Posts tagged with "Vancouver":

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Basket-inspired, passive social housing could be coming to Vancouver

A new social housing development for indigenous First Nations peoples has just been revealed for Vancouver, and it draws cues from what might be AN’s favorite design typology: the big basket. First revealed by DailyHive earlier this week, 1766 Frances Street—designed by the Vancouver-based GBL Architects and funded by the nonprofit M’akola Development Services—has a lot more going for it than the basketweave-inspired facade. If completed as proposed, the building would be passive house-certified and rise via a mix of steel framing and exposed cross-laminated timber (CLT) floor plates, with more CLT panels used to clad the envelope and give the building its distinctive look. The nine-story, 88-foot-tall development is slated to hold 84 units across 84,472 square feet specifically for Indigenous residents, and will replace a three-story, 36-unit social housing project that stood in the same spot before being damaged by fire in 2017; it too was set aside exclusively for Indigenous members of the community. Of note from the renderings is the seventh-floor setback that will serve as an amenity space and patio for residents (further reinforcing the basket shape), and exposed CLT interior wall paneling. The zigzagging pavers around the building and panel arrangements reference the “Coast Salish Peoples basket weaving tradition,” according to GBL Architects. The CLT panels on the facade that make up the “weave” itself will cleverly mask balconies and help reduce thermal bridging by not actually touching the envelope. The building will also hold a 25-car underground garage and space for 96 bicycles. M’akola Development Services has submitted a rezoning application for the site, and more information on whether it will move ahead as planned will likely come in the next few months. Vancouver is no stranger to novel social housing inspired by First Nations traditions, or passive house building standards. At the end of last year, the Squamish Nation revealed a proposal to bring 11 towers full of affordable rental housing to their land at Senakw, and before that, in August of 2019, Canadian company Henson Developments unveiled what could be the tallest passive house building in the world for the city’s West End neighborhood.
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Amid soaring rents, these creatives are redefining design on Canada’s West Coast

Since hosting the Winter Olympics in 2010, Vancouver has rapidly ascended to the rank of an international hub of commerce and culture. Projects by local heavyweights Patkau Architects and Bing Thom Architects (now Revery Architecture) dot the city’s skyline, while structures by Bjarke Ingels Group, Shigeru Ban, and Herzog & de Meuron are taking shape. It’s a shift that hasn’t gone unnoticed by the city’s fledgling design scene. Though a number of prominent figures—from celebrated architect Arthur Erickson to artist-turned-author-turned-artist-again Douglas Coupland—have called the West Coast metropolis home, the past decade witnessed another cohort of multihyphenate creatives who have set up shop here. And while much of this physical expansion and economic transformation has resulted in skyrocketing real estate prices, a new generation of designers continue to carve out their own space. With property values rising over 50 percent in the last five years, many studios have found unique ways of working autonomously and together. Among them, collaborative ventures and hyperlocal producers are forging bonds with manufacturers both at home and abroad. From a contemporary blacksmith to a dynamic lighting trio, here are five of the leading practices shaping design in the city. Read the full list on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.  
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Morphosis designs high-tech headquarters for lululemon in Vancouver

Morphosis has been tapped to design the new corporate home of lifestyle athletic wear retailer lululemon in Vancouver, Canada. The new building, known as the Store Support Centre, will serve as the headquarters for lululemon’s global brand. “We are incredibly excited about the next chapter of our story both globally and in our hometown of Vancouver. Our new Store Support Centre will allow us to consolidate our offices and retain, attract, and grow our talent as we deliver on our strategic growth plans,” said Susan Gelinas, SVP of People & Culture at lululemon, in a press statement. The 13-story center is intended to be intimately connected to the surrounding environment. Both interior and exterior spaces will emphasize a focus on community collaboration and innovation. The building’s exterior façade will feature a high-performance brise-soleil system to limit solar heat gain, which will ultimately reduce energy consumption, modulate the interior climate, and open up views of the center’s scenic surroundings. Interior floors, designed in collaboration with L.A.-based architecture and interior design firm Clive Wilkinson Architects and Vancouver’s Francl Architecture, will be centered around a central atrium carved out of the massing to deliver light deep into the building. The atrium will also serve as a social hub, with stairs wrapping around it that connect to each floor and a gathering space for employees. The Store Support Centre will also include a public plaza at the ground level to help integrate it into the larger community, along with retail space and public art along the Great Northern Way. To fully reflect lululemon’s dedication to health and wellness, the design includes abundant access to sunlight, green spaces, and landscaped terraces. lululemon has also enlisted the help of sustainability and wellness consultant Integral to ensure a holistic approach to sustainable design. In a press statement, Morphosis described its excitement regarding the partnership: “We are thrilled to be partnering with lululemon on this project and joining them at an important time in the evolution of the company,” said Thom Mayne, founder and Design Director of Morphosis. No completion date or budget has been provided yet.
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The Pavilion at Great Northern Way revolves with CNC-milled timber and aluminum composite panels

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The Pavilion at Great Northern Way, a florid timber, steel, and glass structure designed by Perkins and Will and fabricated by Canadian timber specialist Spearhead, anchors a new public plaza in the Mount Pleasant neighborhood of Vancouver, British Columbia. The 2,000-square-foot space, which was completed in 2019 and will be home to a coffee shop, abuts the Perkins and Will–designed South Flatz office block and the newly constructed campus of the Emily Carr University of Art + Design.
  • Facade Manufacturer Alucobond Guardian Spearhead Blackcomb Facade Technology
  • Architect Perkins and Will
  • Facade Installer Ledcor Group Keith Panel Systems
  • Facade Consultant RDH Building Science
  • Location Vancouver, British Columbia
  • Date of Completion 2019
  • System RAICO Therm+ A-I system
  • Products Custom laminated strand lumber and glulam Guardian Sunguard SuperNeutral 68 Alucobond aluminum composite
The primary elements of the pavilion are ten overlapping curved “petals” clad in bright-red aluminum composite shingles. The petals are just over 30 feet tall and frame a central, glazed oculus. Initially, the architects sought to achieve the flowing form with nail-laminated timber panels—stacked dimensional lumber held together with nails—shaped by 5-axis CNC sculpting. With a budget of only $1.4 million, however, this method proved cost-prohibitive. Instead, Spearhead developed a waffle framing model built from economic laminated strand lumber and glulam sculpted with a 3-axis CNC machine, an approach that significantly reduced the volume of material required for the pavilion and facilitated the straightforward installation of insulation and MEP infrastructure. Streamlining the broad contours of the pavilion did not diminish the project’s hybrid, kit-of-parts complexity. The shear wall system consists of curved plate steel reinforced with glulam on either side, while the slender profile of the upper roof layer relies on CNC-cut plate steel columns laterally supported by engineered wood components. Both the roof diaphragm and the shear wall system are sheathed in plywood; moments of extreme curvature are decked with layers of thin plywood laminated together. Narrow strips of birch plywood were applied to the interior and overlap as curved drop siding. In total, there are approximately 6,950 custom CNC-cut wood components, 875 custom CNC structural steel parts, and 1,350 Simpson brackets. Blackcomb Facade Technology, a frequent Spearhead collaborator with particular expertise in complex assemblies and hybrid structures, handled the five curved glazed bays for the pavilion using a RAICO Therm+ A-I system with Guardian SunGuard glass.
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Squamish Nation approves $3 billion housing development in Vancouver

The Squamish First Nation’s plans to build a 6,000-unit residential development in Vancouver has taken a major step forward as the community voted in favor of the Revery Architecture-designed project on December 10. Eighty-seven percent of members voted in support of construction, which will be made possible through a 50-50 partnership with the developer Westbank.  Last Thursday, new renderings of the $3-billion, 11-tower development were published by The Daily Hive and they illustrate just how radically the project would transform the city’s Kitsilano neighborhood. Located on the reserve lands at Sen̓áḵw, the project will be Canada’s largest development on First Nations land. Because of this location, the city of Vancouver will have no ability to regulate what is built; however, this doesn’t mean that the Squamish Planning Group won’t work closely with the city on the vision for the site.  In 2014, the City of Vancouver was designated as a City of Reconciliation and outlined goals to “form a sustained relationship, mutual respect, and understanding with local First Nations and the Urban Indigenous community,” as well as “promote Indigenous peoples arts, culture, and awareness.” This project is just one example of these values being put into action. “It’s a change for us, but we deserve it,” Chief Janice George told CBC. “We deserve to benefit from this land, just like everybody else in Vancouver.”  The 11.7-acre development will be situated near the foot of the Burrard Bridge on a 500-acre parcel of land and will transform the existing neighborhood into a dense urban center. Out of the 11 towers, the tallest is expected to reach 56 stories. Between 70-and-90 percent of the units will be designated as market rental units and the rest will be leased as condominiums.  “The Squamish Nation is thrilled with the outcome of this referendum, which was approved by a landslide. It is truly a landmark moment in our Nation’s history,” wrote Squamish Nation councilor Khelsilem, in a statement on Facebook. “The Sen̓áḵw Project will transform the Squamish Nation by providing immense social, cultural, and economic benefits to Squamish Nation members for generations to come.” Construction of the first phase is expected to begin in 2021.
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Squamish First Nation development could bring 11 towers to Vancouver

The Squamish First Nation’s extensive plans to build upon their land in Vancouver, Canada, have doubled since an initial announcement in April. According to a report by the Vancouver Sun, a new proposal for 6,000 units across 11 towers within the 500-acre land parcel, with the goal of coming in under the minimum parking requirements. This marks a major shift from the previous proposal, which originally only showed a two-tower development with 3,000 units. The project would radically transform the city's Kitsilano neighborhood from a low-rise residential area to a dense urban center. The project, named Senakw after the site it occupies, is expected to ring up at an estimated cost of 3 billion CAD. As Senakw is situated within the reserve boundaries of the Squamish band government, the Squamish Nation is not required to comply with the City of Vancouver’s regulations and processes regarding development, meaning construction could begin rather quickly and without the typical oversight delays. The Squamish planning group hopes to work closely with Vancouver city staff to construct a cohesive vision for the site. Since the projected is not limited by municipal zoning, initial renderings by Vancouver's Revery Architecture depict an unconventional vision. Located near the foot of the Burrard Bridge, the cluster of towers, with their undulating balconies and "fins" will make an instant mark on Vancouver’s skyline, with the tallest expected to top out at 56 stories. The towers will not make use of the podium design typical in projects of this scale, instead making 80 percent of the ground-level land available for public use and green space. According to Squamish Councilor Khelsilem, the ideas for 6,000 “mostly rental” units stems from a critical shortage of rental housing in Vancouver. Moreover, the development holds importance in the context of the historical treatment of indigenous peoples in the Vancouver area: “This is a government doing a project that has a particular history of injustice in the removal of our ancestors in 1913, who were evicted by the provincial government at the request of the Vancouver parks board and the City of Vancouver,” said Councilor Khelsilem. Final decisions for the project will be made in December when the band government votes in a referendum.
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Scott & Scott Architects crafts a monochromatic facial bar in Vancouver

Far from the flickering fluorescent lights and bleached-white surfaces of most clinical environments, self-proclaimed “world’s first clean skincare bar” Fig—the latest addition to Vancouver’s trendy Kitsilano neighborhood—challenges the sterile tropes of healthcare spaces. Behind an unassuming 1900s-era facade is a rich, tonal boutique replete with velvet, metal, marble, and more, all courtesy of local practice Scott & Scott Architects. Borrowing from the brand’s moniker, the 400 square-foot space is a monochromatic study in layered tones of viridian, olive, and sage. “The color range of a fig is utilized to create a relaxed experience with soft acoustics and illumination,” Scott & Scott principal Susan Scott explained about his and his partner’s evocative choice of materials. Thick full-height velvet curtains define three skin treatment and injection rooms; each with its own Japanese barber chair and hanging metal number plate. To capitalize on the compact interior, Scott & Scott stripped back the ceiling to the full height of the existing rafters, which were then clad in rows of curved perforated steel with a desaturated mint coating. The resulting coffered ceiling integrates indirect lighting while concealing HVAC and electrical equipment. A series of scalloped metal forms continue from the roof to line the surface of a single wall and create a dimensional product display. Circular glass shelves, storage for inventory, and a washbasin to test various skincare items are integrated into these alcoves. Dark green marble tops the central counter, product storage units, and a low bench to further emphasize the nature-inspired palette. Read the full article on our interiors and design website, aninteriormag.com.
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World's tallest passive house tower could rise in Vancouver's West End

Canadian company Henson Developments is planning the world’s tallest passive house for downtown Vancouver. Slated for the edge of the city's West End neighborhood, 1075 Nelson would stand 60 stories tall, hovering higher than most towers in British Columbia and with three times the efficiency.  The Vancouver Courier reported that the City of Vancouver is currently reviewing Henson’s rezoning application and after that, it will go before the city council for a public hearing. Sean Pander, who serves as the city’s green building manager, believes the 555-foot-tall project will push other developers to pursue more eco-friendly projects. It’s located in a vibrant, largely residential part of town where there is rapid growth. “What makes it a really big deal is the amount of attention it will get with the public, as well as with developers, designers, manufacturers of windows,” said Pander in an interview with the Courier.   But Rick Gregory, vice-president of Henson Developments, isn’t looking to build a basic, boxy tower with an ultra-tight envelope, he said. Both of the two top tallest passive house buildings in the world are rather square: Bolueta by VArquitectors in Bilbao, Spain, and the 250-foot tall residential structure by Handel Architects at Cornell Tech. Gregory wanted 1075 Nelson to be architecturally-significant. “There is a certain look that Passive House generally yields and we’re trying to move away from that to make it much more attractive to other people to take the same approach," he told the Courier. To achieve this, Gregory enlisted the help of British architect Tom Wright of WKK Architects and Gwyn Vose, director of IBI Group. Early renderings reveal an undulating structure with large loggia spaces in the center voids spanning multiple floors. While it’s likely Henson Developments will get support for some sort of passive house construction—Vancouver released its own zero-emissions building plan in 2016—Gregory's goal of building an atypical design that’s the tallest in the world could prove more difficult if it ultimately means more money spent.
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Matter Design and CEMEX conjure monumental concrete constructs for TED 2019

TED 2019, a week of speaker sessions, workshops, and conversations about the directions technological and political progress are leading society, has touched down in Vancouver. Appropriately enough, the Cambridge, Massachusetts–based firm Matter Design and CEMEX Global R&D have used the event to unveil the fruits of their concrete research. Matter Design is no stranger to experimental stonework (nor is CEMEX, for that matter). Engineering tightly-interlocking slabs and complex concrete forms have been a constant in their research, and both Janus and Walking Assembly take their explorations to the next level. Janus was originally revealed simultaneously last year at the American Academy in Rome and on the campus of MIT. Matter Design and CEMEX teamed with composers Federico Gardella and Simone Confort to create a multi-sensory experience that demonstrates how heavy masses can still move with a rollicking sense of joy. In a video of the display of Janus, a crescendo of whispers draws the crowd’s attention to the stage, where they’re presented, in both senses of the word, with an enormous box mocked up to resemble Rome’s four-gated Arch of Janus. The blue, orange, and pink box slowly flops over to reveal that it’s simply a wrapper, and from it emerges a massive concrete wrecking ball, or kettle ball–shaped object. Emphasizing the split nature of the Roman god that Janus takes its name from, the concrete object, a solid ball with a hollow handle on top, wobbles and spins but always returns to an upright position. Walking Assembly continues on the theme of playfully rocking solid concrete masses with another historical twist. How did ancient peoples move the Moai of Easter Island? One theory is that these massive statues were designed to be “walked,” or gradually rocked, into place. Walking Assembly, seeking to divorce the concept of masonry’s scale from that of the humans placing it, returns to these preindustrial construction techniques. These massive masonry units (MMUs) are designed to be moved and fit into place without the help of cranes or other construction equipment. Using rounded edges, handle points, and by pouring variable-density concrete to control each MMU’s center of gravity, the components can be easily rocked, tilted, and rolled into place. Both projects, through using computer modeling and advanced fabrication technology, force the objects themselves to do the heavy lifting and free the user, or construction worker, to play around with the components. It's a fitting tie-in for a conference probing where technology can take us.
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Herzog & de Meuron reveals revamped Vancouver Art Gallery

Herzog & de Meuron has finalized the design of the 300,000-square-foot Vancouver Art Gallery and has released new renderings of the top-heavy timber building. The $350 million arts complex in Vancouver, Canada, also has a new name. After a $40 million private donation from the Chan family on January 23, the Vancouver Art Gallery (the organization responsible for the building’s programming) announced that the building would be renamed the Chan Centre for the Visual Arts. The gift is the largest single private donation in the history of British Columbia and has brought the amount raised for the building to $85 million. That marks an important figure as the provincial government has pledged that it would donate $50 million if the Vancouver Art Gallery were able to raise $100 million in private funds. The newly-revealed design for the Chan Centre presents an airy update to the scheme that was initially presented in 2015. Herzog & de Meuron has kept the stacked, seven-story massing, but replaced the opaque timber facade with fluted glass screens that are supposed to resemble stacked logs. The building rises from a narrow footprint to cut down on its impact on the street and create a covered open-air courtyard at ground level. The arts center expands as it rises, creating covered areas protected from the summer sun and winter rain and snow. It appears that Herzog & de Meuron has leaned more heavily into timber than in the original scheme, using wood for a majority of the interior finishes, columns, and supportive elements. Once complete, the center will hold classrooms, 85,000 square feet of gallery spaces, a theater, reading rooms, shops, and restaurants. Even the building’s location is hub-like; it lies at the intersection of the Downtown Vancouver, East Vancouver, Chinatown, Yaletown, and Gastown neighborhoods. “The project for the new Vancouver Art Gallery has a civic dimension that can contribute to the life and identity of the city,” said senior Herzog & de Meuron partner Christine Binswanger, “in which many artists of international reputation live and work. The building now combines two materials, wood and glass, both inseparable from the history and making of the city. We developed a facade out of glass logs which is pure, soft, light, establishing a unique relation to covered wooden terraces all around the building.” Fundraising is ongoing, with the Vancouver Art Gallery looking to raise $300 million for the building’s construction and $50 million to establish an endowment. If all goes as planned, construction is expected to start either late this year or in early 2020, with an opening planned for some time in 2023. Perkins+Will Vancouver is the project’s executive architects.
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This 18-story building went up in 66 days thanks to the right mass timber products

When it came time for Acton Ostry Architects to select a manufacturer for the mass timber components of the 18-story Brock Commons Tallwood House at the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, Canada, Structurlam stood out.

“Experience, qualifications, supply, schedule, cost” all worked to Structurlam’s benefit, according to Russell Acton, principal at Acton Ostry. Acton explained that along with supplying mass wood structural components, Structurlam provided end-to-end oversight and support by “[collaborating] with the structural engineer, construction manager, and mass wood erector to refine the design and optimize cost, quality, and constructibility considerations for the mass wood components.”

As a result of Structurlam’s comprehensive approach, the hybrid concrete-and-mass-timber structure building was erected in record time: just 66 days. The tower features 1,302 10-inch-by-10-inch Douglas Fir Glulam columns and 464 Douglas fir CLT panels of varying thicknesses, all fabricated by Structurlam.

But don’t think that all that wood is going to be hidden behind the project’s fire-resistant Type X gypsum wallboards. Instead, wood finishes cover the building inside and out. That includes the dormitory’s shared spaces, where JSV Architectural Veneering & Millwork has crafted maple veneer panels and wood grilles for the project. In other areas, 24-inch-by-24-inch albus wood ceiling panels by Linea Ceiling provide a “decorative and functional” alternative to conventional acoustic drop-down ceilings.

Design Architect: Acton Ostry Architects Construction: Urban One Builders Mass Timber Fabricator: Structurlam Facade Fabricator and Installer: Centura Building Systems Punched Window Manufacturer: Phoenix Glass Custom Interior Millwork: JSV Architectural Veneering & Millwork Drop Ceiling Fabricator: Linea Ceiling & Wall Systems Door Manufacturer: McGregor & Thompson
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Jeanne Gang and Renzo Piano are making their mark on Canada with a spate of new projects

It’s time to go north of the border as The Architect’s Newspaper checks out some of the highest-profile projects that have been announced across Canada this year. A strong economy has driven construction across the country, and Toronto, in particular, has an abundance of notable buildings breaking ground. From subdued civic structures to prismatic rental towers, 2018 has brought a surfeit of high-profile projects to America’s northern neighbor. One Delisle Studio Gang Toronto, Ontario Studio Gang could end up making a major mark on Toronto’s skyline with its first Canadian project, a 48-story multifaceted tower. The rental building has been designed with 16 sides made up of overlapping eight-story hexagonal modules, and each segment will contain enclosed balconies and be topped with garden terraces for residents. The overlap of the modules resembles scales or the natural spiraling of growing plants, and the effect creates a different view of the tower depending on the angle of approach. An existing 1929 Art Deco facade will be moved over to the base of a neighboring tower, and the base of One Delisle will relate to the historic facade to maintain a cogent street wall. Toronto Courthouse Renzo Piano Building Workshop and NORR Architects & Engineers Toronto, Ontario Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW)’s first project in Canada will consolidate many of Toronto’s smaller courts into a centrally-located municipal building next to the city’s Superior Court of Justice. The building is reminiscent of Piano’s work on the Jerome L. Greene Science Center for Columbia University, both in its boxy massing and in its open ground level, created by raising the base of the building several stories. Despite the courthouse’s wide-open atrium space, the building has been designed with security in mind, and cameras, baggage checkpoints, and internal security corridors will be deployed throughout. The first museum in Ontario to focus on the history of the indigenous justice system will also be located inside. Construction is on track to finish in 2022.
The HUB/30 Bay Street Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) Toronto, Ontario The recently-revealed design for The HUB, a 1.4 million-square-foot tower proposed for Toronto’s South Core neighborhood, is the result of an international design competition for a building that would have a major impact on Toronto’s skyline. The HUB will float over the adjacent Toronto Harbour Commission Building courtesy of a cantilevering base, and create what Senior Partner Graham Stirk describes as 'a harmony' between the two buildings. The use of external structural steel lends the tower a more industrial feeling, and RSHP is promising that the tower will contain column-free office space and a multi-story atrium as a result. Toronto’s Spadina Line expansion stations The Spadina Group Associates and All Design Toronto, Ontario Construction in Toronto is not limited to new towers. Humbler additions to public infrastructure have also been taking shape. Toronto’s largest subway extension in decades opened late last year with six new stations, including two colorful facilities from the late Will Alsop’s All Design. The boxy, zebra-striped second story of the Finch West Station cantilevers over the building's main entrance and is capped with an enormous red window at one end. A concrete 'skirt' floats around the station’s base and offers shelter to riders who are waiting for a bus outside. Inside, Alsop uses touches of color to lighten up the polished concrete interiors. For Pioneer Village, Alsop wrapped the cantilevering station in Corten steel. This station is much rounder than Finch West and uses a red band around the base of the building’s front to direct riders to the main entrance. A geometric canopy rises from the station’s back and creates a covered waiting area for the two regional bus lines that service the station. The same polished concrete seen at Finch West was used inside. Barclay Village Büro Ole Scheeren Vancouver, British Columbia Vancouver has also seen significant growth recently, including the Shigeru Ban-designed hybrid timber tower. Ole Scheeren’s recently-revealed twin towers sit in Vancouver’s West End neighborhood, and according to Scheeren, they use balconies, setbacks, and offsets to create a more welcoming face in contrast to the typical monolithic glass tower typology. All of the terraces are planted, and a rooftop plaza sits on top of the base that links the two towers. Scheeren claims that the driving concept for Barclay Village was to elevate the concept of the village skyward to match Vancouver’s overall verticality.
The Winnipeg Art Gallery’s Inuit Art Centre (IAC) Michael Maltzan Architecture Winnipeg, Manitoba This curvilinear four-story museum from Michael Maltzan broke ground in Winnipeg last month, and when complete in 2020, the building will become the largest Inuit art gallery in the world. A double-height glazed atrium at the museum’s base will be anchored by a central 'vault' protected by curved glass, and visitors can freely examine Inuit artifacts as they walk around the ground level. An 8,500-square-foot gallery on the third floor will display Inuit art. The sculptural facade of the building’s stone portion was reportedly inspired by the “immense, geographical features that form the background of many Inuit towns and inlets.” The IAC is an extension of the neighboring Winnipeg Art Gallery, and every floor with connect with the original building.