Posts tagged with "SOM":

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Neil Meredith of Gehry Technolgies Presents The Burj Khalifa Ceiling at Facades+PERFORMANCE

October is upon us, which means that the Chicago edition of Facades+ PERFORMANCE is only a few weeks away! Be there as leading innovators from across the AEC industry converge on Chicago from October 24th and 25th at AN and Enclos' highly anticipated event to discuss the cutting-edge processes and technologies behind the facades of today’s most exciting built projects. Don't miss your chance to take part in our groundbreaking lineup of symposia, keynotes, and workshops, and work side-by-side with the design and construction visionaries who are redefining performance for the next generation of building envelopes. Our Early Bird special has been extended until Wednesday, so register today to save on this unbeatable opportunity! Join Neil Meredith of Gehry Technolgies as he examine the relationship between digital design methodologies and real-world construction and fabrication constraints in the complex, wooden ceiling of the Burj Khalifa’s lobby. With representatives from Thornton Tomasetti and Imperial Woodworking, Meredith will lead an intimate, interdisciplinary discussion of the innovative, on-site solutions that his team developed in order to deliver one of the most visible features of the world’s tallest building, so don’t miss out on this rare opportunity! With the deadline fast approaching, Mederith and his team at Gehry Technoligies worked with SOM, Imperial Woodworking, and Icon Integrated Construction to develop new systems, mid-construction, for the design and fabrication of the large, double-curved, wooden ceiling of the Burj Khalifa. Coordinating the work of architects, fabricators, and construction professionals through complex, shared parametric models, Meredith redesigned the ceiling system from the ground up using pre-fabricated, unitized panels to create its astounding, wooden forms. Join in the discussion to hear the rest of this dramatic AEC industry saga in the not-to-be-missed dialog workshop, “Designing for Wood Fabrication in Complex Geometries: The Burh Khalifa Ceiling,” and learn the technologies and techniques behind the creation of this historic project. After earning his Masters in Architecture from Univeristy of Michigan Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, Neil Meredith taught and ran the Digital Fabrication Lab at his alma mater. Meredith earned hands-on experience with cutting edge design technologies and real-world construction challenges with Detroit-based design/build firm M1, the European Ceramic Workcentere in Holland, façade consulting office Front, and as founding partner of design and fabrication studio Sheet. In 2007 Meredith joined up with Gehry Technologies, the go-to design technology and consulting company for the industry’s leading architects. Through the pioneering use of the latest digital tools and processes, Gehry Technolgies has worked with world-class, visionary architects, like Zaha Hadid, David Childs, Jean Nouvel, and of course Mr. Gehry himself, to triumph in the realization of the truly innovative forms of some of the era’s most ground-breaking projects. Register for Facades+ PERFORMANCE today to take part in this and other exciting workshops and symposia. Featuring representatives from SOM, Morphosis, Thornton Tomasetti, and other industry-leading firms, this is one event that is not to be missed. Check out the full Facades+ PERFORMANCE site for the schedule of events and book your tickets now to start the next chapter in your professional career!
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Cory Brugger of Morphosis Redefines Performance at Facades+ Chicago

Anticipation is growing for AN and Enclos’ eagerly awaited Facades + PERFORMANCE conference, touching down in Chicago from October 24th to 25th. Leading innovators from the architecture, engineering, and construction industries will share their insights on the latest in cutting-edge facade technologies that are redefining what performance means for 21st Century architecture. Don’t miss your chance to join Cory Brugger, Director of Technology for Morphosis Architects, as he is joined by a group of industry specialists to lead an in-depth dialog workshop on expanding the idea of performance in the design, engineering, and fabrication of innovative building systems. "Traditionally, performance has been defined in singular terms," Brugger told AN, "but when it comes to delivering architecture, it can encompass everything from energy usage to fabrication technique. For us, performance is multifaceted and interdisciplinary. We have found that technology provides a platform for incorporating a variety of performance criteria in our design process, allowing us to create innovative architecture, like the Cornell NYC Tech project on Roosevelt Island." Set to open its doors in 2017, Morphosis’ winning design for the highly publicized Cornell Tech campus will be breaking ground on Roosevelt Island in the coming year. As part of this ambitious, 2.1 million square foot development, Brugger and his colleagues at Morphosis hope to earn LEED-Platinum certification by with their 150,000 square foot academic building by utilizing cutting-edge modeling techniques and an array of sustainable technologies. "In general, we are designing for extremely high EUI (energy use intensity) goals, which are being accomplished through the use of comprehensive models that integrate mechanical systems, day-lighting analysis, and architectural assemblies," said Brugger. "This effort is being supported by a 140,000+ square foot PV array that is integral to both the performance and aesthetics of the design. Other technologies include high performance facade systems, smart building technology, and geo-thermal wells." In conjunction with master-planners SOM and landscape architects James Corner Field Operations, Morphosis are working to create a new model for high-tech education in the information age by extending the definition of performance beyond traditional notions to incorporate far-sighted social and technological considerations. Reserve your space at Facades+ PERFORMANCE now to take part in an intimate discussion. Brugger will be joined my Paul Martin (Zahner), Tyler Goss (CASE), Matt Herman (Burro Happold), and Marty Doscher (Dassault Systèmes ) on Friday, October 25th at the Illinois Institute of Technology Main Campus in Chicago. Don’t forget to check out our other exciting key-notes, symposia, and workshops on the complete Facades+ PERFORMANCE schedule.
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Website Offers Tour Inside SOM’s Mauna Kea Beach Hotel

Located on the paradisiacal island of Hawaii, the Mauna Kea Beach Hotel designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill (SOM) has been critically acclaimed by architectural experts and luxury aficionados for its modest yet stunning elegance. In celebration of its classic design and architectural beauty, the hotel has launched a microsite where tourists can read about the resort's history, virtually explore its modernist look, and take a sneak peak at hotel founder Laurance S. Rockefeller’s private 1,600-piece art collection. Named for the million-year-old Mauna Kea volcano, the 258-room hotel was designed by SOM's Edward Charles Bassett. When it opened its doors in 1965, it was immediately considered one of the nation’s most exclusive hotels. A 2006 Hawaii earthquake ravaged the island's coast and caused severe structural damage to the hotel, closing the resort for the next two years. In December 2008, after tedious renovation efforts and $150 million in restoration expenses, the Mauna Kea re-opened its doors with a warm aloha spirit. Rockefeller wanted the Mauna Kea to embody a blend of cultures at the heart of the bucolic Hawaiian islands. His desire was not to alter the landscape, but rather to have the hotel blend into its surroundings. The hotel's design follows the land’s natural shapes and curves and incorporates lava rock within the hotel’s structure. In 2007, the hotel received an Honor Award from the American Institute of Architects (AIA) in recognition of its unique open-air design, natural ventilation system, and oceanfront accessibility. The Mauna Kea art collection, distributed throughout the hotel, encompasses 1,600 pieces originating from Art from India, Southeast Asia, China, Japan, Melanesia, and Polynesia.
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Unveiled> SOM Designs New Library Branch for Chicago’s Chinatown

In the first-ever design/build process for a Chicago neighborhood library branch, Skidmore, Owings and Merrill joins Wight & Company construction to replace Chinatown’s aging and heavily trafficked library at 2100 South Wentworth Avenue. It’s part of a $66 million “investment to build expand and modernize our library system,” Mayor Rahm Emanuel said in a statement. The new facility replaces the existing branch located in a leased building at 2353 S. Wentworth Ave. That branch is one of the busiest in the city, averaging about 21,000 visitors per month in 2012. SOM’s design appears to be a two-story oval, shaded from all but head-on angles by wood fins perpendicular to its glass façade. Slated to open in 2015, the new library branch is a long time coming. TIF funds will finance some of the development, which is currently in the land acquisition phase.
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Unveiled> SOM Designs Mashreq Bank Tower in Dubai

Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) announced last week it would design a new headquarters for Dubai-based Mashreq Bank. The 32-story tower is “a quiet sculptural form within Dubai’s skyline,” SOM Design Director Ross Wimer said in a statement. Its L-shaped floor plate is cantilevered around an empty volume between the building’s eight-story podium and its top levels. The building’s massing shields that courtyard from solar gain, while opening up views to Sheikh Zayed Road and the Burj Khalifa to the east. Executive offices occupy the top two floors, where the square floorplate resumes, with Mashreq’s Board Room suspended from an interior opening at the middle.
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SOM’s Los Angeles Federal Courthouse Breaks Ground

SOM's first major project in Los Angeles in years, the Los Angeles U.S. Courthouse, broke ground last week. Those in attendance included new LA mayor Eric Garcetti, who's just beginning his rounds of ceremonial events around the city. The downtown commission, located at First Street and Broadway, was awarded late last year. The 600,000 square foot building will include 24 courtrooms and 32 judicial chambers and will house the U.S. District Court and the Central District of California, among other facilities. Renderings reveal a serrated, glassy cube resting on a narrow, solid pedestal, and a sky-lit central courtyard at the building's core. The project is pursuing a LEED Platinum rating. The design build team also includes Clark Construction and Jacobs Project Management. Completion is scheduled for summer 2016.
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Frank Gehry’s Ice Blocks Chilling Out Inside Chicago’s Inland Steel Building

Follow the Architecture Chicago Plus blog as Lynn Becker raises an eyebrow at the new sculpture that quietly popped up in the lobby of downtown Chicago’s celebrated Inland Steel Building. The 1957 SOM icon seems to have acquired a consortium of ice hunks, courtesy Frank Gehry. Ostensibly a formal counterpoint to the elegant energy of Richard Lippold’s Radiant I, the original lobby art, Gehry’s glass agglomeration (fabricated by the John Lewis Glass Studio of Oakland, California) frames Radiant I and responds to its angularity with carved blobs. It’s admittedly atypical in the setting of the modernist masterpiece, but doesn’t overpower the space or the original artwork.
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Four Firms Radically Re-Envision a New Penn Station and Madison Square Garden

When Madison Square Garden’s 50-year special permit expired last year, it launched a fiery debate over the future of the arena atop Penn Station.  Critics, urban planners, and government officials have called for a 10-year term limit to encourage the relocation of MSG allowing for an overhaul of the crowded station. Today the Municipal Art Society of New York unveiled four different visions for a re-imagined Penn Station and MSG from firms Diller Scofidio + Renfro, H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture, SHoP Architects, and Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM). Each firm offered up its own rendition—some focused more on expanding infrastructure, while others honed in on opportunities for cultural and educational programming and new amenities within the station. But all the firms decided to relocate the arena, make room for green space, and create a new light-filled and spacious train terminal. And on the more far-reaching side, they envisioned and described this new station as a civic hub that will anchor and reinvigorate the surrounding neighborhood and serve as a “gateway” (a buzz word liberally used at the unveiling) for the city. The presentations were a fantastical exercise in design if all variables—funding, political might, and private interests—miraculously came together. H3 Hardy Collaboration Architecture was the first to take the stage. The firm recommends re-locating Madison Square Garden to a 16-acre site on the waterfront by the Javits Center, which would then pave the way for a new Penn Station to be built with an eight-track high-speed rail, a three-acre park, retail space, and a roof garden. The Farley Post Office would then be transformed into a Center for Education and the four corners of the station would be privately developed  “hybrid buildings.” SOM has concentrated on providing a robust infrastructure with a network of high-speed rail lines for the North East Corridor, better commuter rail service, and rail lines linking to the major airports in the area. The station will have a ticketing hall in center of building and then two concourses below with retail spaces. The firm would move Madison Square Garden to an adjacent location and imagines private development will crop up around the station. Charles Renfro of Diller Scofidio + Renfro described their “Penn Station 3.0” as a “grand civic space founded on growth and innovation.” The transit node would become “both a front door and living room” that would be “alive 24/7” and organized by “fast, transit-oriented programs” and “slower” activities including retail, cultural space, and restaurants. MSG would then be moved to the west end of the Farley building. “In closing, we basically would put a wrecking ball to the site,” said Elizabeth Diller. SHoP Architecture’s Vishaan Chakrabarti started off talking about safety as a critical challenge to the current Penn Station aggravated by a “lack of air” and “disorientation”  caused by MSG. The firm envisions an open, light-filled station that would be at the heart of a new district they’ve dubbed “Gotham Gateway.” They would relocate MSG to the Morgan site and create “a link from east to west and north to south” connecting the station, a new park, and the arena. While the other presenters focused on design, SHoP dipped its toe in public policy side of the equation. The firm is calling for the creation of a “Gateway Task Force” consisting of the Vice President, US Transportation Secretary, the governor, and the mayor, which would serve to facilitate a relocation of MSG, spearhead the Gateway Project (including funds for new tunnel, track and station), and provide necessary amenities.
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Philip Vourvoulis Leads April 12 Workshop on Architectural Glass

facades_01 If you’ve seen the giant etched-glass dragon snaking across the ceiling at Shun Lee Palace in New York, you’ve glimpsed of the handiwork of Philip Vourvoulis, an expert in architectural glass known for his work on projects ranging from museums to residences to restaurants. On April 12, Vourvoulis will lead the workshop "The Challenges of Glass Architecture: Controlling the Appearance and Performance of Glass in the Building Facade" part of  Facades + PERFORMANCE, an upcoming conference on high-performance building enclosures sponsored by The Architect’s Newspaper. At the workshop, Vourvoulis will be joined by Christoph Timm of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Bruce Milley of Guardian Industries, and Nick Bagatelos of BISEM. In the form of an interactive panel discussion, the group will explore the latest in architectural glass materials and processes, including new printing processes, electrochromic products, and other high-performance glazings. Using case studies, the workshop will highlight strategies to optimize performance while maintaining aesthetic control. This workshop offers 4 LU/HSW AIA CE credits. Vourvoulis, who has his own California-based consulting firm and also serves as acting creative director for the LA fabricator Triview Industries, trained as a ceramicist but soon fell in love with glass thanks to an encounter with the Art Deco glasswork in the Shangri-La Hotel in Santa Monica. "I'm fascinated by the plasticity of the material," Vourvouli told the LA Times. "You can take a blank sheet or a melted lump and out of it conjure magic." Collaborating with numerous architects over the last decades, including Frank GehryStephen Ehrlich, and landscape architect Maggie Jencks, Vourvoulis’ work has evolved along with the technological innovations in glass. New this year, "dialog workshops" offer a daylong series of in-depth conversations with leading architects, fabricators, developers and engineers following presentations their current projects as real-world case studies. With a limited number of spaces in each session, the intimate environment  aims to encourage conversation and creative problem-solving, and participants create a customized schedule of half-day workshops to suit their professional goals. To register, click here.
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Proposal Aims to Put Penn Station’s Move Back on Track

The plan to relocate Pennsylvania Station to the James Farley Post Office across the street has been slow in coming. The developers, Related Companies and Vornado Realty Trust, are now revisiting a previously-rejected proposal to move the Borough of Manhattan Community College (BMCC) to what will be Penn Station’s new home, called Moynihan Station—named after Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan who first introduced the idea in the 1990s. The New York Times reported that the college would theoretically occupy 1.1 million square feet of the building, and in return, the developer would take over BMCC’s campus downtown. But, it looks like government officials still have their reservations. Some progress has been made, however. The state has provided around $300 million for the construction of a new passageway and two new entrances leading to Penn’s train platforms. Skidmore, Owings and Merrill designed the plans for the renovation of the station.
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Take An Aerial Tour of Dubai From the Top of the Burj Khalifa

Scrap your afternoon plans and take an amazing aerial tour of Dubai, instead. Photographer Gerald Donovan has created an interactive panorama of the city as seen from the top of the world's tallest building, the Burj Khalifa for the Hamdan Bin Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum International Photography Award. The view was taken from the top of the tower, some 2,722 feet above the street, reached by climbing nearly 660 feet through the Burj Khalifa's enormous spire. Users can pan around and zoom in to observe the surrounding cityscape with amazing detail. To achieve the stunning effect, Donovan stitched 70 photographs together, each a whopping 80 megapixels, to create a single 2.5 gigapixel panorama. [Via The Telegraph.]
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New Peeks at SOM’S LA Federal Courthouse

We’ve known for some time that SOM will be designing the new US Courthouse in Downtown Los Angeles. We've even gotten some glimpses of their scheme. But the firm has just unveiled new images of the project, filling out the picture of this new landmark for the city on the corner of 1st Street and Broadway. The familiar image of a cube-like, 550,000-square-foot structure in the middle of the city is now accompanied by a closer view of a folded glass façade imbedded with a United States seal. The building, which floats above a central core, appears to cantilever outward on all sides, with ramps and a small park leading the way to the entry.  Inside we get a peek at a large central atrium rising several stories, and walls made of some kind of blond stone. Exposed central stairs appear to make climbing upward a public process. SOM is still unable to comment on their scheme, but we’ll let you know when that changes.