Posts tagged with "SmithGroupJJR":

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Ennead to transform its Newseum building for Johns Hopkins University

Ennead Architects, the New York-based firm formerly known as Polshek Partnership, will team up with SmithGroup to redevelop the Newseum building in Washington, D.C. for Johns Hopkins University. The Baltimore-based university announced its plans to purchase the building from the nonprofit Freedom Forum earlier this year for $372.5 million. Johns Hopkins will consolidate its existing real estate holdings in the city at the new offshoot building on Pennsylvania Avenue, which will host various academic and administrative initiatives.

Ennead is an appropriate choice to head the project for obvious reasons. Led by architect James Polshek, the firm designed the current Newseum building before changing its name from Polshek Partnership in 2010. Opened in 2008, the building has several distinct features, including a 75-foot-tall marble slab engraved with an excerpt from the First Amendment. A so-called “window on the world” also occupies the structure’s Pennsylvania Avenue frontage, allowing for views between the street, the National Mall, and visitors inside the museum. Ennead has handled multiple high-profile museum projects around the world, such as the Rose Center for Earth and Space at New York’s American Museum of Natural History and the Clinton Presidential Center in Little Rock, Arkansas.

Ennead submitted initial drawings for the major remodeling to the U.S. Commission on Fine Arts (CFA) on July 3. Before construction can begin, the commission must provide informal feedback and officially approve of the final design. The filing sent to the CFA indicates that certain aspects of the building’s facade will change. The marble tablet with the excerpt from the Constitution, as well as the newspaper headlines that line the avenue, will be removed. The entrance will be reimagined as more transparent and open. Due to boundary line regulations on Pennsylvania Avenue, though, much of the structure’s original massing will remain in place.

The interior will undergo a significant transformation as well. The university has announced plans to reconfigure floor slabs and circulation within the building—currently, much of the museum is positioned around a large, multistory central void. With more than 400,000 square feet of floor space available inside, the facility will house classrooms, offices, and event spaces that will be open to the public. No plans for alterations to the 135-unit Newseum Residences have been released.

As for the Newseum itself, administrators at Freedom Forum have not yet announced where the museum will move. After years of serious budget deficits, the institution will close temporarily at the end of 2019. Employees will work out of a provisional office in Washington until a new home is found. Hopkins has suggested that construction on its facility could begin as early as 2020, and as late as 2023, with no estimated completion date.

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First-ever Detroit City of Design Competition brings kinetic energy generators and a nap room

Detroit is known as the birthplace of Motown and techno, lauded for its thick pizzas and Coney dogs, and scrutinized as a decadent example of urbanism under late capitalism. For better or worse, the city and its reputation fascinates city-fixers, attracts artists, and galvanizes community action. Some Detroiters hope to spin a different kind of change with the first-ever Detroit City of Design Competition, an event that will bring three winning installations to select city neighborhoods. Designers from the 31 UNESCO Cities of Design, a designation bestowed by the United Nations' UNESCO on urban areas with distinctive design cultures, were asked by neighborhood organization to design "solutions" (a loaded mandate) to boost safety and walkability in Hope Village, Southwest Detroit, and Grandmont Rosedale. A jury of locals, city officials, and designers from elsewhere chose installations from Detroit's SmithGroup; Detroit's Other Work, and Montreal's Collectif Escargo. Design Core Detroit, an organization that promotes design as economic development, spearheaded the competition. The John S. and James L. Knight Foundation contributed funding for the initiative. "Urban spaces have a tendency to become hard and cold if left unattended," said Caitlin Marcon, deputy director of Complete Streets at the Detroit Department of Public Works, in a press release. "Durable materials that meet our need for longevity sometimes do not spark our desires for beauty. These prototypes harness the creative and softer qualities we seek while being functional for street life and gathering." The projects will debut in September during the Detroit Month of Design and will be relocated to their chosen neighborhoods in April 2020. Each winner received $20,000 to design and build their prototype. Take a look at the images below to learn more about the selected designs. All quotes are designers' statements from the media release: Cyclerate SmithGroup Hope Village "Cyclerate aims to enhance public safety through unity, lighting, communication, and play. The installation, which lights up using kinetic energy generated by hand-powered cranks and stationary bike generators, encourages the community to work together to illuminate the structure. Participants can also engage in a friendly competition with one another to identify who can produce the greatest power output on the cycles. Expect to be surprised by the power produced through real-time statistics. The installation currently features LED lighting, Bluetooth speakers, and USB power charging stations. With its built-in expansion capability, the scalable structure can accommodate additional cycles, componentry, and lighting." Garden Novella Other Work Southwest Detroit "Garden Novella is a platform to express cultural, collective, and individual identity. It weaves together recorded stories from Southwest residents to serve as a guide through a modular system of welcoming vessels. Sun-powered lanterns, hanging gardens, seating, and the recorded stories combine to create an interactive environment. The featured stories express the double consciousness experienced by many in the Southwest community; they aim to connect generations, repair the damage caused by repatriation and explore the process of translation in a bilingual community." 3Rooms Collectif Escargo Grandmont Rosedale
"3Rooms consists of three spaces that are intimately linked to the world of the house—simultaneously conveying a sense of belonging and celebrating the beauty of united communities. The first 'room' is 'LeJardin' (The Garden), where the community is invited to participate in agriculture. 'Le Boudoir' is for nap lovers, readers and anyone who desires [siq] a rest in the shade of fruit trees. Finally, 'The Hut' features a steeper incline, making it a perfect spot for anyone who wants to be a little more playful. Each module lights up in the evening with a soft glow, functioning as a fireplace in the middle of the neighborhood. The hue alternates from red, blue, mauve or multicolored. 3Rooms is a safe cocoon for improvised gatherings. Like a poetic metaphor of the surrounding houses, it is merry, bright, colorful and full of life."
In a statement, Olga Stella, executive director of Detroit Design Core, noted the project's potential impact: "We are inspired by the innovation presented in the winners and finalists and the way they demonstrate the value of design to the community. We hope these installations will peak [siq] the interest of private and public groups to commission the winning design teams to create permanent fixtures in these and other neighborhoods.”
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San Francisco’s public toilets get a futuristic redesign

San Francisco is one step closer to finalizing the redesign of its public, self-cleaning toilets.  On Monday, the city selected a futuristic design concept created by SmithGroupJJR from a trio proposals that included bids by Min Design and Branch Creative. The three finalists were unveiled in April, with SmithGroupJJR ultimately selected in an effort to boost the contemporary stylings of the city’s public facilities, according to the San Francisco Department of Public Works. Initially, 12 teams were in the running for the design competition.  The public toilets will operated by bus stop advertising agency JCDecaux and will be funded via income generated from informational and retail kiosks that will be deployed in conjunction with the toilets.  Bill Katz, design principal at SmithGroupJJR, told The San Francisco Chronicle, “The big idea is to combine sculpture and technology. We want an object that literally reflects the surroundings and the neighborhoods that it is in, but also will be forward-looking.” The changes come more than 20 years after San Francisco debuted an initial, Art Nouveaux-inspired public toilet concept in 1996 that has been loved and hated alike by the public. The forest green-colored, pill-shaped facilities are currently dispersed throughout San Francisco’s urban core and are also used in Los Angeles, among other localities. In all, the city aims to install or replace 28 public toilets and 114 kiosks in conjunction with the redesign.  The proposed bathroom facilities will make use of recycled water and are wrapped in reflective metal panels. Current plans call for topping the structures with a rooftop garden. Renderings for the concept include an integrated bench assembly and a ground-level planter, as well.  The new proposals, however, are not uniformly loved, either. Darcy Brown, executive director of the San Francisco Beautiful group, told The Chronicle, [It’s a] “pity we lean toward ‘modern,’ which has a shelf life, as opposed to classic, which is timeless.” San Francisco Beautiful opposed all three of the redesign concepts.  Next, SmithGroupJJR’s proposal will next head to the San Francisco Arts Commission and the Historic Preservation Commission for joint approval. Approval is expected in the fall.
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Museum of the Bible opens near National Mall in Washington, D.C.

The Museum of the Bible opened last week in a new home designed by Washington, D.C.–based SmithGroupJJR. The museum occupies a renovated 1922 former refrigerated warehouse that later served as Washington’s Design Center, and will comprise a large glass addition meant to evoke an ancient boat (or perhaps ark) floating above the city. In a prepared statement, the designers call it “a palimpsest: the built equivalent of a manuscript that bears traces of several versions of text added and erased over time.” At the main entrance of the eight-level, 430,000-square-foot building, a tall, narrow opening originally used for trains has been restored and is flanked by two large bronze panels inspired by typesetting blocks from the original Gutenberg Bible. It refers to one of the main curatorial concepts of the museum: that the meaning and interpretation of the Bible are historically dependent on its means of production and dissemination. The designers removed several floor slabs added during an earlier renovation to open up the industrial cargo area into a tall atrium that, the designers say, suggests the nave of a Gothic or Renaissance church. The circulation paths are arranged in a vertical hub-and-spoke model that allows visitors to choose their own adventure, rather than make their way along a fixed vertical path as is the case in many multi-level museums, especially those on tight urban sites. The hall now serves as both an orientation and gathering place, while also providing access to the adjacent museum shop and the cafe on a mezzanine above. The new construction sits atop the original industrial brick structure. In the exhibition spaces, removable raised flooring gives curators flexibility, while “digital docents” will be available as either a priest or a rabbi. The museum also includes 12 theatres, a 475-seat performing arts venue, conference amenities, biblical garden, rare manuscript library, a 450-seat ballroom, spaces for scholarly research, and hotel rooms for visiting scholars. The museum will be visible from the National Mall when looking down 4th Street, and it hovers above an existing Metro train line and also adds to an axis along 4th Street that includes the National Building Museum, the National Gallery of Art, the National Museum of the American Indian, and the National Air & Space Museum. The museum opened to the public last Friday, November 17.
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The Wharf, D.C.'s massive waterfront development, is now open

The Wharf–a $2 billion new development on a former industrial stretch of the D.C. waterfront–has finally opened. The developers are Madison Marquette and PN Hoffman, and the master architect and planner is Perkins Eastman. Previously the site was a mile-long stretch of boat storage, industrial space, and some back-door barbecue joints. At its northern end, it also includes the oldest fish market in the United States. Before the Wharf could be built, the existing seawall and promenade were torn up and replaced by an underground, two-story parking garage spanning the length of the development. The garages connect from below into an array of luxury residential structures with ground-level commercial space–restaurants, yoga studios, and other amenities. Last week all of these opened to the public–in total, 1.2 million square feet of mixed-use space including office structures, luxury and affordable residential space, a marina, and waterfront parks. The fish market was the only structure preserved as-is. The Anthem, a new 6,000-person theatre venue, is a cornerstone development of the Wharf. Designed by New York-based Rockwell Group, the venue is essentially a concrete volume hedged in by two L-shaped residential structures. The Anthem has a warehouse-like interior and two levels of balconies split into smaller, drawer-like extrusions. Massive steel panels flank the stage, laser cut and illuminated with the pattern of two enormous curtains drawn back, resembling the velvet drapery of Baroque theaters. The space is managed by a 30-year old staple organization in D.C. entertainment–the 9:30 Club–to whom the Wharf reached out in the initial stages. The building’s board-form concrete paneling and industrial facade are intended as a nod to the Club’s famed punk-laden lineups. In the lobby, one can look up through an installation of floating cymbals to four rectangular skylights three floors up. If you look closely, the skylights ripple with water–the underbelly of a pool for a residential structure stacked above. A key design challenge for the Anthem was its siting between two residential structures. To address the noise issue, Rockwell spent several million dollars designing a multi-layered sound barrier between the structures, which are reportedly so effective that amplified concerts are inaudible from the interiors of apartments less than a hundred feet away. Supposedly, a resident could sleep soundly while Dave Grohl shredded away on opening night. The Anthem's neighboring structures include designs by FOX Architects, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Perkins Eastman, Parcel 3A, Cunningham Quill Architects, BBG_BBGM, Handel Architects, WDG Architecture, Studio MB, SmithGroup JJR, MTFA Architecture, SK&I, and Moffatt & Nichol. Only Phase One has opened. Phase Two will add an additional 1.2 million square feet to the overall site footprint, mostly extending south. The roster of new structures will include designs by firms such as SHoP Architects, Rafael Viñoly, Morris Adjmi Architects, Hollwich Kushner (HWKN), ODA, WDG Architecture, and Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates (MVVA). The expansion will include increased office and residential space, an additional pier and marina, as well as increased park space. Phase One is notably without much public greenery. The construction of Phase Two is slated to begin in 2018, with a projected opening of 2021.
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Five proposals highlight potential for a new park in Milwaukee's Inner Harbor

Five teams are vying for a chance to design a small park in Milwaukee’s evolving Inner Harbor. The small two-lot site is just a small portion of the nearly 1,000 acres of waterfront which the city hopes to eventually transform. The Take Me to the River competition, initiated by the non-profit Harbor District, Inc., is the latest push to raise public interest in the mostly post-industrial landscape. Milwaukee’s harbor is still a working harbor but much of it is unused. Vast tracts of the land surrounding the harbor are either filled with abandoned industrial buildings or are contaminated brownfields. In recent years, some these structures have begun to be dismantled and the land remediated. One of the most significant additions to the area is the University of Wisconsin School of Freshwater Sciences, a leading research facility in the Great Lakes. Recently teams of architects—including Chicago-based Studio Gang, Toronto-based DTAH, Vancouver-based PWL, and Denver-based Wenk—weighed in on the harbor as part of a Harbor District-led design charrette. Though that charrette was not intended to produce buildable proposals, this latest competition does hope to create new public space for the area. The small site for the Take Me to the River competition is situated at the intersection of Greenfield Avenue and the Kinnickinnic River. Each of the five teams participating provided proposals that range from an extensive reshaping of the shoreline to interactive designs. The participating teams and their projects include:
  • SmithGroupJJR and TKWA UrbanLab – Welcome to the River
  • MKExTEN (Vetter Denk Architects, Ten X Ten, and Design Fugitives) – Urban Flashlights
  • La Dallman Architects and Alfred Benesch Engineering – Waterlily Landing
  • Quorum Architects and Ayres Associates – Slosh Park
  • UWM Inner Harbor Team (UWM, City as a Living Laboratory, Creative Lighting Design, SEH) – Access/Engagement/Education
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Richmond, Virginia to build memorial on former site of the country's largest slave prison

200 years ago, Richmond, Virginia, was home to the largest slave penitentiary in the United States: Lumpkin's Jail. The slave holding facility, also known at the time as “the Devil’s half acre,” held the title for more than twenty years and was a hub for the country's slave trade. Two centuries on, and after much deliberation, Richmond has decided to move forward with plans memorialize the site where many slaves were once held and lost their lives. In doing so, authorities have recruited the architecture firm SmithGroupJJR. The Detroit-based practice recently worked on David Adjaye's much celebrated National Museum of African American History and Culture in Washington D.C., being named as "associate design/construction architect." The decision was made by Richmond’s Slave Trail Commission who said they are now ready to lay down some plans. The move has been a long time coming. An emotional Delegate Dolores McQuinn, a Democrat from Richmond, spoke to WVTF Radio. “You know you dream, you pray, you seek direction, input, help, and it’s just phenomenal to be at this place now," she said. News of the plans, however, has not been well received by everyone. Aside from the city's steps to memorialize the site, a large grassroots movement has been running too—though the two haven't always shared the same view. According to WVTF, criticism has fallen on the city for not including a nearby African burial ground in the memorial. Ana Edwards, a leading figure of the grassroots movement, spoke positively of the news. "This is a very good first step, and it is a logical first step," she said. "Our primary goal is that they protect the rest of the footprint, so that it will be there when the funds are available for that development to take place." While SmithGroupJJR has joined the project, whether the site becomes a memorial and/or museum remains to be determined. This project also comes on the heels of a new museum and a memorial to the victims of lynching in Montgomery, Alabama, set to open in 2017.
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Freelon Adjaye Bond / Smithgroup's Crowning Achievement on the National Mall

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The Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC), scheduled to open to the public tomorrow, is capping off a nearly decade-long highly publicized planning and construction process. The 400,000-square-foot building is notable for securing the last developable site on the National Mall, and will be the nation’s primary home for exhibiting and celebrating African-American achievements in art, history, and culture. While 60 percent of the structure sits below grade, the remaining 40 percent rises 85 feet above grade and is wrapped in an arresting daylight-filtering screen referred to as a corona. The three-tiered, inverted form merges African and American historical references, drawing from Yoruban caryatids and the Washington Monument. The corona’s pattern was developed by digitizing traditional shapes the team found in historic ornate ironwork from Charleston and New Orleans. The project is the result of a collaboration among Adjaye Associates, who functioned as the lead designer, Freelon Group (now Perkins+Will), who covered the interior design scope above grade, Davis Brody Bond, who covered the interior design scope below grade, and SmithGroupJJR, who was responsible for the entire enclosure of the building from the foundations to the roof, and from curb to curb. With four architects and numerous consultant teams on board, the NMAAHC’s design process was fast and highly collaborative. The client and representatives of each of the firms attended workshops and presentations at project milestones. Work on the facade design process proceeded with a smaller team coordinated by Adjaye Associates, who held regular meetings at its New York City office. For federally funded projects, three initial concepts must be presented before narrowing down to one final scheme. Only 14 months was allotted for the time between a final concept submissions to the delivery of bid documents. Areta Pawlynsky, partner at Heintges & Associates, the consulting firm for facade engineering, said this timeframe was pressing, but ultimately benefitted the project: "This was incredibly demanding, but in a way, easier to keep the momentum going to work through all of these design decisions.” Throughout this process, Pawlynsky said, adhering to the competition-winning design vision was what drove the design development process. "The most challenging part of the project was making sure the facades remained true to the competition." She continued, "When we look back at the competition entry images and the verbal description, we are very proud the building's envelope was able to remain true throughout its development. That doesn't always happen."
  • Facade Contractor Enclos / Northstar
  • Architects Freelon Adjaye Bond / Smithgroup (The Freelon Group, Adjaye Associates, Davis Brody Bond, SmithGroup JJR)
  • Construction Manager Clark / Smoot / Russell, a joint venture
  • Facade Consultants Heintges & Associates; Guy Nordenson & Associates with Robert Silman Associates (structural engineering); Fisher Marantz Stone (lighting consultant); WSP Flack & Kurtz (Mechanical Engineer)
  • Location Washington, D.C.
  • Date of Completion 2016
  • Facade Construction Systems Hung AESS truss and framing system with structurally glazed curtain wall units installed onto AESS from interior (corona framing & enclosure); cast aluminum with custom artisan 5 coat PVDF coated panels on AESS carrier frames (corona screen); bent laminated glass clerestory (oculous); Metal panel rainscreen; Various other structurally glazed curtain walls
With full height atriums on each of the museum’s four sides, the exterior envelope was conceptualized as an “inside-out” assembly, providing clear spans of glass to the interior. Guy Nordenson & Associates developed the primary structural system—a series of three horizontal trusses that wrap the building, giving the facade its signature tiered form. Construction detailing of the envelope was carried out through a design assist package awarded to a joint venture between Enclos and Northstar, who developed a cost-saving strategy to integrate vertical trusses within the curtain wall assembly. Heintges & Associates then engineered and developed technical options for systems that attached to this structure, including the screen panels and unitized glass panels. Adjaye Associates’ decorative screen pattern was digitally manipulated—scaling up and down to produce four densities ranging from 65 to 95 percent opacity in response to key views of the surrounding monuments, and to solar orientation. Selective openings in the corona screen provide “lenses” looking outward to key views of the Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial, Jefferson Memorial, White House, and U.S. Capitol. The material selection process for the corona screen began with solid cast bronze, which was deemed too heavy with a variation that—over time—would cause undesirable performative and maintenance issues. The design team settled on a cast aluminum due to the material’s track record as a reliable cladding. A unique five-coat application of PVDF produced variation and depth to the bronze coloration of the panels. The corona screen was assembled on-site from shop-fabricated steel plate carrier frames containing 13 cast aluminum panels each. A staggered paneling running across the facade required selective panels to be installed in the field. These “stitch panels” bridge the gaps between adjacent carrier frames, helping to conceal any visual clues to the pre-fabricated frame assembly. The design team consulted with Fisher Marantz Stone on a subtle lighting scheme to incorporate backlit panels that bounce light off frit glazed walls to produce a glowing facade at night. These details and lighting effects were scrutinized through numerous design studies and mockups, and by regulatory agencies to ensure the lighting of monuments at night would remain balanced. Hal Davis, senior vice president at SmithGroupJJR, said the building envelope design was “quite unusual.” Asked if there were any technical challenges associated with designing a curtainwall system with an inside-out weather line, Davis replied, “of course!” He explained that an off-the-shelf-system couldn’t simply be installed backward: "It’s a different approach and it did take quite a bit of effort. We worked with Enclos and Heinges and David Adjaye to get it right and to make sure we were going to maintain the integrity of the design, the tightness and the insulation quality of the system, preventing condensation. For this, we had to develop very subtle heating elements that would eliminate moisture.” Pawlynsky concluded, "I think the real story of success here is the collaboration, including the contractors, Enclos and Northstar, and CM Clark. There was a strong commitment to executing this facade in the appropriate way, and it extended across the board."
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Ford Motor Company has begun a $1.2 billion makeover for its campus in Dearborn, Michigan

When Ford Motor Company took stock of its current 60-year-old Dearborn, Michigan, facilities, it became clear that the only way forward would be to take a big leap into two new high-tech campuses. Spearheading the master plans is the Detroit office of SmithGroupJJR. When completed, the estimated $1.2 billon, ten-year project will involve moving 30,000 employees from 70 buildings into a Product Campus and a Headquarters Campus. Throughout the project, the entire campus will also have to stay 100 percent operational.

One of Ford’s primary goals will be to improve the health and well-being of its employees. To do so, SmithGroupJJR has incorporated the seven concepts of the WELL Building Standard, a matrix that addresses air, water, nourishment, light, fitness, comfort, and mental and emotional health of employees. The 7.5 million square feet of new and remodeled workspace will include ample natural light, diverse workstation configurations, social hubs, and various sizes of collaborative workspaces. These workspaces will add up to one conference room or meeting space for every seven workers. The campus will include walkable paths between buildings, green spaces, cafes, and on-site fitness centers.

“The premise is we are doing buildings that are flexible enough that however they choose to work and collaborate, whether by project team or skill team or a combination of both, that the facility would support different types of organization,” explained SmithGroupJJR principal Carl Roehling, describing how the design was developed with Ford’s changing work model in mind. “We are allowing them to evolve into it and change the way they are working by getting the buildings out of the way of their changing organization.”

Sustainability is also a major concern for Ford, as it sees the campus as a part of its larger push to rethink the company and its products. The design calls for a minimum Silver certification through the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design process as well as LEED Gold certification. A new Sustainability Showcase building on the Product Campus will be net-zero waste, net-zero energy, and net-zero water. Geothermal heating and cooling and solar-power generation mean the building will be able to produce more energy than it uses. As a whole, the campuses will reduce Ford’s energy consumption by 50 percent over its current Dearborn spaces.

Not only will the campus utilize the latest technology to achieve its sustainable goals, the campus itself will be used as a testing ground for Ford’s latest designs and development. In a shift from being a dedicated auto company, Ford has launched the Ford Smart Mobility plan. The plan aims to investigate connectivity, mobility, technology, customer experience, and big data. As part of the investigation, 25 global experiments have been launched, including three in Dearborn. The experiments will include Dearborn employees testing rapid charging and car sharing, big-data collection, and a car-swap program. As Ford’s main research and development facilities, the campuses will also have access to the latest in autonomous vehicles, on-demand shuttles, and eBikes.

At the heart of the Product Campus will be a new 700,000-square-foot Design Center, which will include new design studios and an outdoor design courtyard. The current Design Showroom will be converted into an event space. Construction has already begun on the Product Campus, including the Design Center and the Research and Engineering Center, with a goal of completion in 2023.

The second campus will comprise of the Ford World Headquarters and the Ford Credit facility. With plans to begin in 2021, this campus will maintain the iconic appearance of the current SOM-designed Ford Headquarters from 1956, while renovating 1.3 million square feet of workspace. Employees will also have access to new outdoor recreation facilities, including softball and soccer fields, and a renewed Arjay Miller Arboretum. Other greenspaces will include native plantings and large tree-shaded areas.

Along with Ford’s recently completed Palo Alto campus, the new Dearborn campuses will be the model on which Ford plans to update all of its facilities worldwide. At 199,000 employees and 67 plants spread across the globe, this will be no small task. With these new bold campuses, Ford has shown that its built environment is going to be integral to its next 100 years. 

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Wayne State University breaks ground on new business school

Detroit’s Wayne State University has broken ground on the Mike Ilitch School of Business. The new building was designed by Detroit-based SmithGroupJJR, and is named after the Little Caesars founder Mike Ilitch. The school will be part of The District Detroit, a multi-block entertainment district which includes the under-construction Little Caesars Arena. When completed the school will house 3,000 undergraduate and graduate students. The new building includes open collaboration space, student support facilities, a conference learning center, classrooms, lab space, and faculty offices. “We’ve already seen a boost in applications as a result of the gift announcement last fall, as prospective students recognize the opportunity that comes from studying in an innovative environment and location like this,” remarked Robert Forsythe, Dean of the Mike Ilitch School of Business. The genesis of the new school was a gift of $40 million from Mike and Marian Ilitch. The gift is the largest Wayne State has ever received, and is in the top ten for largest gifts to any public business school in the United States. Along with the Ilitch family’s philanthropic investments in Detroit, the family has an estimated $2 billion of investments in downtown Detroit buildings. These include the Little Caesars Area and a recently announced headquarters for Little Caesars, also designed by SmithGroupJJR.
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Little Caesars releases renderings of new Detroit headquarters

Downtown Detroit is getting its first new corporate headquarters building in nearly 15 years. The Detroit-based Little Caesars pizza company has released the first renderings of their planned 234,000-square-foot headquarters. The Little Caesars Global Resource Center will be the new home of approximately 700 employees. Located across the street from the company’s current headquarters, the buildings will be connected with a 7th-floor skywalk. The project will be one of the first to be built as part of $1.3 billion The District Detroit development. The District Detroit is centered on the under-construction Little Caesars Arena, the future home of the NHL’s Detroit Red Wings hockey team. The Ilitch family, founders of Little Caesars, are heavily involved with the development and own much of the land it will be built on. The defining feature of the new headquarters will be a triangulated mullionless facade. The Detroit-based SmithGroupJJR designed the 120 glass panels to echo the shape of the company’s main product, as well as provide unobstructed views in and out of the building. Each glass panel will be 14 feet tall and comprised of two inches of laminated glass. The building will hold collaborative workspaces, informal meeting rooms, and a cafe for workers. The ground floor will include a two-story lobby and a new welcome center. The street front will also have a flagship Little Caesars and other retail. A fitness center and 425-seat training room are also planned for the building. The Resource Center will function as the company’s headquarters as well as a training and research facility. Originally announced in 2014, construction is expected to begin this summer, which a move in date of fall 2017.        
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Ford sets its sights on a radical new high-tech Headquarters

This month, Ford motorcar company will break ground on a new complex as part of a major upgrade to its 60-year old Dearborn campus in Michigan. New buildings, located in two campus' designed by Michigan-based architecture firm SmithGroupJJR, will see a fifty-percent reduction in energy consumption, save water, and include a new zero-waste, zero-energy, zero-water Sustainability Showcase building. The move comes as Ford attempts to realign their focus within the rapidly changing automobile industry. “As we transition to an auto and a mobility company, we’re investing in our people and the tools they use to deliver our vision,” said Ford President and CEO Mark Fields. “Bringing our teams together in an open, collaborative environment will make our employees’ lives better, speed decision-making and deliver results for both our core and emerging businesses.” https://youtu.be/VOrHhaEnvEM Of the two new campus' in question, one will be devoted to "products" and the other will act as a headquarters. Together they will comprise 70 buildings for 30,000 employees. Within they ten year time span Ford have set their sights on "more than 7.5 million square feet of work space will be rebuilt and upgraded into even more technology-enabled and connected facilities." Within the campus' a network of walkable community with paths, trails, and covered walkways will connect buildings. On the product campus, autonomous vehicles, on-demand shuttles and eBikes will also be available to use. The showpiece however, will be a new state-of-the-art design center that will boast more than 700,000 square feet of space for design studios as well as an outdoor courtyard for work and socializing. Meanwhile, at the second campus, 1.3 million square feet will be transformed to house the Ford World Headquarters and a Ford Credit facility. All in all, the transformation will see an additional 100 acres of green space and 3.8 million square feet of new buildings. Construction is due to begin this month at the Ford Research and Engineering Center (to become the new product campus), while Ford says that they expect most of the work to be done by 2023. Work on the Ford World Headquarters will begin in 2021, being complete by 2026.