Posts tagged with "Rogers Stirk Harbour Partners":

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Jeanne Gang and Renzo Piano are making their mark on Canada with a spate of new projects

It’s time to go north of the border as The Architect’s Newspaper checks out some of the highest-profile projects that have been announced across Canada this year. A strong economy has driven construction across the country, and Toronto, in particular, has an abundance of notable buildings breaking ground. From subdued civic structures to prismatic rental towers, 2018 has brought a surfeit of high-profile projects to America’s northern neighbor. One Delisle Studio Gang Toronto, Ontario Studio Gang could end up making a major mark on Toronto’s skyline with its first Canadian project, a 48-story multifaceted tower. The rental building has been designed with 16 sides made up of overlapping eight-story hexagonal modules, and each segment will contain enclosed balconies and be topped with garden terraces for residents. The overlap of the modules resembles scales or the natural spiraling of growing plants, and the effect creates a different view of the tower depending on the angle of approach. An existing 1929 Art Deco facade will be moved over to the base of a neighboring tower, and the base of One Delisle will relate to the historic facade to maintain a cogent street wall. Toronto Courthouse Renzo Piano Building Workshop and NORR Architects & Engineers Toronto, Ontario Renzo Piano Building Workshop (RPBW)’s first project in Canada will consolidate many of Toronto’s smaller courts into a centrally-located municipal building next to the city’s Superior Court of Justice. The building is reminiscent of Piano’s work on the Jerome L. Greene Science Center for Columbia University, both in its boxy massing and in its open ground level, created by raising the base of the building several stories. Despite the courthouse’s wide-open atrium space, the building has been designed with security in mind, and cameras, baggage checkpoints, and internal security corridors will be deployed throughout. The first museum in Ontario to focus on the history of the indigenous justice system will also be located inside. Construction is on track to finish in 2022.
The HUB/30 Bay Street Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) Toronto, Ontario The recently-revealed design for The HUB, a 1.4 million-square-foot tower proposed for Toronto’s South Core neighborhood, is the result of an international design competition for a building that would have a major impact on Toronto’s skyline. The HUB will float over the adjacent Toronto Harbour Commission Building courtesy of a cantilevering base, and create what Senior Partner Graham Stirk describes as 'a harmony' between the two buildings. The use of external structural steel lends the tower a more industrial feeling, and RSHP is promising that the tower will contain column-free office space and a multi-story atrium as a result. Toronto’s Spadina Line expansion stations The Spadina Group Associates and All Design Toronto, Ontario Construction in Toronto is not limited to new towers. Humbler additions to public infrastructure have also been taking shape. Toronto’s largest subway extension in decades opened late last year with six new stations, including two colorful facilities from the late Will Alsop’s All Design. The boxy, zebra-striped second story of the Finch West Station cantilevers over the building's main entrance and is capped with an enormous red window at one end. A concrete 'skirt' floats around the station’s base and offers shelter to riders who are waiting for a bus outside. Inside, Alsop uses touches of color to lighten up the polished concrete interiors. For Pioneer Village, Alsop wrapped the cantilevering station in Corten steel. This station is much rounder than Finch West and uses a red band around the base of the building’s front to direct riders to the main entrance. A geometric canopy rises from the station’s back and creates a covered waiting area for the two regional bus lines that service the station. The same polished concrete seen at Finch West was used inside. Barclay Village Büro Ole Scheeren Vancouver, British Columbia Vancouver has also seen significant growth recently, including the Shigeru Ban-designed hybrid timber tower. Ole Scheeren’s recently-revealed twin towers sit in Vancouver’s West End neighborhood, and according to Scheeren, they use balconies, setbacks, and offsets to create a more welcoming face in contrast to the typical monolithic glass tower typology. All of the terraces are planted, and a rooftop plaza sits on top of the base that links the two towers. Scheeren claims that the driving concept for Barclay Village was to elevate the concept of the village skyward to match Vancouver’s overall verticality.
The Winnipeg Art Gallery’s Inuit Art Centre (IAC) Michael Maltzan Architecture Winnipeg, Manitoba This curvilinear four-story museum from Michael Maltzan broke ground in Winnipeg last month, and when complete in 2020, the building will become the largest Inuit art gallery in the world. A double-height glazed atrium at the museum’s base will be anchored by a central 'vault' protected by curved glass, and visitors can freely examine Inuit artifacts as they walk around the ground level. An 8,500-square-foot gallery on the third floor will display Inuit art. The sculptural facade of the building’s stone portion was reportedly inspired by the “immense, geographical features that form the background of many Inuit towns and inlets.” The IAC is an extension of the neighboring Winnipeg Art Gallery, and every floor with connect with the original building.
 
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Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners reveals new renderings of its Tribeca condo tower

The New York Times has dropped new renderings of the Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners-designed One Beekman, Richard Rogers’ first residential building in the U.S. Although the 25-story mixed-use tower began rising in Tribeca in 2017, this is the first time that polished renderings have been released–including a glimpse at the spacious interiors. One Beekman is rising at the intersection of Park Row and Beekman Street diagonally across from City Hall Park. The entire building has been oriented for this view, with the circulation core shifted south, allowing each living room in the 31 condo units to look out on the park through oversized windows. This was also borne out of necessity; COOKFOX’s 54-story Park Row will be rising directly behind One Beekman. “We pulled the core right to the back, where there isn’t any view, and made the building very solid there,” Graham Stirk, the partner leading the project, the Times. The newly revealed aluminum facade extrudes from the tower’s bulk and divides to frame individual windows, aping SoHo’s cast-iron buildings and giving residents access to their own park-facing loggias. Perforated copper screens will infill the spaces between the building’s framing and the facade, the warm color of the metal referencing the brick and terracotta of the Beekman Hotel across the street. Retail space will go up on the first two floors, with office spaces on the third and fourth, amenities for condo owners on the fifth, and residential units proper starting on the sixth floor. Moving the residential section upwards has the beneficial side effect of preserving views of the park for the tower’s residents. Inside, Rogers has used a clean and light material palette for the residential areas. White oak flooring, “Tundra Grey” marble, and white-grey concrete lends the whole space an airy feel, and condo owners can expect a gym, yoga studio, common outdoor terrace, and an entertainment space on the fifth floor. Developer Urban Muse and real estate firm Compass are launching sales later this month, with prices ranging from $2 million all the way up to $14 million. Construction is moving swiftly, with One Beekman expected to top out this month and wrap construction in the middle of 2019. Rogers is no stranger to downtown Manhattan; the firm's 3 World Trade Center is nearly complete and slated to open on June 11th.
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Construction begins on Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’s Spy Museum

British architect Richard Rogers and his London-based firm Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RHSP) saw construction break ground on the not-so-well hidden International Spy Museum in Washington D.C. Situated on L’Enfant Plaza, the 140,000-square-foot museum is part of wider effort to reinvigorate the area. It will replace the current 19th Century building located in Penn Quarter. According to a press release from RHSP, the new museum will offer a "glass veil" that will be draped in front of a "enclosed black box exhibition space." This will let the buildings circulation be viewed from both interior and exterior perspectives, something that the architects say will contribute "new energy along 10th Street." The "sense of veil" and "black box" will also be visual cues evoking the secrecy and mystery associated with espionage. "Behind this veil, the prominent facade of the box angles out over the street and public space to one side, breaking the building line to create a disruptive landmark at the crest of 10th Street, visible from the National Mall at one end and Banneker Park at the other," the firm said. In addition to this, the new building will also expand exhibit and educational spaces, including a theater and "unique" event spaces.  The aforementioned event spaces and a roof terrace will be located above a double-height lobby. Working with the Malrite Company from Cleveland, who founded the museum, the District was able to make sure that the museum stayed in D.C. “As a Navy veteran, I, along with my family, take pride in setting the stage for the International Spy Museum to grow," said Milton Maltz, the founder of The Malrite Company. “We consider it essential to ensuring the contributions of the dedicated men and women who serve in our intelligence agencies. They are recognized for the invaluable roles they’ve played in winning wars and protecting Americans at home and around the globe.” "The international spy museum has long been a destination for residents and visitors, finding innovative ways to keep us connected with our past," said D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser. "The new museum will be a welcome addition to southwest as we continue to attract businesses and expand economic opportunity." The museum is due to open at some point in 2018, however, the museum's lease at its current location at 800 F Street NW is set to end in 2017.
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Richard Rogers beats Norman Foster and UNStudio for Taoyuan International Airport terminal commission

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners have fought off fellow British architecture practice Foster + Partners and Amsterdam-based UNStudio to design the Terminal 3 building at Taoyuan International, Taiwan's largest airport. The firm won by a unanimous decision, AN has learned. In 2014, the airport was the world's 11th busiest passenger airport. The 158-acre airport terminus will see 45 million passengers pass through every year and will be situated adjacent to the China Airlines Headquarters and share some services with neighboring Terminal 2. The building is due to be complete by 2020. Rogers' firm worked with local practice Fei & Cheng Associates and Arup engineers. UNStudio, run by Ben van Berkel, also took the approach of appointing a local firm for the project in working with Bio-Architecture Formosana and April Yang Design Studio. Foster, on the other hand, chose to work individually. Taoyuan International Airport is based 24 miles outside Taipei, the capital of Taiwan and was once known as Chiang Kai-shek International. The winner was selected from a jury comprised Michael Speaks, dean of Syracuse University's school of architecture; Marcos Cruz, director of the Bartlett School of Architecture; and Kwang-Yu King, curator of the 2012 Hong Kong & Shenzhen Biennale.  
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Richard Rogers to lead parliamentary inquiry into how design of the built environment affects behavior

Riding on a wave of psychographic research indicating positive correlations between productivity and the work environment, architect Richard Rogers has launched an ambitious parliamentary inquiry into how design overall affects behavior. The founder of Rogers Stirk Harbor + Partners kicked off the eight-month Design Commission inquiry this June before the Houses of Parliament in London. The cross-party investigation led by Rogers will explore how design in planning of the built environment creates a tendency towards positive behaviors within local communities. The inquiry was lodged the same week as newly-released research which supports the long-held view that cities which promote physical activity benefit from economic productivity gains. “The commission believes that in designing and constructing environments in which people live and work, architects and planners are necessarily involved in influencing human behavior,” Rogers said in a statement. The All Party Parliamentary Design & Innovation Group calls for examples of how infrastructure can incorporate “design for good behaviors.” The APDIG is also seeking case studies where design-led planning has positively affected communities. The deadline to submit evidence to the inquiry is July 3. The final report will produce a series of recommendations designed to stimulate new thinking in planning policy across local and central government. “While we welcome recent government use of nudge theory principles in policy-making decisions, the commission identifies a need to further develop and reinvigorate thinking in the field,” said Rogers, who, in a recent editorial for The Standard, called London's below-capacity housing market "dysfunctional" as the result of poor planning. In pondering how the built environment affects our attitudes, outlook and behaviors, the inquiry attempts to address the three following questions:
  1. Does the built environment affect the behavior of individuals or communities? Is there evidence to suggest that it does or does not?
  2. Are there examples of changes in behavior on the part of people in the UK in relation to any aspect of the built environment?
  3. Are there any examples where people have changed their behavior as a result of some aspect of the built environment?
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Video> Richard Rogers Builds a Prefabricated Multi-Level House In 24 Hours

With modular homes on the rise, it seems to be time to bid farewell to long months and even years of construction and salute fast-paced, pre-fabricated systems arriving across the globe. At the Royal Academy in London as part of the Inside Out exhibition, Richard Rogers’ firm Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (RSHP) has introduced an innovative, environmentally efficient, three-and-a-half story home called the Homeshell. It is meant to inspire discussion about affordable mass housing. The flat-packed home on display contains individually installed windows and boasts a low environmental impact. Colorful facade materials enliven the closed timber frame system. Above: Construction crews raise the building from scratch to fill the courtyard in minutes, piece by piece. Constructed of Insulshell—a malleable, cost- and energy-efficient building system developed by Sheffield Insulated Group and Cox Bench—the Homeshell arrives as flat-pack panels on a single truck and takes a mere 24 hours to construct on site using tilt-up construction techniques. Within the structure, visitors can watch a time-lapse film of the  construction and learn how the building system fits together. The Homeshell is open to the public until September 8, and then the installation will be disassembled and recreated in Mitcham, where it will serve as the showhouse for the YMCA South West Y:Cube Housing project’s potential tenants, designed by RSHP. According to RSHP senior partner Ivan Harbour, the Homeshell “delivers generous space, exceptional insulation, daylight and acoustics. We believe it holds many answers for well-designed and sustainable urban living and could change the way we think about our housing into the future. Having it at the Royal Academy will provoke debate about how architectural innovation might help us meet the UK’s housing needs—for everyone.”
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Slideshow> Foster Won, But Check out Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, & Richard Rogers’ NYC Visions

Park Avenue in Manhattan is ready to grow taller, and a starchitect-filled competition won by Lord Norman Foster revealed the first of what's likely to be many new towers along the corridor. But what of the three runners up? Renderings from all four finalist—Zaha Hadid, Richard Rogers, OMA, and Norman Foster—have now been released by L&L Holdings and Lehman Brothers detailing four distinct visions for the future of the New York skyscraper. Foster's final winning design will be presented at the Municipal Arts Society's Summit for New York City, which begins on Thursday, October 18 (Foster will present on Friday at 9 a.m.). Also during the two day summit, an exhibition displaying the work of all four finalists' designs will be on view. Proposal by Zaha Hadid Height: 669 feet; Stories: 40 “The design challenge for 425 Park Avenue lies in producing a structure of timeless elegance, yet with a strong identity that reflects the complex and sophisticated age in which it was created and mirrors the exceptional setting in which it is placed. Our approach has been to unite the four fundamental qualities for the project — Function, Design, Culture and Value — and fuse them into a single seamless design which incorporates these characteristics in a harmonious and unified architectural concept. “With its breezy views up and down Park Avenue and breath-taking vistas of Central Park, the new building is quintessentially “New York” in its very definition. Its sleek verticality breathes the very essence of the city, while its gentle curves evoke a new dynamism of form which is both distinctly contemporary and ageless. This harmony is equally reflected in the building’s openness, flexible design and technological efficiency, providing an adaptable architectural context that allows it to accommodate its tenants’ requirements and desires." - Zaha Hadid Proposal by OMA Height: 648 feet; Stories: 38 “Our current aesthetics oscillate between nearly exhausted orthogonality and a still immature curvaceousness. “Our building is an intersection of these two observations: it proposes a stack of three cubes —the lower one a full solid block on Park Avenue, the smallest on top, rotated 45 degrees vis-a-vis the Manhattan grid, oriented beyond its mere location in a sweep from Midtown to Central Park. “The three cubes are connected by curved planes to create a subtle alternation of flat and 3 dimensional places, each reflecting sky and city in their own way." - Rem Koolhaas Proposal by Rogers Stirk Harbour Partners Height: 665 feet; Stories: 44 “We have created a contemporary homage to the quintessential New York skyscraper, by designing a tower that will define the next chapter in their illustrious story. Our solution acknowledges the design attributes of its neighbours on Park Avenue, but brings new qualities: honest expression; generosity; efficiency and humanity. The clear expression of the process of construction is evident from the huge 43 storey steel frame down to the smallest detail, this gives the building a human scale. “In designing sky gardens, we are reconnecting workers and the city with nature, by using different American landscape ecologies, from forest to alpine, to suit the different altitudes of each garden. These spaces also offer great views of the park and the metropolis." - Lord Richard Rogers Winning Proposal by Foster + Partners   [ More Info ] Height: 687 feet; Stories: 41 “Our aim is to create an exceptional building, both of its time and timeless, as well as being respectful of its context and celebrated Modernist neighbours—a tower that is for the City and for the people that will work in it, setting a new standard for office design and providing an enduring landmark that befits its world-famous location. “Clearly expressing the geometry of its structure, the tapered steel-frame tower rises to meet three shear walls that will be illuminated, adding to the vibrant New York City skyline. Its elegant facade seamlessly integrates with an innovative internal arrangement that allows for three gradated tiers of column-free floors. Offering world-class, sustainable office accommodation, the new building anticipates changing needs in the workplace with large, flexible open floor plates. Each of the three tiers—low, medium and high-rise—is defined by a landscaped terrace with panoramic views across Manhattan and Central Park. To maximize the Park Avenue frontage, the core is placed to the rear, where glazed stairwells reveal long views towards the East River, while at street level, there is potential for a large civic plaza with significant works of art.” - Lord Norman Foster