Posts tagged with "Zaha Hadid Architects":

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Zaha Hadid Architects designs pop-up pavilion for Il Makiage

Makeup brand Il Makiage has opened up a new Soho pavilion designed by Zaha Hadid Architects to coincide with the launch of their new 800-product collection. The pavilion’s angular tunnel of ribbons with alternating gloss and matte finishes mimics the makeup’s packaging in exploded form. Each of the ribbons is slightly different and lighting is installed in them and around the mirrors, helping shoppers accurately choose the right color and tone. Kar-Hwa Ho, head of interiors at Zaha Hadid Architects, said that they “wanted to create an environment defined by the woman celebrated by Il Makiage,” adding that the pavilion is intended to be a “personal space that’s all about her.” The mobile pavilion will be open in Soho for six months and a second New York City pavilion will be opening in Flatiron this summer. Zaha Hadid Architects is also developing the permanent Il Makiage New York boutique, as well as locations in D.C. and Miami.
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Zaha Hadid Architects paid women employees about 20 percent less in 2017

Following a 2017 change to U.K. law that required firms with 250 or more employees to report their gender pay gaps, Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) has released data showing their female employees were paid 20.86 percent less on average in 2017. The firm’s pay gap reflect a general trend across the industry, although some firms have an average pay gap as low as ten percent, according to the Architect’s Journal. Through an in-house report produced by ZHA (available here), the firm compared the median incomes earned by both men and women–the middle-most figure–to calculate the pay disparity. Men were paid 20.86 percent more on average and received bonuses 64.94 larger on average, while only 75.6 percent of women received a bonus in 2017 versus 84.05 percent of men at the studio. Across the firm’s 310 U.K. employees, 37 percent are women. ZHA has chalked this imbalance up to the higher percentage of men in leadership positions, who have been with the firm the longest and command bonuses that are tied to the company’s revenue. According to the report:
“This pay gap exists because [a] higher proportion of our longest-serving team members who grew the practice with Zaha Hadid over the past 30 years are male and have continued to lead the company since her passing in 2016. We therefore currently have a smaller proportion of women than men in higher paid senior positions.”
In an effort to address these imbalances, ZHA has increased the company’s maternity pay and partnered with the Architect’s Journal’s Women in Architecture forum. A mentorship program has also been established throughout the firm. Still, even as firms are motivated by public exposure to address the imbalances in pay between men and women, studies have shown that the pay gap is widening. Foster + Partners, AECOM, and other big names have disclosed similar figures, though they claim that the imbalance also results from having more men at the top and not as an equal pay issue. Foster + Partners has, for their part, also committed to broadening gender diversity at the senior level, while AECOM pledged to create a more inclusive workforce. Transparency in the field has become a pressing topic as of late, as more and more women have been coming forward with their experiences regarding harassment, discrimination, and general misconduct. A full list of U.K. companies who have disclosed their pay and bonus gap data is available here. Companies have until April 4 to disclose their pay gap report, and more industry figures will be forthcoming.
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Zaha Hadid Architects faces criticism over newly revealed London skyscrapers

Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) is facing community backlash over recently unveiled plans to bring a double-pronged, mixed-use tower to Vauxhall, South London. As reported by the Architect’s Journal, the building was submitted for local council approval in December, but has caught the public’s ire over the 53-story and 42-story towers that would rise right on the bank of the River Thames. Linked by an 11-story base, the Vauxhall scheme would hold 257 apartments and 618 hotel rooms across the two towers, as well as seven floors of office space in the base and retail at the ground level. Both the towers and the base will feature a glass curtain wall overlain with a unifying exoskeleton-like façade that stretches and decompresses as the building rises, exposing uninterrupted glass near the top. It would also become the tallest building in the emerging Vauxhall area, with the taller tower potentially topping out at about 607 feet. It would be ZHA’s first major mixed-use residential building in the United Kingdom, and the studio sees it as a “breakthrough project,” according to the Architect’s Journal. Local critics see the development as a “two-fingered salute.” The site had previously won permission for a pair of 41- and 31-story towers designed by London’s Squire & Partners, and residents, as well as non-profit groups, are gearing up to contest the development. “Although these buildings are better ­designed than the Squires ones, this application is attempting to add more height by stealth,” architect Barbara Weiss told the Architect’s Journal. ‘The River Thames is becoming a canyon and the price to the skyline of Boris Johnson’s liberal approach to tall buildings is becoming increasingly clear.” Other than the project’s height, advocates are also outraged over the lack of specific affordable housing promises, the decrease in residential units from the prior Squires plan, and the projected traffic congestion the project would cause. Compounding the controversy is that the ZHA towers would rise next to the iconic Vauxhall bus station, which was designed by ARUP in 2005 and now faces demolition only 13 years later. ZHA has for their part, pushed back against the controversy and claimed that fears of congestion or shadows were without merit. Jim Heverin, ZHA’s director, told the AJ that the studio was still in talks with the project’s developer over finalizing the number of affordable housing units. ‘When we came onto this scheme, it was right that we looked at the heights,’ said Heverin. “We evolved the scheme to create a new public square. Our scheme takes less land on the ground but is higher. There is a lot more density coming into this area. Our project fits within a master plan that has been looked at by Transport for London.” The soaring Vauxhall towers plan would seem to fit well with ZHA head Patrick Schumacher’s fondness for density and what the Guardian has called a propensity for “neoliberal privatization schemes.”
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Gingerbread City draws Zaha Hadid, Foster + Partners and more to London for the holidays

Nearly 50 well known architecture, engineering, and landscape architecture firms have teamed up to bring a massive edible exhibition to life, as London’s Museum of Architecture hosts its annual Gingerbread City show. Master planned and sponsored by Tibbalds Planning and Urban Design, the utopian cookie metropolis is built to 1:100 scale and comprised of four neighborhoods. Old Town, which has twisting, narrow streets and is centered around Crumble Square, an industrialized New Town with a Central Baking District, a waterside energy district, and “eco-town”. The vastly differing styles of each neighborhood allowed the museum to feature every architectural typology, while designers were free to experiment in every style. Participants were asked to design for one of four categories, housing, landscapes, landmark buildings, or bridges, but with the caveat that they had to bake and decorate the gingerbread themselves. Foster + Partners, Zaha Hadid Architects, NBBJ, Periscope, Pitman Tozer, Burwell Deakins and dozens of other studios have all contributed to the Gingerbread City, including several bridges which link the distinct districts together. Zaha Hadid Architects and Foster + Partners were each given entire inidvidual islands in the eco-town to decorate as they wished. Because gingerbread is a finicky material to build with, firms had to find ways to keep their buildings structurally sound, while still being edible. Sugar glass, gumdrops, frosting and melted candy were all turned into supporting elements. But even the most intelligently designed cookie building is vulnerable to the elements. Speaking with CNN, museum director Melissa Woolford said that humidity inside the museum wreaked havoc on last year’s display, and that several buildings had collapsed in 2016’s show. Gingerbread City will be on display at the Museum of Architecture until this Friday, December 22nd.
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Zaha Hadid Architects, Arcplus, and Wilson Associates join forces to offer comprehensive project services

Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA), Arcplus, and Wilson Associates have teamed up to offer comprehensive design, architecture, and engineering services to clients across the globe. With over 7,000 employees, Arcplus is the largest design group in China. The firm focuses on civic and commercial architecture, as well as transportation. Wilson Associates, meanwhile, works primarily in high-end hospitality and interiors. Recent projects include the Hilton Chengdu in Chengdu, China and the Montage Kapalua Bay, Hawaii. And ZHA almost doesn't need an introduction—with offices on three continents, the firm's 400 designers are currently working on more than 60 projects worldwide. In addition to project collaboration, the team will also research high-rise buildings (though ZHA's latest skyscraper, 666 Fifth Avenue, may be off the table for good). “We see this alliance as a continuation of global best practice, pioneering research and innovation, where each of the three firms' individual strengths will deliver the most ambitious projects," Zaha Hadid Architects explained in a prepared statement. "The combination of design excellence, resources, knowledge and sector leading expertise enables us to deliver more sophisticated, high-performance and high-value projects.” The collaboration will be celebrated in London and New York, following a ribbon cutting ceremony and partnership agreement in Shanghai.
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A closer look at Zaha Hadid’s first residential property in New York

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Originally unveiled in 2013, Zaha Hadid’s first residential property in New York is nearing completion. Situated on the High Line in close proximity to Hudson Yards, one of NYC’s largest developments, the intimate building offers 39 condo units, many of which include private vestibules and entrances. The project is perhaps the epitome of luxury “21st-century dwelling” in New York, but for all of its loaded amenities catering to private residents–an automated valet, one of the first private IMAX theatres in the world, advanced home automation capabilities, 24-hour gym, juice bar, private automated storage accessed via a secured viewing room (inspired by the design of a Swiss bank vault nonetheless)–the architects say the essence of this project is about an urban contextual response that results in a building that doubles as public art for passersby to enjoy. This dynamic plays out in the building envelope, a sculptural expression of hand-rubbed steel that weaves between motorized doors, windows, and curved glass units. Ed Gaskin, senior associate at Zaha Hadid Architects, said “in the great tradition of quintessential New York buildings, such as Rockefeller Center and the Chrysler Building, 520 West 28th is a building that seeks to improve the public realm through art and architecture.”
  • Facade Manufacturer M. Cohen and Sons (exterior metal cladding and railings); Stahlbau Pichler GmbH/Srl (curtain wall and window wall); Sunglass (glazing)
  • Architects Zaha Hadid Ltd; Ismael Leyva Architects (Architect of Record)
  • Facade Installer M. Cohen and Sons
  • Facade Consultants Gilsanz Murray Steficek
  • Location New York, NY
  • Date of Completion 2017
  • System curtain wall over flat slab concrete frame
  • Products Aluminum frame curtain wall and window wall; handcrafted exterior metal cladding panels; Large scale curved glass; custom motorized sliding doors; custom motorized operable windows
The proximity of the High Line was particularly important for the architects, who say they were inspired by the overlay of public space near the site, namely the contrast between an elevated free-flowing High Line pathway with the urban grid of streets below. In response, the architects developed an “urban layering” concept that resulted in split levels, challenging the orthodoxy of flat floor plate construction. The resulting split-level configuration is articulated by a continuous chevron ribbon composed of a 900-piece hand-rubbed steel panel installation. “Rather than a staggered zigzag climbing the facade from floor to floor, the chevron is a continuous line, extending along and framing living spaces, bending around the soft curves of unbroken panoramic glass corners and wrapping the facade in free flowing lines each connected and looping continuously from one floor to the next,” said Gaskin. “Balconies and set-back terraces further express a sense of layering in the urban fabric heightened by balconies projecting and dynamically gesturing toward the High Line where it meets the site.” The metal facade was meticulously hand-crafted from stainless steel, recalling the spirit of Chelsea’s industrial past. The panels were engineered, cut, and welded by M. Cohen and Sons, a Philadelphia-based metal fabrication group offering design assist, engineering, project management, and installation services. They achieved a lustrous blackened finish by an antiquing process, light orbital brushing and hand tinting, to produce an effect that resonates with the adjacent elevated rail structure of the High Line.   The structuring of the 11-story building was achieved with a conventional flat plate in-situ reinforced concrete. Local areas of post-tensioning were required where cantilevered floors and balconies exceed the limits of flat plate spans.   Glazing design was key to the energy and visual performance of the building envelope. Insulated glazing units (IGU’s) track continuously around flat and radiused segments of the perimeter of the building. IGUs are composed of a layered assembly of three low iron glass panels, two of which are laminated together, with an air void along with low-e coatings for solar protection. The transition between flat and curved units was greatly scrutinized by the project team to ensure visual clarity and color consistency across the fluid expression of the building envelope. One of the challenges, however, was the convex and concave curvatures of the design required varied glazing manufacturing processes which yielded slightly different visual results. The major difference between concave and convex glazing was the location of the coating surface, which produced an “almost imperceptible change in color” according to Gaskin, who said the team “exploited architectural conditions to minimize the visual impact of these differences.” The concave units were located in full shade at deep balcony recesses, contrasting with exposed conditions of the convex units. Gaskin said this contrast of conditions assisted in masking the already subtle differences in glazing appearance. Additionally, during the product sourcing phase, the project team’s attention was focused on testing the supplier’s capability to deliver consistent quality through production and inspection of full-scale mock-ups. This attention to detail ultimately resulted in a “continuity of quality,” according to Gaskin, which was achieved by “understanding material qualities, impacts of manufacturing techniques and working with suppliers to coordinate and test results across different types of glass manufacturing and window unit assemblies.” The project complied with all code requirements, maximizing gross floor area (GFA), building height, and standard setback conformance. The IGUs were installed in a curtain wall system that hung on the outside of floor decks to fully enclose the building. These were selected after design simulation models of thermal and energy performance, which compared the assembly to more commonly-specified window wall systems which sit between floor decks. Gaskin said the facade design at 520 W 28th “successfully demonstrates a way of achieving dynamic and organic sculptural form by repetition of a limited number of standard cladding panel types. Further, use of common installation details and practices allows us to apply the best practices for envelope performance and costs.”
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MVRDV's stacked desires, Zaha Hadid's latticework roofs, and other updates from the architects of Instagram

At The Architect’s Newspaper, we’re plain addicted to Instagram. Sure, we love seeing Brutalist concrete through “Inkwell” or “Ludwig” filters, but there’s also no better place to see where architects are getting their inspiration, how they’re documenting the built environment, and where they’ve traveled of late. Below, we bring you some of the best Instagrams of this past week! (Also, don’t forget to check out our Instagram account here.) Last Friday, Rotterdam-based firm MVRDV opened The Why Factory (W)ego: The Future City is Flexible, a bright new installation for Dutch Design Week 2017 in Eindhoven. According to MVRDV co-director Winy Maas, the project is "based on the hypothesis that the maximum density could be equal to the maximum of desires." https://www.instagram.com/p/BaguLgZBAbV/?taken-by=mvrdv AN contributor and designer Adam Nathaniel Furman shared an alarmingly value-engineered facade in the UK. Beneath the fake brick, a hollow duct–a compelling metaphor for our current newscape. In the comments, there is a bit of hope: Furman and friends list British architects who would never do such a thing, like Sergison Bates, FAT Architects, Outram, or Caruso St. John. https://www.instagram.com/p/Baqmp7ag80u/ Bloomberg is getting a new $1.3 billion, Foster+Partners-designed headquarters in London. The bronze fin-covered building boasts artwork and installations by Cristina Iglesias, Michael Craig-Martin, Olafur Eliasson, and Langlands & Bell. Eliasson's No future is possible without a past crowns a central room within the building, resembling the silvery surface of a pond inverted onto the ceiling. https://www.instagram.com/p/Ban9Gxvnt8u/?taken-by=studioolafureliasson Zaha Hadid Architects completed the King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Centre (KAPSARC) in Riyadh, the capital of Saudi Arabia. The 70,000-square-foot, five-building complex includes an auditorium, library, exhibit hall, and a prayer room sheathed in white latticework (pictured below).  https://www.instagram.com/p/Barov2bFJr6/?taken-by=zahahadidarchitects
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Take a look at Zaha Hadid Architects' dog house design

While Zaha Hadid Architects' 666 Fifth Avenue Tower is in legitimate peril, fans of the architect have something to cheer, or in some cases, howl about. The firm has designed its first dog kennel, a cocoon-like, CNC milled plywood design called "Cloud." Designed for BowWow Haus London, a public exhibition that will aid UK pet charity Blue Cross for Pets, ZHA's barkitecture is slightly elevated above the ground to protect dogs from cold floor surfaces. Other architects and artists participating in BowWow Haus London—most of them located in London and surrounding cities— have created dog houses that range from frilly traditional to austere modernist to flat-out psychedelic. Jia-hao Syu's Bark-alona Pavilion comes with a small reflecting pool/ water bowl and a structurally exposed glass roof; Denise Jaques' Mosaic Happy is covered in a kaleidoscope of colorful mosaic tiles; and Ivan Djidjev's is basically a doggy Greek Temple. See more designs in the gallery above. The completed designs will be displayed at venues around London starting early next year, and will be auctioned at a gala in late spring.
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Zaha Hadid's supertall Kushner Companies building thrown into uncertainty

The major redevelopment of the Kushner Companies' 666 Fifth Avenue building by Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) may be stalled for good. According to Bloomberg, Kushner's partner on the project, Vornado Realty Trust, has decided to simply renovate the site's existing structure. Kushner's original plan, with designs by ZHA, was to strip the current building down to its steel core and extend it up into a 1,400-foot-tall slender cigarette of a tower. The building would have included luxury condos and office space as well as a five-story mall. Currently the property, a 1957 Carson & Lundin-designed aluminum panel building, is a sturdy 41 stories with its unforgettable address displayed in huge numerals at its peak. In ZHA's plan, the development would have been rechristened 660 Fifth Avenue, distancing itself a bit from the connotations of its current address. When the renderings for the new tower were released earlier this year, finding investors for the project proved difficult. Some were concerned by a potential conflict of interest as Kushner Companies' former director, Jared Kushner, left to serve as the senior advisor to his father-in-law, President Donald J. Trump. Anbang Insurance Group, a Chinese conglomerate, pulled out of investment negotiations with Kushner in late March, dealing a significant blow to the development's progress. Now that Vornado has refocused its attention as well, ZHA's design is on hold. Both of the partnering organizations have vastly different stakes. Vornado spent $80 million for its share of the project with money drawn from a secure portfolio of properties. Kushner Companies had to withdraw the costs for their share–$30 million–from the property itself, having struggled to find investors since the beginning of the Trump presidency. Politics aside, it looks for now like Midtown Manhattan won't be getting Hadid's steel-frame torpedo. Those interested in renting an apartment at 666 Fifth Avenue (which were estimated to go at $6,000 per square foot) can perhaps plead for a condo exchange at ZHA's new residences in Chelsea at 520 West 28th Street.
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REVEALED: Two interiors of Zaha Hadid's 520 West 28th

The first images of furnished interiors from Zaha Hadid's 520 West 28th Street in Chelsea—located by The High Line—have been unveiled. The images reveal a 4,500-square-foot, $15 million, four-bedroom condo that looks over The High Line with views onto the Empire State Building and a smaller, 1,700-square-foot apartment. Designer Jennifer Post provided the furniture and decor for the former, being commissioned by developer Related Companies. She used a mixed palette of soft tones and vibrant colors that populate the extravagant interior space. "I am usually the creative visionary behind both the architecture and interior design of a space," said Post in a press release. "Here, I am respectfully creating a vision that coexists with the vision of one of architecture's greatest minds. This prompted me to really consider every move, every decision in a different, special way." For the smaller living unit (which will cost $4.9 million) West Chin, principal of West Chin Architects, employed a minimalist aesthetic when designing the condo's interior. 520 West 28th rises to 11 stories and offers 39 residences that vary from two to five bedrooms. They range in price from $4.95 million to $50 million—the latter getting you a triplex penthouse. It will also be outfitted with a 2,500-square-foot sculpture deck, art from Friends of the High Line, an automated underground parking lot with a robot-operated storage facility, a double-height lobby, an entertainment lounge, and a 12-seat IMAX screening room. The development will also include a 75-foot pool, a gym, and a luxury spa suite equipped with a spa pool, cold plunge pool, waterfall shower, sauna, steam room, chaise lounges, and massage beds. Construction is edging closer to completion. Move in dates are expected around June this year. Both Jennifer Post's and West Chin's model dwellings will be used as sales galleries for the building.
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Inside Zaha Hadid Architects' under-construction One Thousand Museum in Miami

When 62 floors accommodate 83 living units, you can presume listings will not include the words “cozy” and “poky.” This, along with the fact that Zaha Hadid Architects’ (ZHA) residential high-rise in Downtown Miami is virtually column-free inside, residents can expect plenty of room—and a glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) panel or two.

Located on the water’s edge and overlooking Herzog & de Meuron’s Pérez Art Museum, ZHA’s One Thousand Museum’s curvaceous exoskeleton makes a statement. In accordance with the vernacular of condominium buildings in the city, the structural framework is all white, but that’s where the building’s flirtation with Miami modernism ends.

Instead of the once-standard stucco-and-white-paint procedure, GFRC comprises the exoskeleton’s casing. “There was an idea from the start that we wanted the architectural and structural expression to be synthesized,” said Chris Lépine, associate director at ZHA. “We wanted a very fluid exoskeleton.”

Manufactured in Dubai by cladding fabricators Arabian Profiles, 4,800 pieces of GFRC are in the process of being shipped to South Florida. Upon arriving in the Port of Miami, they are taken west to Doral, Florida, to be processed, then back to a prep yard in Miami, and finally onto the construction site.

GFRC was first used by ZHA on the Heydar Aliyev Center in Baku, Azerbaijan, where the material was used purely for cladding. In Miami, however, GFRC acts as formwork for poured concrete. This casing is assembled off-site to ensure quality control and continues its use as the exoskeleton’s finish. “It is all part of the building process, it’s not simply a cosmetic piece,” said Lépine.

Billowing at the base, gill-like forms comprise the tower’s eight parking levels. The gills act as such, providing natural ventilation to the garage area while also instigating a sense of verticality at street level. The curves coalesce and continue their way up the building, bulging at around two-thirds of the way up. Like the GFRC casing, this too was not an aesthetic choice. The wider section accommodates the structural load of the 54 floors above, including a rooftop helipad and a two-story penthouse at what Lépine described as the building’s “crown.”

While serving as a structural device and taking on the typical billowing form ascribed to Hadid’s aesthetic, the exoskeleton also produces wide-open floorplans. “We wanted it, to a degree, to reflect what was going on inside the building,” said Lépine. In addition to the penthouse, there are eight full-floor apartments and 70 half-floor units.

Much of the enclosure is set back from the face of the exoskeleton with the glazing system being abutted and sealed to the structure, thus allowing for apartments to be self-shaded. The exoskeleton is expressed inside with the GFRC entering apartments. It can also be touched. (There’s no fear of heat loss through thermal bridging in Miami.) Balconies are further recessed, “almost created as depressions behind the structure,” Lépine said, and result in the glass facade folding and faceting behind. “There is a nice interplay between the two materials, as well as with how light casts down upon the structure and fenestration,” he added.

Aside from palatial living units, One Thousand Museum is laden with luxury amenities: thirty thousand square feet of communal areas, including a two-story aquatic center, a sky lounge, a multimedia theater, a wellness spa, gym facilities, and a private event space—naturally, a “bank quality” vault is also included.

Ground broke on the building in December 2014. During the summer of 2015, one thousand trucks rolled onto site to pour 9,500 cubic yards of concrete in 24 hours to start the One Thousand Museum’s foundational work. The building is currently due for completion in 2018.

Resources

Developers: Louis Birdman, Gregg Covin, Kevin Venger, and the Regalia Group

Structural Engineer: DeSimone Consulting Engineers Construction: Plaza Construction Landscape Design: Enea Landscape Architecture Local Architect: O’Donnell Dannwolf & Partners Architects Interior Lighting:  Uli + Friends
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Rendering revealed of Zaha Hadid Architects design for 666 Fifth Ave.

[3/29/2017 — UPDATE: Anbang backs out of negotiations to redevelop 666 Fifth via The Real Deal] Plans to convert the existing building at 666 Fifth Avenue, a long-idled development project owned by Kushner Companies and Vornado Realty Trust, might yet see the light of day as foreign investors indicate their interest in financing the tower. Kushner Companies was led by son-in-law to President Donald Trump and former CEO Jared Kushner until mid-January when he relinquished his control over the company and formally divested his stake in 666 Fifth Avenue. Though some have questioned the significance of these measures to sever himself from the project, Kushner will purportedly no longer have a formal role as it moves forward and will recuse himself if any conflict-of-interest should arise. Yet, Kushner’s precarious web of financial entanglements could potentially haunt him. Shortly before his departure from his family's business, Kushner negotiated investment talks with Anbang Insurance Group, a Chinese company shrouded by opaque ownership and known associations with the Chinese state. In a report by 6sqft, sources say that Anbang has been involved in “advanced talks to provide as much as half of the $2.5 billion in equity for the planned redevelopment.” Though the company has denied it is a stakeholder in the 666 Fifth Avenue project, the deal seems to support its growing portfolio of real estate investments in New York City as they are also the owners of nearby Waldorf Astoria Hotel. The building will require a substantial redesign of the existing structural core to accommodate an additional 40 stories, a task to be resolved by London-based Zaha Hadid Architects (ZHA) which recently circulated a rendering of the ambitious 1,400-foot-tall tower. ZHA has been signed up for the project since 2015 and later this year will wrap construction on its first project in New York City, a residential building adjacent to the High Line. If all goes as intended, demolition will begin in 2019 with a desired completion by 2025.