Posts tagged with "Walter Hood":

Placeholder Alt Text

Jury is announced for Adelaide Contemporary museum competition

The Adelaide Contemporary International Design Competition has announced the jury members selected to judge the competition, which will commission a new contemporary art museum and public sculpture park dedicated to Australian, Aboriginal, Asian and European art in Adelaide, Australia. Last December, the shortlisted firms were announced, and among the 13 firms grouped into six teams were Adjaye Associates, SO-IL and Diller Scofidio + Renfro, along with Australia-based firms BVN, Hassell, Woods Bagot and Durbach Block Jaggers. The nine-person jury is comprised of leaders in the arts, architecture, culture and business, including Walter Hood and Toshiko Mori. The competition jury will be chaired by Michael Lynch and advised by the competition director, Malcolm Reading. The full jury is below:
  • Michael Lynch AO CBE (Chair), Chair, Sydney Community Foundation and Chair, Circa
  • Lee-Ann Tjunypa Buckskin, Deputy Chair, Australia Council for the Arts, Managing Director, L-AB & Associates and Executive, Aboriginal Strategy, South Australian Film Corporation
  • Beatrice Galilee, Associate Curator of Architecture and Design, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  • Walter Hood, Creative Director and Founder, Hood Design Studio
  • David Knox, Deputy Chair, Economic Development Board of South Australia and Member, Adelaide Botanic Gardens Foundation Committee
  • Nick Mitzevich, Director, Art Gallery of South Australia
  • Toshiko Mori, Founder and Principal, Toshiko Mori Architect and Robert P. Hubbard Professor in the Practice of Architecture at Harvard University Graduate School of Design
  • Sally Smart, Vice-Chancellor’s Professorial Fellow, University of Melbourne and renowned contemporary artist
  • Tracey Whiting, Chair, Art Gallery of South Australia Board

In eleven weeks, the six teams will present their conceptual designs, with an honorarium of approximately $72,000 dollars (AU $90,000) to complete this stage. In April, these designs will be shown to the public at an exhibition in Adelaide as well as online. Details about that exhibition will be released then. The jury will decide upon the winner in May and the winners will be announced by mid-June of this year. Further updates to the competition can be found at the competition's website.

Placeholder Alt Text

The Broad-adjacent Otium opens with Damien Hirst on the menu

Otium, the restaurant tucked in The Broad’s Barouni olive-treed, 24,000-square-foot public plaza, quietly opened last week in Downtown Los Angeles. The sum of chef Otium Timothy Hollingsworth and restaurateur Bill Chait, a lot is riding on the eatery to enliven Grand Avenue and the Diller Scofidio + Renfro / Walter Hood pocket park. Designed by Studio UNTLD and House of Honey with building architect Osvaldo Maiozzi, Otium is a boxy, steel-and-wood-clad structure that owes more architecturally to midcentury mods like Craig Ellwood or Ray Kappe than to DS+R’s museum. The traditional California burring inside and outside drive the glazed walls and expansive patio seating. Farm-to-table ethos clearly is behind vertical gardens from Green City Farms on the restaurant’s rooftop that are ready to provide the chef with herbs, vegetables and edible flowers. Inside the box is a large dining room and open kitchen. Windows look west over Hope Street, a view rarely emphasized up on Bunker Hill. According to the press release, the designers were tasked to compliment Hollingsworth with “sophisticated rusticity,” a phrase that looks good on paper, but jams in the mouth creating a lisp-like noise that is neither. A bounty of natural materials are plentiful: steel, glass, wood, copper, stone, nubby textiles, and ceramics. Or, as the PR explains: “The design is an artful mix of old and new, honest, and refined, that echoes the menu’s offerings.” To link the restaurant to the museum, there’s an exterior mural in the works by artist Damien Hirst. Installed on the south facade and entitled Isolated Elements, 2015, it is an approximately 32-foot high by 84-foot long large-scale photograph based on his 1991 sculpture Isolated Elements Swimming in the Same Direction for the Purpose of Understanding, aka the shark in a tank of formaldehyde. It’s unclear if carnivorous seafood is on the menu.