Posts tagged with "Tribeca":

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Four new spaces turn Tribeca into New York’s newest design destination

As the home of AN Interior's parent publication, The Architect's Newspaper, for 12 years, Manhattan’s Tribeca neighborhood has steadily developed a spicy, post-work hangout scene. The latest places to pop up in our community include four chic, inviting spaces that offer commuters and locals alike the chance to savor the sweet taste of good design (at a good price) any time of day. These stunning and simple venues—a timeless tea parlor, a cozy cocktail lounge, a sunny seafood spot, and a sky-high, Danny Meyer dining experience—all opened this year to rave reviews for their food, drinks, and decor. Next time you’re in Tribeca, you won’t want to forgo seeing these inspired interiors for yourself. Primo’s Designer: Camilla Deterre 129 Chambers Street Primo’s exudes a surprising and sexy contemporary twist on Italian Art Deco. Designed by model Camilla Deterre, the striking bar packs speakeasy sentimentality and midcentury modern elements into a small, two-room space hidden inside the Frederick Hotel. Long drapes with rich primary colors and cotton velvet upholstery covering curvaceous banquets give Primo’s an aura of luxury, but the soon-to-be late-night Tribeca mainstay is more informal than it appears. The chrome-outlined bar boasts an impressive organic wine collection and serves an array of dreamy classic cocktails and avant-garde absinthe coolers that will knock your socks off. Manhatta Architect: Woods Bagot 28 Liberty Street, 60th Floor As culinary impresario Danny Meyer’s most recent endeavor, Manhatta serves as a home in the sky for delicious food and jaw-dropping views. With less glitz than you’d expect from a restaurant of this stature—it nearly covers the entire top floor of Manhattan’s first International Style building—its elegant yet friendly atmosphere overwhelms any sense of high society. Woods Bagot’s design for the French-American eatery and bar brings dark wood, weathered granite, brass fixtures, and jewel-toned Chinese paintings together to subtly create an intimate setting with an unparalleled perspective of New York. A Summer Day Cafe Architect: Savvy Studio 109 West Broadway This relaxing restaurant and raw bar transports urbanites to Italy’s Amalfi Coast with an enticing seafood selection and a maritime mood. Dreamed up by architecture and branding studio Savvy, the 1,290-square-foot space oozes summer simplicity. It’s one of Tribeca restaurateur Matt Abramcyk’s latest ventures and an experiment in stylishly crafting the sensation of leisure and calm. The concept is a nod to photographer Joel Meyerowitz’s 1985 book A Summer’s Day, with a material palette inspired by boats, seaside cottages, and industrial fish markets.
Interlude Architect: Kimoy Studios 145 Hudson Street Founded by Juilliard-trained classical pianist Josh Kim, Interlude is an Asian tea and coffee cafe that serves its signature matcha tonic and homemade baked goods in a light-filled, minimalist space, designed by KIMOY Studios. Kim combined his passions for gastronomy, design, and hot drinks to open the business (which he runs with his sister and girlfriend) this summer. The bright white marble, polished black granite, and warm wood tones found throughout the cafe were hand-selected to mimic the look and feel of a grand piano.
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Introducing Herman Miller’s “street” sofa

Lispenard is Tribeca’s northernmost street, just parallel to and south of Canal Street a short block away. It’s only two blocks in length and the last one in Triburbia (or Tribeca, a neighborhood in transition on the lower west side of Manhattan) to be gentrified with fancy shops and expensive loft residences. It’s one of the few Manhattan streets that long-time cabbies have never heard of, but that is about to change. Not only is the street finally gentrifying, but it now has a line of beautiful furniture named after it. Herman Miller's Lispenard sofa line is designed by architect Neil Logan. The collection by Herman Miller is elegant and contemporary, befitting its Manhattan origins. Emphasizing balance and proportion, the stumpy round legs keep it real—offsetting the sleek, cushioned seating proportions—like the street: funky and a little grody. Looking back, I have lived on the street since the 1970s and have always appreciated the streets: narrow, dirty, and raffish. Images come to mind of the dilapidated marble and weathered brick buildings at Canal Street, so many that drew little attention from most at the time. What we now see as routine storefront and luxury residences, I lament as corroboration of the loss of the former Tribeca. Fortunately though, Miller’s Lispenard sofa line reads to me like a kind of tribute to that bygone era. Swathed in a rough-hewn upholstery, the collection comprises a club chair, three-seat sofa, sectional, and ottoman. I think it would look perfect in my polyurethaned oak floored loft, the place I have called home for nearly five decades. More so, I like to see the series not as an impediment to the character of the neighborhood, but actually as a part of the character of the neighborhood, only in a contemporary context.    
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A new exhibition asks: Are we living in digitally-rendered cities?

The show Rendered Cities, up at Apexart in Tribeca, addresses the problematic impact of architectural renderings on contemporary architecture. The show’s opening statement asserts that flashy renderings make cityscapes "real before reality," with newly constructed buildings mimicking digitally rendered drawings. Because architecture today originates from a computer drawing, built structures are becoming more and more dictated by digital renderings, leaving space for technology to be more deeply embedded into our surroundings.

The notion that architectural renderings create a fixed idea of what a city should look like is especially relevant to the present day, when cities seem more like construction sites than living spaces, and glass skyscrapers are rising in global cities around the world.

Featuring work by Felicity Hammond, Lawrence Lek, and Laura Yuile, the show is organized by London's ANGL Collective, a curatorial group comprised of Luís Manuel Araújo, Brenda Guesnet, and Giulia Pistone. The three met in the MFA Curating program at Goldsmiths College in London, and they now put together shows that deal with architecture through ‘fiction and imagination.’ Hammond’s piece consists of a bright green wall and floor installation within which abstract geometric shapes are installed on wooden scaffolds or attached directly to the wall and floor. Her work resembles the world inside of a computer screen—a space with fractured shapes, voids of color, and nothing to orient one's surroundings that blurs the line between real usable space and abstract computer space.

Lawrence Lek’s video essay uses footage from the game Assassin’s Creed to move through various cities. For example, the game's character scales Notre Dame in Paris and Egyptian pyramids, allowing a new and physically impossible perspective for the viewer. Rendered Cities notes that Lek’s work traces “the political symbolism of the skyscraper as the global repetition of an urban form and a contemporary manifestation of wealth and power.” It is an example of technology allowing humans to experience space in an enhanced way, allowing for commentary on real places by using digitally rendered ones.

Yuile’s work includes an installation and a performance piece scheduled for February 10. The work present at the opening was comprised of three mannequins and a washing machine that had been taken apart and added onto. Yuile’s installation will come to life during a performance piece, Laura Yuile Performance of Unit #1, Maintenance #1. The artist described some of her materials for the piece on her Instagram: “[washing] machine, soap, mannequins; clothing fibers, including human and animal hair and skin cells, plant fibers, and pollen, dust, and microorganisms from my neighbors clothing...” This variety of materials reflects the artist’s voice on familial structures, ways of living, and the effects of advertising.

Rendered Cities is on view at Apexart through March 17. Laura Yuile’s performance piece will take place on Saturday, February 10, 2018, from 3:00–4:00 pm. More information on this show can be found here.  

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Artist Daniel Buren transforms Tribeca gallery with mesmerizing installation

There is a mesmerizing new interior in Tribeca that architects and designers should rush to see before it is taken down on June 24. Created by artist Daniel Buren for the new Bortolami gallery at 39 Walker Street, it's titled To Align: works in situ 2017. Buren has spent 50 years transforming all sorts of interior and exterior spaces with his signature contrasting stripes motif, but if you are familiar with his earlier work, like the Palais Royal installation in Paris, you are aware of his blue and white stripes and will be surprised by the colorful turn his work has taken in the last few years. Installed in the Bortolami space, To Align: works in situ 2017 uses white and brightly colored alternating stripes of red, blue, yellow, and black-and-white exactly 8.7 cm. in width, as derived from the fabric he first used as a canvas in 1965. The stripes are spatially oriented on the sides of 44 rectangular columns so that from different perspectives one is engulfed by entirely different palates of color. These color fields both react to the existing cast iron architecture and challenge its ‘spaciousness.’ The 44 tightly-packed columns in the space create a magical forest of color while challenging its ‘galleriness’ and, with the gallery’s back skylights covered with colored film, the space is in daytime even more memorable. Buren’s signature vertical stripes wrap around Bortolami’s exterior Corinthian columns, where they will remain until 2021.
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Historic Tribeca warehouse meets its match

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This new 33-unit condominium in New York’s historic Tribeca neighborhood is composed of two buildings, a restored and converted 1905 coffee and tea warehouse on Washington Street and a matching addition on Greenwich Street. The new building produces a “double negative” effect, with identical facade detailing rendered in a matte metallic finish.
  • Facade Manufacturer Ferra Designs (base); Stromberg Architectural Products (middle); LITSCO (top)
  • Architects Morris Adjmi Architects
  • Facade Installer Mistral Architectural Metal (base); GEM (middle); GEM/LITSCO (top)
  • Facade Consultants Frank Seta Associates
  • Location New York City, NY
  • Date of Completion 2016
  • System Rainscreen
  • Products custom CNC-milled aluminum panel in a plasma finish; modular cast GFRC panels; zinc
Wesley Wolfe, director of design at New York City–based Morris Adjmi Architects, said this concept of the direct copy was influenced by both contextual and cultural factors. "Warehouses in the district often were extended as their needs for more space grew. These additions would often mimic the style of the original warehouse." Wolfe said the use of analogous materials is not uncommon, citing the tendency of industrial-era cast iron to replicate stone or brick. The project was also inspired by art and the idea of duplication in the work of pop artists like Andy Warhol. The project team used a combination of laser scanning and hand measurement to capture details in the base, middle, and top of the historic masonry facade. The base of the facade mimics it's neighboring limestone masonry, employing a marine grade aluminum panel with CNC-milled patterns. The material is finished with a plasma flame spray involving a mixture of nickel and stainless steel powder. The cost of this premium material and finish limited its use to the ground floor of the building where it's exposure is maximized to passersby. The upper floors employ a glass fiber reinforced concrete (GFRC) panel with spray on coating with aluminum particles that mimics the look of the plasma finish of the metal panels. The custom cast panels are installed onto the facade as a rain screen assembly using a standard clip and Z-girt system backing up to a stud wall. The facade is panelized with a "modular rationality" coordinated with the composition of the punched windows of the facade. An overlapping tongue detail developed by the project team helps to minimize panel joints. Beyond the facade, a landscaped courtyard cut into the two buildings helps to connect the old with the new. The interior aesthetic parallels the two structures as well, offering rustic exposed finishes in the original warehouse and a more contemporary streamlined finish for the new addition.
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Maya Lin seeks design approval for a 20,000-square-foot mansion in Tribeca

A five-story, 20,000-square-foot mansion designed by Maya Lin and others would rise on a prominent corner in Tribeca, if New York’s Landmarks Preservation Commission approves the project. Lin, the founder of Maya Lin Studio, and collaborator William Bialosky of Bialosky + Partners Architects, are expected to meet with the preservation commission this month as part of their application for construction approval. The mansion would rise at 11 Hubert Street, at Collister Street, in Tribeca. The property is currently occupied by a three story building that dates from the 1980s, with commercial space at ground level and apartments above. A six story warehouse occupied the site before World War II. According to materials presented to the preservation commission and community representatives, Lin and Bialosky propose to add two stories to the existing building and fill in a void above the first level on the Hubert Street side. The resulting residence would rise about 70 feet, matching the height of the adjacent building on Hubert. The exterior would be clad in brick, stone, coated stainless steel, perforated metal, and both clear and fritted glass. The design has been likened to a building within a building, in that it has the scale of the warehouse building that was on the site but its window proportions recall residential buildings of a smaller scale. According to the design team’s submittal, “the articulation of windows with metal frames creates a layering and detailing that refers back to masonry and cast iron buildings” in the area, and the scale “preserves the proportional relationships with the neighboring historic buildings.” The designers also note that “there is precedent for contemporary buildings in historic districts” and show examples of midblock and corner buildings in SoHo, the West Village, Tribeca, and the Upper East Side. They also show an example of a corner building with a glass façade in a historic district. According to the Tribeca Trib Online, the mansion’s estimated cost is $15 million to $16 million and plans call for five bedrooms, 11 bathrooms, a dog room, separate prep and catering kitchens, a wine closet, two bars, a screening room, his and her studies, a landscaped courtyard, a 5,000 square foot sports and fitness center in the basement, a garage, and a rooftop garden with solar panels. The building’s client has not been identified. Also according to the Tribeca Trib, the design received approval in May from the Tribeca Committee of Community Board 1, which is advisory to the Landmarks Preservation Commission. The LPC meeting is scheduled for June 21.
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Rush hour construction crane collapse in Tribeca injures two, kills one

During the height of rush hour this morning, a construction crane collapsed on Worth Street between Church Street and West Broadway in Tribeca, mere blocks from AN's New York headquarters. One person is dead and three others are injured in a collapse that occurred around 8:25 AM, the FDNY reports. The collapsed crane also damaged surrounding buildings and crushed cars parked on the street. As firefighters, police, and personnel from the NYC Office of Emergency Management (OEM) assess the scene, there is no 1 train service at Franklin and Chambers streets until further notice. The OEM notes that there will be significant gridlock surrounding the affected block.     https://twitter.com/FDNY/status/695622838988963840   Sadly, the accident today is not the first New York crane collapse in recent memory. Bay Crane, the Queens–based company that owns the crane, was also implicated in a 2015 crane collapse that injured ten people in Midtown, The New York Post reports. New York Crane and Equipment Corporation's crane collapsed on a Long Island City job in 2013, injuring seven.
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Post-Office Architectes puts its stamp on Tribeca with a luxury takeover on Church Street

Block by block, the line of demarcation between "prime Tribeca" and Tribeca is slowly creeping south. New York– and Paris-based Post-Office Architectes recently unveiled a 12 story, 23 unit luxury residential building at 30 Warren Street. Last October, AN reported on 30 Warren's neighbor, 12 Warren, a DDG-designed residential building less than a block away. While 12 Warren's bluestone-clad facade sets it apart from neighboring buildings, 30 Warren asserts itself with a full block takeover of Church Street, between Warren and Chambers streets. Along the block's busy streetwall, the development includes approximately 9,700 square feet of ground floor retail. "The design of 30 Warren is purposely asymmetrical arranging for an intentional void, staggered floors on the west side, and a southern facade with two setbacks to take full advantage of the views of the Manhattan skyline, the skyscrapers in the Financial District and the river," explained Post-Office Architectes principal Francois Leininger in a statement. "We focused on framing the amazing views and arranged a sequence of large picture windows to capture the grand moments of the city. The framed views were determined from the interior of the units as a way of bringing the city into the residences without overexposing its occupants." Most of the picture windows are single pane, including the 13-foot-long living room window in each unit. To minimize noise, windows on the Chambers Street side are triple-glazed, the New York Times reports. The exterior walls will be coated with reinforced, one-inch-thick concrete, giving the building a semi-industrial feel that dialogues with its grittier neighbors. The one- t0 three-bedroom units range in size from 1,000 to 2,500 square feet. There is not one, but three, floor-through penthouses. (The physics of luxury development defy comprehension.) 30 Warren is expected to be complete by fall 2017.
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Eavesdrop> The BIG in Big Apple: Rumors say Bjarke Ingels planning several more New York City towers

Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is off the rails lately, netting commission after commission. Five years ago, BIG set up shop stateside to supervise W57, the "courtscraper" along the West Side Highway—the firm's first New York City project. They have since collected an impressive portfolio of planned projects, and AN hears there's more on the way. It is almost unreal to hear rumors about another possible tower in Tribeca, a second westside project near the High Line, and an Upper East Side supertall tower in the pipeline. BIG could have seven large projects that would come to fruition in the next decade or so. Talk about a BIG Apple! W57, meanwhile, is well under construction. At 126th Street, BIG's project in Harlem (now in design development) would cantilever over Gotham Plaza on 125th Street. The building allegedly contains mostly studios and one-bedrooms, and there are approximately 233 total units—47 of these will be affordable. The project formerly known as the Dryline or "BIG U" is being implemented, with modifications, as the East Side Coastal Resiliency Project (ESCRP). BIG U called for ten unbroken miles of flood protection in Manhattan, from West 57th Street, looping south to the Battery and up the East River to 42nd Street. When AN checked in on the project this October, BIG U was scaled back due to funding constraints. The $335 million ESCRP will create retractable flood barriers, berms, and floodwalls in the East River from Montgomery Street to East 23rd Street. Construction is slated to begin in 2017. BIG was one of the last starchitecture firms to get a High Line commission. Good things come to those who wait: the two tower HZF High Line project, at Eleventh Avenue and 17th Street, feature 300 apartments (most with two and three bedrooms), 50,00 square feet of ground floor retail, and a three-level, 150,000-square-foot hotel. The 38 story (402 feet) western tower will its 28 story (302 feet) sibling tower to the east. The towers are expected to be complete by 2018. The stepped, 1,340-foot-tall Two World Trade Center is in design development. When it opens in 2020, it will make a dramatic impact on the skyline from all angles. If King Kong decides to terrorize Manhattan again, he'll have the perfect building to climb.
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12 Warren Condominiums starts to reveal its final form

Tribeca's 12 Warren Condominiums (formerly 12 Warren Street) is finally stripping down with the public now getting a glimpse of the building's distinguished facade. Development and design firm DDG is bucking the trend of the usual glass luxury building that are commonplace all over Manhattan, instead opting for the naturalistic texture of rough stone. A short while ago, AN reported that the DDG building at 12 Warren St. sat "shrouded in canvas-covered scaffolding" with the design hidden from the eyes of the public. Teasing renderings were leaking out, but now we know more as the structure's shroud is peeling away. As the first pieces of scaffolding are removed, the unique bluestone facade, punctuated with a mix of textures and forms, is slowly being revealed. DDG told AN  that the scaffolding will be fully removed within two weeks, with the facade being able to be viewed in all its glory. For now, here's your first glimpse at the structure's unique facade. The stone, which is the dominant feature on facade, is locally sourced from a bluestone quarry in upstate New York. This is not the first time DDG has employed the material throughout one of their buildings. The material can also be seen in action at the already complete DDG project on 41 Bond Street in Noho, a couple miles north. In addition to this the facade, the building will also incorporate exposed brick masonry and board-formed concrete detailing. DDG is aiming for LEED certification on the project. The 13-story structure will have extensive full-floor duplex and triplex dwellings, many of which will offer private outdoor space and direct elevator entry. Occupancy is expected to begin in early 2016
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New York City launches interactive maps that reveal the minutia of neighborhood-level data

Busybodies and neighborhood know-it-alls rejoice: today, New York City, in partnership with civic data managers Vizalytics, launched a beta version of neighborhood.nyc, a new website that maps street-level information derived from 311 calls and city agencies. While this information was and is available in the NYC Open Data Portal, it often required time and high-level sleuthing to sort through mounds of data. The city's new website, neighborhood.nyc, pulls from open data feeds to streamline and map information in the data portal, allowing residents to filter results by neighborhood, or categories, including: MTA, traffic, public health, and quality of life. A search of Tribeca (AN's home neighborhood) revealed markers for noise complaints, street closures, restaurant inspection reports, and contact information for police, fire, and elected officials. In the coming months, the city will invite community leaders to become page administrators, allowing them update their neighborhood's home page images, post community events, or promote local business. To ensure broad access, the site is available in 13 languages. Each neighborhood has its own searchable URL. The index lists over 400 districts famous and obscure, including the twee portmanteaus that are definitely not a thing.
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DDG brings dramatic mountain terrain to its Tribeca condo conversion

DDG, the architecture and development shop in New York City, is known for using natural materials and dressing its buildings with greenery. This has been the case at a slew of its high-end residential projects around the city, such as 41 Bond or 345 Meatpacking. The firm’s latest residential building at 12 Warren Street in Tribeca continues in that tradition—and then some. NY YIMBY got its hands on new renderings of the firm's 12 Warren project, one of which shows off its very dramatic bluestone facade. To further emphasize the building's natural vibe, greenery is planted across the exterior. Classic DDG. The bluestone continues inside the project's condo units which are finished with a mix of natural elements. YIMBY noted that the project is actually a renovation and addition on top of an existing structure that will more than double in size to 12 stories. For now, the construction site sits shrouded in canvas-covered scaffolding, keeping the design hidden from public view. At the street level, DDG is displaying photographs of natural areas where building materials were gathered.The building is expected to be completed in Spring 2016.