gem… so typical in its simplicity and so relevant to her work.” Once again, Hadid and Schumacher's creation is open to the public. A stately home in the U.K.'s midlands, Chatsworth House is set among the countryside and has an extensive array of public and private gardens. Its history spans back to the 16th century when the original house was built in 1553. In 1568, the house even was used to hold custody of Mary Queen of Scots. Today, visitors can pay just over $20 to tour the gardens and view the Lilas Installation before it is eventually sold. Originally, the work had been planned to be unveiled at Chatsworth before Hadid's passing. “It is very poignant,” said Peyton-Jones. “But all the more marvelous that this masterwork should be presented to remind us what an extraordinary contribution she made.” Simon Stock, senior director at Sotheby's and curator of the show at Chatsworth, spoke of how the 2007 work will fit into its historic setting. "They don’t clash, they complement in a way the pyramid does at the Louvre," he said. "It is a very beguiling structure, it draws you in, it is an extraordinary thing”. “Is it principally sculptural?" Stock questioned, attempting to describe the installation. "Is it a piece of architecture... do you see it was a building, in other words? Do you see it as something organic that has grown out of the ground? It is all of those things combined.” Lilas Installation at the Serpentine Gallery © Zaha Hadid Architects from Zaha Hadid Architects on Vimeo.
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Zaha Hadid–designed bathroom for Porcelanosa would fit right in on the International Space Station

A new collection of bath products, designed by Zaha Hadid, was created for Noken, a line by Porcelanosa that "specializes in bathroom elements, and brings sophisticated design in brassware, sanitary-ware, bathtubs, etc.," according to a press release from the brand. The selection of cosmic vanity, tub, hardware, and combination toilet/bidet contains no harsh edges, and flows from one piece to another. The fluid forms "evoke water...and for this reason it has been named Vitae (“life” in latin), because in water is where all sort of life begins." Spanish-based company Porcelanosa is a leader in kitchen and bath products, as well as tiles and solutions for contemporary architecture. They have grown to include eight separate companies, of which Noken deals in luxury design
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Zaha Hadid, Gensler, and more, vying in Sunset Strip billboard competition

The Sunset Strip, a 1.5 mile stretch of West Hollywood's Sunset Boulevard, has established a reputation for eye-catching billboards. Attempting to magnify this, city authorities issued a formal Request for Proposals (RFP) for "The Sunset Strip Spectacular Pilot Creative Off-Site Advertising Sign" on 8775 Sunset Boulevard. Subsequently, a select number of teams were solicited to "design a technologically advanced, engaging, one-of-a-kind, billboard structure... The Sunset Strip Spectacular should inspire a 21st century vision with contemporary digital and interactive technologies, media and multi-dimensional graphic design." From this, nine applications were submitted and four were selected for further deliberation: JCDecaux and Zaha Hadid Project Management Ltd.; Orange Barrel Media/Tom Wiscombe Architecture/MoCA; Outfront Media/Gensler/MAK Center; and Tait Towers Inc. The proposals feature a range of ideas from kinetic design to viewer engagement through social media platforms and strategy for an adjacent multi-use public square. In Hadid's design, titled The Prism, the billboard becomes a civic gateway operating as a an "innovative, captivating hybrid environment." The sculptural brushed aluminum form, in classic Hadid style, twists elegantly as it rises into the air. Nearby, a public plaza uses shaded seating, drought-tolerant landscaping, and various lighting techniques to create a tranquil environment. Gensler, working alongside Outfront Media, have put forward an "unfolding sunset." Its series of moveable panels create an illusory experience that blends adverts with art, performance, and social media, coalescing into a single image as viewers travel toward and past the billboard. Tom Wiscombe, on the other hand, aims to reinterpret the classical billboard of old. "Our design is a vertically-oriented, three-dimensional media monolith, in contrast to the ubiquitous flat, horizontal billboards of the strip," the design team said in their proposal. Using LED technology, high-resolution systems, and an array of lighting devices, social media content will be displayed while the billboard promotes events and shows art curated by the Museum of Contemporary Art (MoCA). Interestingly, only one quarter of the billboard's surface area will be used to display commercial content. Finally, the most unique design is the aptly named Spectacular by TAIT. It features a rotating billboard that's meant to mimic the bow-ties worn at the Sunset Strip's infamous black-tie clubs of the 1930 and '40s. The billboard is set to display both static and animated content using multimedia commercials.
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One of Hadid’s last designs to be built in Chelsea

One of the last designs from late British-Iraqi architect Zaha Hadid will be realized in New York. Working with developers The Moinian Group, Hadid and her firm Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) were commissioned more than a year ago to provide apartments and space for a "world-class" cultural institution at 220 Eleventh Avenue in West Chelsea, Manhattan.

“We must invest in cultural spaces—they are a vital component of a rich urban life and cityscape, they unite the city and tie the urban fabric together,” said Hadid in 2015.  

Hadid's long-term colleague and Partner at ZHA Patrik Schumacher spoke of the firm's joy to be working in a city that played a big part in Hadid's life. “As the world celebrates Zaha’s remarkable legacy," he said in a press release, "we are delighted to be announcing her unique collaboration with The Moinian Group for New York, a city that greatly influenced her creative work.”

Hadid's design aims to evoke the loft-like residences that are commonplace in the Chelsea. A coterie of penthouse apartments and a cultural institution will also be embedded into the project. At the time of writing, The Moinian Group are in talks with institutions regarding residency at the site.

“We are deeply honored to develop one of Zaha’s final creations and cement her astonishing legacy forevermore here in Manhattan. She was a special woman and a friend who we all miss very much,” said Mitchell Moinian of The Moinian Group.

The Moinian Group's release mentions that Hadid visited New York many times and was able to develop an understanding of the city, its values and architectural heritage. As a result, the Group said, much of Manhattan's vernacular typologies and the area's way of life have formed her design and approach for 220 Eleventh Avenue.

Set to break ground at the start of next year, sales for housing units are currently in line to begin toward the end of 2017. Images of the project have not yet been revealed but you can find images of her other New York project on the High Line here.

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Zaha Hadid’s retrospective in Venice: A kaleidoscopic tribute missing her final touches

The first posthumous retrospective of the grand dame of architecture opened at the Palazzo Franchetti last week to coincide with the opening of the Venice Architecture Biennale. A smaller show was quickly re-shuffled after her passing in March into a retrospective featuring an impressive range of material and media. From hand sketches to virtual reality environments, the variety of media is a testament to Hadid: She began her career in an analogue world and later became a leading figure during a transitional moment in digital design. In that sense, the show doubles as a record of techniques adopted within architecture throughout the past four decades. The retrospective encompasses built, under-construction, in development, and unrealized projects, loosely organized in ten rooms by chronology and media. In addition to models and drawings, video interviews and animation sequences supplement the show. It opens spectacularly with a gradated field of parametric tower studies set in the sumptuous hallway of the Palazzo Franchetti. Both the neo-gothic Venetian palazzo and Zaha's architecture respond to a series of mathematical rules and proportions that can be applied at all scales and work together harmoniously. In fact, Hadid has exhibited multiple times in historic spaces in Italy, often to great effect. Several biennales ago, she designed a series of sculptures for the Villa Malcontenta by Andrea Palladio based on the building's proportions. Special attention is given to early projects pivotal to her career, including her first built project from 1993, the Vitra fire station. Even though computers were already used for drafting at the time, the project is mainly represented through hand sketches, hand-cut foam models, and her legendary large oil paintings. The MAXXI Museum of 21st Century Arts in Rome, completed in 2009, shows an evolution of her aesthetic enabled by increasingly available 3D modeling software. The curvy forms of the museum were drawn using programs such as Rhino or Maya, yet the process still includes paper models and hand sketching. In contrast, the projects of ZHA CODE, a unit within the office dedicated to digital design research established five years ago, tend to generate—rather than sculpt—form through code. Instituted as an experimentation and education platform, ZHA CODE projects often do translate into concrete design proposals. One of their realized projects shown at the retrospective is a 3D printed chair designed through a combination of 3D modeling and structural optimization scripts. This combination of technique, which uses both sculpting and generative scripting, points towards an increasing technical proficiency in creating form based on particular functional variables, rather than purely formal ones. As another example, the minimal surface defining the Mathematics Gallery at the Science Museum in London was generated based on airflow around an airplane displayed in the show. One room at the exhibit is dedicated to the documentation of constructed projects and features photographs by Helene Binet. Strangely the black and white photographs of the built projects are among the most abstract representations of space in the entire exhibition. Seeing four decades of incessant production compressed into such a small space is impressive, yet it also makes the absence of the architect the more palpable. Missing the eye of an architect famous for her consistency and drawing disparate things together, the show is vertiginous in its density and variety. It also produces some strange adjacencies and overlaps. Overlooking the grand canal of Venice, the most recent and in-progress projects are represented through large scale, colorful client renderings filling every available square centimeter, only to be topped by a set of VR glasses and large tables covered with models and publications. Perhaps, precisely because of this hurried, unfiltered display, the show becomes an important snapshot of the work produced by an office still under the immediate direction of Hadid. Given the stature of the work and the strong legacy created by the Iraqi architect, the office might become the first architecture super-brand, not unlike fashion brands continue to thrive for decades under different directors, bearing the founder's name. For now, this retrospective allows to marvel at Zaha Hadid’s immense production while already missing her final touches.
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The Frank Gehry and Zaha Hadid exhibits at the Venice Biennale

The Venice architecture biennale has released a list of 19 official collateral events taking place around the city during the biannual (in even years) event. It’s a fascinating list of projects, installations, national design programs, and it’s diversity shows why this is still the best event in the architecture calendar. But there are also dozens of unofficial events worth checking out. Here are two: Building in Paris by Frank Gehry at the Esapce Louis Vuitton (Calle del Ridotto 1353, 30124 Venezia) and Zaha Hadid at the Palazzo Franchetti on Campo Santo Stefano. The Gehry exhibit claims to “retrace the story of Frank Gehry’s dream through a selection of scale models themed by program, project design, interior spaces, “icebergs,” and glass sails. This exhibit also features an installation by Daniel Buren that incorporates the glass roof of the Esapce Louis Vuitton. The Zaha Hadid exhibit is a retrospective of the late, spectacular architect and was quickly assembled by Patrik Schumacher as a memorial. Both of these are on view through the run of the biennale, November 29th. Building in Paris May 27 – November 26, 2016 Monday – Saturday, 10:00am - 7.30pm, Sunday, 10.30am - 7.30p Espace Louis Vuitton Venezia, Calle del Ridotto 1353, 30124 Venezia #FondationLouisVuitton Zaha Hadid May 27 – November 26, 2016 Monday– Sunday, 10:00am - 6:00pm (10 euro entry fee, group rates available) Palazzo Franchetti
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Cincinnati’s CAC to host a celebration of the life and work of Zaha Hadid

Zaha Hadid’s untimely death has triggered a global conversation surveying her work and status in the history of the discipline. A wealth of former educators, partners, and colleagues has illuminated Zaha’s professional body of work with deeply personal tributes. Their words help to break down her mystique for the rest of us, and perhaps add another dimension to a body of work that spans over three decades. Adding to the conversation is an upcoming event at the Hadid-designed Contemporary Arts Center in Cincinnati. The building is notably her first project in the United States, and has been called the first major museum in the United States to be designed by a female architect. Part panel discussion, part celebration, the event will be, according to CAC Director Raphaela Platow, an “afternoon of storytelling.” The program will survey Zaha’s work to the present, speculate on her firm’s future projects. Beyond this, a discussion of the CAC’s commission and construction promises to share stories of the famed architect’s working process. “Equity in Architecture—Zaha Hadid’s mentorship,” presented by Associate Dean of DAAP Patricia Kucker, will explore Zaha’s influence to architects worldwide as a woman that broke through barriers and challenged perceptions.
Platow said Hadid’s selection to design the CAC was aligned with their mission to celebrate cutting-edge work: “When our committee selected Zaha as the architect of The Rosenthal Center she had only successfully finished one building but her ideas, plans, models, and competition submissions where beyond remarkable; they were back then already showing a future path for architecture.” “Celebrating the Life and Work of Zaha Hadid” will be held at the Contemporary Arts Center on May 7th from 1:00-3:30pm. Free and open to the public. INTRODUCTORY REMARKS: EVENT SPEAKERS:
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Salerno Maritime Terminus by Zaha Hadid Architects opened in Italy

The Salerno Maritime Terminal in south west Italy has been inaugurated by the Italian prime minister Matteo Renzi. The building, which has been in the making for 16 years, is the first to be opened since Zaha Hadid's passing at the end of March earlier this year.

As part of a city-wide regeneration plan initiated in 1993, the terminus won an international competition in 2000. Situated on a public quay that continues into the marina, the building aims to continue "the city’s relationship with the sea and establishes new links; connecting Salerno’s rich maritime traditions with its historic urban fabric and beyond to the hills that frame the city."

Bearing the resemblance of an oyster, an asymmetric shell forms the roof and offers a much needed shaded area during the summer months. Come nightfall, the terminal is illuminated via an accent-lit concrete soffit running around the building's perimeter.

Underneath, administration offices for national border controls and shipping lines, as well as a restaurant and passenger waiting areas, are housed. Interior orientation ensures the swift circulation of passengers through waiting lounges, check-in, passport, security and customs controls to their ship.

As a result, 500,000 extra passengers will be able to pass through the port each year, meaning more ferry and cruise ships could dock. This, Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) argues, "could create up to 2,000 new jobs in the city’s hospitality, services and retail sectors."

Due to its location, the terminal offers views of both sides of the famed Amalfi Coast, the Gulf of Salerno, and Cilento World Heritage Site. ZHA also hopes it "will act as a lighthouse to the port, welcoming visitors to the city."

When opening the terminal, Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi paid tribute to the late Zaha Hadid. “This extraordinary work adds to everything Salerno is doing to transform itself and I think it is marvelous,” Renzi said. “It is also a way of remembering the great architect that Zaha Hadid was.”

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The MoMA’s tribute to Zaha Hadid

The Museum of Modern Art has just put up a small tribute exhibition of the drawings of Zaha Hadid. It foregrounds her powerful image making and evocative and personal drawing style—the most influential of her generation. The tribute includes an exterior painted perspective of her competition entry into the Peak completion (1991) in Kowloon. Next to this painting is a series of 20 colored pencil, graphite, and ink hand drawings for Parc de la Villette, Paris (1982-83). These works—all from the period before her studio turned into an office—showcase working drawings that powerfully point to why she was considered such an important figure in the world of architecture. The exhibition was organized by Sean Anderson and Arièle Dionne-Krosnick of the museum's department of architecture and design.
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Miami Beach backs out of Zaha Hadid–designed parking garage

The City of Miami Beach has scrapped plans for a parking garage and public plaza designed by the late Zaha Hadid. Initiated in 2011, the project was supposed to replace two city-owned parking lots in the Collins Park neighborhood, situated behind the Miami City Ballet and local library. Initial cost estimates for the spiraling, all-white design came in at $50 million, around $23 million overbudget. The city and Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) collaborated on a design that brought costs down to $24 million, but city officials were not pleased with the more minimal garage 2.0: The structure had fewer parking spaces, the plaza was smaller, there was less space for retail, and the spirited signature curves of the original plan were muted or removed. Another version of the design (estimated cost: $29 million) was a good compromise for ZHA's local collaborator, Berenblum Busch Architecture. Gustavo Berenblum, principal, explained to the Miami Herald that the $29 million version retained the project's driving design elements, but that another price cut below that diminished the "essence" of the project. Hadid had a special connection the project: Although she lived mostly in London, she owned a second home near the planned garage. Next steps? The downtown still needs parking, so it's back to the drawing board. City officials will start the process afresh and request proposals for a garage that would also include housing on the upper stories. Perhaps the money saved on the project could go towards something pressing, like saving the city from mortal inundation.
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Peter Cook’s Obituary of Zaha Hadid

THE MEMORY OF ZAHA

Zaha : the Great Light extinguished. From every point of view exceptional : As a direct, original, fearless personality. With a more than adequate supply of charm and humour. Used with more discretion than blandness. IMMENSE talent. Such that it either inspired, bewildered, or caused deep jealousy (that manifest itself in lesser talent to pick away at her motives, reputation or personality)

Thirteen years ago, the other Giant : Cedric Price, died. Different animal, but leaving a similar void. London – and the architecture world – now seems lost : we are now berift of that most precious and mysterious quality : power through inspiration and talent plus bags of personality that rendered both of them as beacons of hope for architecture. ‘Sticking to one’s guns’ is an amazing gift. Zaha told it as it is : she had the priority of a clear, powerful and ever-poetic architecture. Many tried to copy it but lacked her deftness of line. And the line was MORE than a line : it so easily and frequently resulted in a spatial exploration of extraordinary newness : the wonder of the interior of the Alyev Centre in Baku remains in one’s mind as a dream. The sharp, clean, razor-like dart of the Vitra Fire Station has the purity of an ‘early period’ Zaha building – but you’re actually inside it, living the dream of the drawing. From the first years when this conspicuously talented recent student became the lively attachment to Rem Koolhaas and Elia Zenghelis’ young OMA setup, you were aware of a strength of talent bursting out. Her trajectory and example stands there beckoning the many women (now maybe a majority) who work in architecture : if she can do it, they can do it . Let’s hope one or two of them out there can blend talent with personality – the latter gift being a necessary factor in order to sustain the pressure in this, most contrary, profession. A loyal friend who could also be a good laugh. Peter Cook 4.1.16 Editor's note: This piece will also appear in The Architectural Review.