Posts tagged with "RIBA":

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Architect Alan Jones named new RIBA President

Northern Irish architect Alan Jones will be the next president of the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA). Jones, who is currently RIBA vice-president of education and a senior lecturer at Queen's University Belfast where he runs his own practice, Alan Jones Architects, will take over from incumbent president Ben Derbyshire on September 1, 2019. Winning 52 percent of the vote (2,704 votes), Jones, in running for the title a second time, saw off Elsie Owusu and Philip Allsopp to become the 77th president of RIBA. In his campaign, Jones said he would "put architects first" and would look into holding a referendum on the institution's future.  This year's elections were notable for their controversy, particularly surrounding that of candidate Elsie Owusu. The founding member and the first chair of the Society of Black Architects was sent a "cease and desist" letter from RIBA, asking her to stop making "damaging public statements." The letter came after Owusu questioned the $230,000 salary of RIBA chief executive Alan Vallence at a presidential hustings. Jones, who was present, defended the salary saying that it had been compared to the earnings of CEOs at other charities by the RIBA Board (RIBA is a registered charity in the U.K.). Furthermore, in the build-up to the election, Owusu continued to criticize RIBA, accusing the institution of letting $1.4 million go missing in the project to refurbish its London headquarters at 76 Portland Place. All this as well came after a "death threat" email sent to Owusu in 2016 was leaked to the press in April. The email is believed to be a response to Owusu who said her failed attempt to become vice-president in 2015 was “tantamount to institutionalized racism.” Since coming second in this year's election, Owusu has reiterated her claims on RIBA's finances, calling on Jones to look into the situation. RIBA has denied any wrongdoing, citing that a Charity Commission investigation found no accountancy foul play.   Owusu heads-up her own firm, Elsie Owusu Architects and despite losing out on the presidency, was voted into being a RIBA Council Member this year. Philip Allsop is senior sustainability scientist with the Julie-Ann Wrigley Global Institute of Sustainability at Arizona State University, and is President of RIBA-USA. Alan Jones's statement:
I appreciate respect is not given lightly and must be earned. I am hugely grateful for the opportunity to follow in the footsteps of Ben Derbyshire and past presidents, people who I have huge respect for. I wish to build on their successes. The RIBA is a fantastic organisation with great resources, particularly its staff who I am keen to support more than ever. As individuals and as an institution, we need to come together to make the most of our assets, and make the case for our profession. We need to gather evidence and realise a more significant role and position in business and society. We must focus more on the pertinent issues that will increase the quality of service we provide and the added value we can bring. We must reduce our overheads and the loss of colleagues and expertise as they leave our profession because of the economics of our situation. Talent is universal and opportunity into and upward through our profession must be too.
Jones will serve as RIBA President until September 2021.
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Foster + Partners leads new path for British architecture apprenticeships

Future British architects may not have to go through the same full-time education as their predecessors. Aspiring architects in the U.K. will now be able to participate in architecture apprenticeships to gain entry into the profession. New standards established by 20 “trailblazer” U.K.-based architecture practices, led by Foster + Partners and developed in conjunction with the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA), will offer students a new pathway to qualification as an architect. There are two stages: Part I accreditation, to become architectural assistants, followed by Part II and Part III qualifications which are the final stages before becoming an accredited architect. Both standards have also been approved by the Institute for Apprenticeships, an executive non-departmental public body. Apprenticeships combine practical experience in the profession alongside academic courses, which can be delivered by any U.K. university offering an Architects Registration Board (ARB) qualification. Those who participate will be exempt from tuition fees and receive a salary. The program is meant to encourage students of different socio-economic backgrounds to enter the profession and is a step forward towards a more socially inclusive architecture profession. “This vital initiative will help us to improve the diversity of our profession, to attract young people to study architecture and provide more accessible routes to qualification and employment opportunities,” said RIBA President Ben Derbyshire. “The new Apprenticeship Standards will help to encourage the widest talent pool and address the underrepresentation of architects from lower socio-economic backgrounds who, without parental support, face barriers to full-time education.” Universities are expected to be ready to deliver courses starting September 2018. The 20 participating architecture groups are:
  • Foster + Partners (Chair)
  • Lipscomb Jones Architects (Architectural Assistant standard sub-lead)
  • Hawkins/Brown (Architect standard sub-lead)
  • Seven Architecture (Architectural Assistant assessment sub-lead)
  • Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios (Architectural Assistant assessment sub-lead)
  • Scott Brownrigg (Architect assessment sub-lead)
  • Pollard Thomas Edwards (Architecture Apprenticeships Guide sub-lead)
  • Allford Hall Monaghan Morris
  • ARUP
  • BDP
  • Grimshaw Architects
  • HLM Architects
  • HOK
  • HTA Design LLP
  • Perkins + Will
  • PLP Architecture
  • Purcell
  • Ryder
  • Stanton Williams
  • tp bennett
     
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Sam Jacob presents the power of perspective with a new show at RIBA in London

With perspective comes power, and a fun-filled, quirky demonstration of this can be found in Disappear Here at the Royal Institution of British Architects (RIBA) in London, courtesy of British architect Sam Jacob and curator Marie Bak Mortensen. Disappear Here greets visitors with a vestibule of turquoise tones. Faux entrances, layered like a theatre set, recede in height and hue in a nod to the techniques employed by Renaissance painters who used light shades of blue to indicate depth in paintings. Before this, however, it was Florentine architect Filippo Brunelleschi who, in the 1400s, discovered linear perspective as a system of drawing and thus brought science and art in a collision that gave birth to the Renaissance. However, none of Brunelleschi's work is on display. Half a millennium after the Italian master's existence, Florence, his home town, had produced more architectural superstars: Cristiano Toraldo di Francia, Adolfo Natalini, Gian Piero Frassinelli, Alessandro Poli and brothers Roberto and Alessandro Magris who comprised Superstudio. The firm's work, earmarked by grid motifs, is featured throughout Disappear Here with two mirrored wells (great for peering into and taking a selfie), and two drawings: Un Viaggio nelle Regioni della Ragione (A Journey to the Realm of Reason) and Graz. The latter links up with a rare, albeit mediocre, perspective drawing done on the back of another—supposedly much more impressive piece—from Andrea Palladio. For one wall, Jacob and Mortensen's method was to marry drawings through their lines of perspective, imagining their continuation off the page. This link would be easily missed if not for an explanation in an accompanying leaflet, which also provides a tutorial on linear perspective drawing. Jacob, though, was excited by what he could do using this method of arrangement. "It's brought together works which should never belong next to each other," he told The Architect's Newspaper (AN). Case in point: a pair of trolls urinating into a castellated fountain, drawn by British architect John Smythson, sits below Superstudio's Un Viaggio nelle Regioni della Ragione, which in turn lies left of a sketch by Edwin Lutyens portraying an unrealized memorial in France. The eclectic trio of drawings makes for remarkable viewing, and the wall throws up some humorous examples of failed attempts at perspective representation, such as another drawing by Smythson, this time of a skew-whiff house. However, the arrangement system means Palladio's drawing is placed awkwardly high. For those taking their children, you can tell them not to lose sleep over missing out on this one. However, shift your gaze down, and you'll find that the baseboard is mirrored. This has the effect of making the floor seem like an infinite plane, an effect which is amplified by a grid of yellow dots that Jacob has added onto the floor. In another room, the fun for all ages continues. Fifty objects fly towards and past the viewer on three projections cast onto walls in front and on either side of you. The objects follow lines of apparent linear perspective and create the sensation of hurtling through a drawing. To Jacob, who worked with game developer Shedworks for the exhibit, "it feels like experiencing a drawing through time." Here, the impact would be far greater had projections filled the floor and ceiling or virtual reality headsets been used. Jacob told AN that he explored the possibility of using the latter, but in the end, decided against it. A final room presents a collection of six books on perspective drawing, all from RIBA's rare books collection. Abraham Bosse's Mr. Desgargue's Universal Method of Practicing Perspective (1648) is opened up to show a drawing of three figures looking down with pyramids coming from their eyes and making a square on the floor: a view of their perspective, so to speak. Jacob, when showing AN around Disappear Here, argued that this depiction of perspective mimics the view from a modern-day military drone. Sadly, this connection isn't made in the actual show, and other ties to more contemporary takes on perspective, besides the collaboration with Shedworks, are awry. Jacob and Mortensen's insight into the history of perspective, intertwined with quirky illusory tricks, fails to exhibit work of any contemporary architecture firms. Jacob, who is more than aware of contemporary architectural techniques of representation, particularly collage, even noted that a few pasted people could turn one drawing into a typical piece from Portuguese firm Fala Atelier or architects Point Supreme from Greece. For all the allusion to progressing off the page and into the infinite, the supposed "power" of perspective, well documented in an essay by Jacob found inside the exhibition's leaflet, is also found wanting. Aside from the discombobulating decor, which does make Disappear Here fun to navigate, French architect Étienne-Louis Boullée's fantasy cathedral (see lead image) is the only piece that shows audiences the awe-inspiring power of scale and perspective at work. Superstudio's arguably most famous conception, Il Destino del Monumento Continuo (Destiny of the Continuous Moment), would fit nicely here. It, along with other works from Superstudio and other Italian radicals of the era, however, can be found at the Canadian Center for Architecture in Montreal where Utopie Radicali: Florence 1966–1976 is currently on view. For more exercises in disorientation, Sean Griffiths, a co-founder alongside Jacob of now defunct British studio FAT, has also been exploring perspective techniques in London and Folkestone.
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Architect Neave Brown, champion of social housing, passes away at 88

Neave Brown, English architect and outspoken proponent of low-rise, high-density public housing, has died at age 88 on January 9th. A New York native, Brown left permanently for London to study at the Architectural Association in the mid-1950’s. Known for his work in concrete, Brown’s open, stepped post-war developments demonstrated that high-quality, mass public housing was possible on the scale of London’s existing Victorian row houses. Brown is the only architect to have all of his UK projects listed, a protected status in which a building may not be demolished, expanded, or altered without express permission from the local planning authority. These projects include Dartmouth Park, the Dunboyne Road Estate, and the Alexandra Road Estate, the 1968 brutalist housing complex for which he is perhaps best known. Despite retiring in 2002, Brown’s work has continued to be recognized. Only two months ago, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) awarded Brown the 2018 Royal Gold Medal, acknowledging his lifetime of achievement in architecture. Advocating for a “social housing” model that emphasized communal living and fostering interaction between neighbors, Brown was vocally opposed to high-rise public estates. With the Grenfell Tower fire tragedy and demolition of Robin Hood Gardens fresh in the public’s mind, Brown had been scheduled to host a debate on social housing in February later this year.
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2018 RIBA Royal Gold Medal awarded to Neave Brown, social housing pioneer

Today the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) announced Neave Brown as the recipient of the 2018 Royal Gold Medal. The medal, approved personally by Queen Elizabeth II, recognizes a lifetime of achievement in the field of architecture, and is considered to be the highest honor an architect can receive in the U.K. Past recipients have included Zaha Hadid, Oscar Niemeyer, Rem Koolhaas, and Frank Lloyd Wright. Upon learning he would receive the lauded prize, Brown remarked, "All my work! I got it just by flying blind, I seem to have been flying all my life." Such a prolific career as Brown's might seem a blur in retrospect, but his achievements are numerous. The New York–born architect, now 88 years old, is best known for his housing complexes in the UK. His most famous structure, the Alexandra Road Estate near London's Abbey Road (completed in 1978), features a Brutalist ziggurat of concrete, tiered apartment buildings obscuring the sound and vibrations of an adjacent railway. The lush grounds of the estate, which contains 520 residential units, are also home to a large park, community center, and school. Another, earlier project at Winscombe Street (completed in 1963), took its inspiration from housing structures by modernists like Le Corbusier as well as traditional London terraces. It is a set of five houses built of concrete and brick with a communal garden attached. In signing on to live there, residents are obliged to sign an agreement Brown himself wrote up: They must participate in the garden's maintenance as well as occasional events hosted at the houses. As Brown wrote in the rules, the garden was meant to be a shared space whose "combination of freedom, community, and privacy is valuable and vulnerable," a social resource he took very seriously as a design element. The houses at Winscombe Street and the Alexandra Road Estate have been listed (landmarked) in the U.K, as well as a third housing project on Fleet Road (also a split-level structure with inward-facing terraces), completed in 1977. This makes Brown the only architect to have all his projects listed in the U.K. Explaining his nomination of Brown for the Royal Gold Medal, architectural historian Mark Swenarton said: "Brown has provided a model of an architecture that is not just outstanding in its form but is thoroughly rooted both in the social relationships that it supports and in the urban tissue that it reinforces." At the ripe age of 73, Brown retired from architectural work to pursue a Bachelors in fine art, a passion he put aside at 20 years old for a career in design. With this medal, the entire architectural world has a reminder of his contributions to the field, and to thinking about social housing writ large.
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In London, a new exhibition speculates on the future of Rome

On view at the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in London is When in Rome - A Collective Reflection on the Eternal City. The exhibition combines two previous shows, Re-Constructivist Architecture, which was at New York's Ierimonti Gallery, and Unbuilt Rome, which was on view at CAMPO in Rome. Both shows closed earlier this year, but are re-opened together in this show. Curated by Jacopo Costanzo, Giulia Leone and Valentino Danilo Matteis, When in Rome exhibits 22 projects from 19 architecture firms and designers from around the world who have all plunged into Rome's past to reframe an architectural future for the city. As a testament to their united vision, the two previous exhibits' convergence at RIBA allows two strands of speculative approaches to architectural intervention in Rome to be viewed in unison. It becomes evident that fundamentally they speak the same language—be it an abstraction or adaptation of the past or a reaction to it. Fitting in 22 projects is no mean feat. Like Re-constructivist Architecture did at the Ierimonti Gallery, projects fill the three walls. However, RIBA's "Practice Space," where the exhibition is located, does so on a larger scale. The extra space means that models—some of which could not be shown in New York—are afforded more room, though they cannot be viewed in the round. While the exhibits in New York and Rome placed the projects' accompanying texts at eye level, in the RIBA show, sometimes viewers are forced to crouch or craning their necks to read them. Aside from this, the means of conceptual representation in When in Rome sheds light on emerging trends in architectural representation. Collages and similar graphic methods are favored by most, with the projects from Re-constructivist Architecture using classical motifs or settings to engender a sense of identity and historical connection within new Roman architecture. In When in Rome, classical art and architecture is often abstracted to reimagine locales, producing artwork that riffs on this classical frame of reference. This can be seen with the work of Portuguese studio fala atelier, French firm jbmn architects, and False Mirror Office from Italy. Seeing the projects together makes it clear that the two exhibitions this show derives the work from converge well together. Projects such as Supervoid's adaptation of Adalberto Libera's never-realized Augustus Mausoleum and Shrine to the Fallen soldiers in East Africa and La Macchina Studio's Triumphal 17 fit well with the manifesto of Re-constructivist Architecture, despite both originally being for Unbuilt Rome. Despite the similarities between the works and themes in Re-constructivist Architecture and Unbuilt Rome, the projects are displayed separately, but without any markers separating them. The projects from "Unbuilt Rome" are bound together by Jacopo Valentini' photographs of the nine sites that never saw the presented projects constructed. Co-curator Jacopo Costanzo told The Architect's Newspaper (AN) that both of the exhibitions used Rome "as a theatre." He believes the array of projects could be seen as a sign of contemporary trends rather than as a unified movement. "The show at RIBA can present a sort of contemporary map of what it's going on in the generation of architects born in the 1980s," Costanzo added, noting that many architecture studios featured in When in Rome are young practices, with many based either in Italy or with experience working in the country.  When in Rome - A Collective Reflection on the Eternal City RIBA Practice Space 66 Portland Place, London, W1B 1AD Through October 8.
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RIBA unveils shortlist for 2017 Stirling Prize

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) announced its shortlist for this year’s best new building. From a photography studio to the British Museum’s latest addition, six buildings will be pitted against one another in their race to claim the top spot of RIBA’s 2017 Stirling Prize.

In its 22nd year, the prize is considered to be Britain’s most prestigious architecture award. The jury considers a range of criteria, including design vision, originality, capacity to stimulate, engagement with occupants and visitors, accessibility, sustainability, and the level of client satisfaction.

“This year’s shortlist typifies everything that is special about U.K. architecture: this is not just a collection of exceptionally well-designed buildings but spaces and places of pure beauty, surprise, and delight,” RIBA President Jane Duncan said in a press release.

The winner will be announced on October 31, 2017.

British Museum World Conservation and Exhibitions Centre Architect: Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners Structural Engineers: Ramboll M&E Engineers: Arup Acoustic Engineers: Arup Landscape Architects: Gillespies Lighting Design: Arup

Previous winners Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners (for Maggie’s Centre London in 2009 and Madrid's Barajas Airport in 2006) will be looking for their third win with their subterranean extension of the British institution, which includes conservation studios and a column-free exhibition hall that's almost 12,000 square feet in size.

City of Glasgow College - City Campus Architect: Reiach & Hall Architects and Michael Laird Architects Structural Engineer: Arup Landscape Architectrank: infraser landscape architecture M&E Engineer: FES with Hulley and Kirkwood Acoustics: ARUP Acoustics Interiors Graven Signage: Studio LR

Reiach & Hall Architects and Michael Laird Architects were shortlisted last year for the City of Glasgow College’s Riverside Campus. This year, their latest addition to the university is in the spotlight for both its immense scale and its restraint in material and form.

Hastings Pier Architect: dRMM Architects Structural Engineer: Ramboll UK Environmental / M&E Engineer: Ramboll UK Marine Engineers: Ramboll UK

Hasting’s newest seaside pier by firm dRMM Architects (who have been shortlisted twice before) is a revitalization success story of a decrepit pier turned into a vibrant public space through collaboration between community, engineers, and architects.

Command of the Oceans Architect: Baynes and Mitchell Architects M&E Engineer: Skelly & Couch Experiential Designer: Land Design Studio Structural & Civil Engineers: Price & Myers Lighting Design Studio: ZNA

Command of the Oceans is a redevelopment of the Chatham Historic Dockyard in Chatham, England. The transformation of a group of shipbuilding sheds into a new visitor attraction is bound together by a new, striking visitor hall entrance.

Barrett’s Grove Architect: Groupwork + Amin Taha Structural Engineers: Webb Yates Engineers M&E Engineers: Syntegra

A residential project, Barrett’s Grove features six apartments with wicker basket balconies that jut out onto the street. The building is built with timber and wrapped in perforated brick.

Photography Studio for Juergen Teller Architect: 6a architects Landscape Architects: Dan Pearson Studio Structural Engineers: Price & Myers M&E Engineers: Max Fordham LLP

The smallest project out of them all is by 6a architects, who exploited the narrow plot of land to create a sequence of three volumes for a flexible workspace. Light is brought in with interspersed courtyard gardens.

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The hidden story behind Mies van der Rohe’s unbuilt London skyscraper

A unique exhibition opened last week at the RIBA in London that compares schemes from two of the most iconic architects of the 20th Century: Mies van der Rohe and James Stirling.

The exhibition, titled Mies van der Rohe & James Stirling: Circling the Square, takes a look at the unrealized Mansion House Square proposal by the former that was succeeded 20 years later by James Stirling's newly listed No. 1 Poultry scheme. Sited in central London, Mies's modernist proposal (a stylistic antonym of what was actually erected) drew ire from the public and monarchy, though the story, up until now, has likely been a mystery to those not old enough to know of its existence.

The exhibition is the first time the public has been able to compare and contrast the two architects’ responses to a tricky site. The curators of the exhibition—Marie Bak Mortensen, head of exhibitions and Vicky Wilson, assistant curator, RIBA—have spent the last two-and-half years researching and sourcing a vast collection of photography, drawings, models, articles, and artifacts. Speaking to The Architect's Newspaper, they said their motivation behind the exhibition was to "dig behind the official story," fraught with controversy and public opinion, to expose the architecture beneath.

Mortensen and Wilson, the original designers of the RIBA architecture gallery, have returned to design an exhibition consisting of steel, stained wood, and floating tables. A 1:96 scale model of the Mansion House scheme dominates the exhibition, which was used as a marketing tool to impress the public ten years after the passing of Mies himself. The highly detailed model of a proposal which was once dubbed a "glass stump" by Prince Charles, has been restored back its former glory. 

During its ascension into the public mainframe, the focal point of opposition to the scheme did not pertain to the scale of the 18 story tower of glass and bronze, but rather the vast public space proposed beneath and around. It is a public space which would be cherished today, yet in the 1960s it was seen as space which could incite unrest—a notion particularly toxic amid the wave of IRA terrorism in the UK. Circling the Square tells the story of the tumultuous 40-year journey of the site, culminating in the completion of No. 1 Poultry which went up in 1997, five years after Stirling's death. 

Mies van der Rohe & James Stirling: Circling the Square runs through June 25 and is on show at The Architecture Gallery, RIBA, 66 Portland Place, London.

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RIBA names three new Fellows from the Midwest

The Royal Institute of British Architects has named 30 new RIBA Fellows, three of which are based in the U.S. Midwest and one based in New York. Fellows are chartered members of RIBA who are recognized for the significant contribution to the profession. RIBA Fellows represent a wide range of practitioners and academics from around the world. RIBA calls their Fellows “ambassadors for the profession and RIBA community.” This year's U.S.-based Fellows are New York-based Page Ayres Cowley, FRIBA, FAIA, Milwaukee-based Dr. Robert Greenstreet, FRIBA, PhD, FRSA, Int. Assoc. AIA, DPASCA, Pittsburgh-based Dr. Khee Poh Lam, FRIBA, and Kansas-based Peter Magyar, FRIBA, CAHA. Page Ayres Cowley is an architect whose work in conservation and historic preservation has earned her multiple national awards. She has also served on the AIA NY Chapter Historic Building Committee and the Sir John Soan’s Museum Foundation. Dr. Robert Greenstreet has been the recipient of the AIA Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architectural Education for his continued work as the Dean of the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee School of Architecture and Urban Planning. He is also the Director of the Department of Planning and Design in Milwaukee. His work focuses on leadership within the profession, as well as policy within a green economy. Dr. Khee Poh Lam is noted for his continued work in architectural technology. Poh played a key role in designing the National Library Building, Singapore, the first buildings to win the Singapore Building and Construction Authority’s Green Mark Platinum Award. He also sits on the Board of Directors of the Energy Foundation, an organization dedicated to educating business and community leaders, policy-makers, and the public about the benefits of a clean energy economy. Peter Magyar is involved with architectural leadership around the world. He sits on the Boards of AIA Pennsylvania, AIA Florida, and AIA Kansas. He was also a founding director of the first professional degree for architecture at the Florida Atlantic University, a school dedicated to providing architectural education to underprivileged students. “The community of RIBA Fellows highlights an incredible range of individuals and their many differing contributions to architecture—a desire to support, influence, and affect change, whether on a local, national or international scale,” stated Jane Duncan, RIBA President. “Fellows of the RIBA have demonstrated and continue to demonstrate the great importance and impact of their contributions which affect and influence change in the profession that advances architecture.”
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“Modern day Machu Picchu” wins RIBA’s first International Prize

Lauded as a "modern day Machu Picchu" by judges, Irish firm Grafton Architects has won the inaugural RIBA International Prize for their Universidad de Ingeniería y Tecnología (University of Engineering and Technology, known as "UTEC") building in Peru. The Dublin-based practice saw off competition from Zaha Hadid Architects, Foster+Partners, David Chipperfield, Nicholas Grimshaw, Shigeru Ban, and this year's RIBA Stirling Prize winner Caruso St John.

"Grafton Architects have created an innovative new model for a university campus that is highly responsive to its local environment and community," said RIBA president Jane Duncan. "The concept of a ‘vertical campus’ defies convention, as does the mix of open and enclosed spaces, but both are key to the success of this building visually and spatially."

The Dublin firm worked alongside local studio Shell Arquitectos on the design for UTEC, which echoes South American brutalist vernacular and the dramatic topography of the site. Contrary to its external aesthetic, the building is home to a myriad of open and visually connected spaces (especially circulatory ones) that work in tandem with the site's climate. In fact, the only closed spaces are classrooms, offices, laboratories, lecture theaters, seminar rooms, and toilets. As a result, campus social life can take place in the open air, encased by terracing yet on display to those passing through. UTEC officially opened in April 2015 and, according to RIBA, it is the "culmination of years of spatial and formal experimentation by Grafton Architects."

RIBA's "International Prize" is the first from the architectural body that is open to any qualified architect in the world. This year's jury saw esteemed architects Richard Rogers and Kunlé Adeyemi form a five member strong judging panel. According to RIBA, the new prize is "awarded to the most transformative building of the year which demonstrates visionary, innovative thinking, excellence of execution, and makes a distinct contribution to its users and to its physical context."

UTEC was selected as the winner of the 2016 RIBA International Prize from the following outstanding shortlisted entries:

  • Arquipelago Contemporary Arts Centre, Menos é Mais, Arquitectos Associados with João Mendes Ribeiro Arquitecto, Lda
  • Heydar Aliyev Centre, Zaha Hadid Architects with DiA Holding
  • Museo Jumex, David Chipperfield Architects with Taller Abierto de Arquitectura y Urbanismo (TAAU)
  • Stormen Concert Hall, Theatre and Public Library, DRDH Architects
  • The Ring of Remembrance, International WWI Memorial of Notre-Dame-de-Lorette, Agence d’architecture Philippe Prost (AAPP)

The awarding jury also made the following (collective) comments:

Sitting on the border of two residential districts in Lima, in section UTEC perches tantalizingly on the edge of a ravine. Seen from across the ravine it is as bold and as pure a statement of the symbiosis between architecture and engineering as could be imagined; a piece of geology imposed on its pivotal site, mirroring the organic curve of the landscape and accommodating itself in the city. To its close neighbours, it is a series of landscaped terraces with clefts, overhangs and grottos, a modern day Machu Picchu. UTEC has been designed to encourage its students to interact in a unique way with the building. The vertical structure provides open circulation and meeting spaces in a succession of platforms that compose the ‘frame’ of the building; teaching rooms, laboratories and offices are enclosed, inserted into and suspended from the exposed concrete structure. The frame is a device providing shade, a place of rich spatial exuberance and a platform from which to view the life of the city. The entire life of this vertical campus is on full display to the people of Lima. UTEC is the culmination of years of experimentation by Grafton Architects. In this building they show the mastery of their craft, gifting Lima with a bold yet considerate contribution to the city and a visionary, world-class building.

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RIBA unveils the 2016 Stirling Prize shortlist

The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) has announced this years Stirling Prize shortlist. Comprising six builds from six firms, the winners will be crowned on October 6 this year for what is Britain's most prestigious architecture award. Up for nomination are London firm Wilkinson Eyre who could potentially win their third Stirling Prize, something which is yet to be achieved. Their project, a conversion of Oxford University’s Grade 1 listed Weston Library joins Swiss firm Herzog and de Meuron's for the university, the Blavatnik School of Government. Making up three projects in the education sector (half of the shortlist), is the City of Glasgow College riverside campus from Michael Laird Architects and Reiach & Hall. The sector appears to be a good source of architectural prowess as last year, Burntwood School in South London by AHMM won the award. London practice dRMM and and Cardiff-based studio Loyn & Co received recognition two residential projects: Trafalgar Place, a complex part of the Elephant & Castle redevelopment in South London, and Inside Outside House, a dwelling in the Forest of Dean, Southeast Wales. Loyn & Co's private residency is the first to make the shortlist in 15 years and is also in the running for RIBA's House of the Year Award. The final addition to the list, but by no means the least worthy, is another London firm, Caruso St. John who make their second appearance on the shortlist. This time they're up for nomination courtesy of their brick-heavy facade Newport Street Gallery in Vauxhall, London for British artist Damien Hirst which features an elegant wooden spiral staircase. Judging this years entries will be Patrik Schumacher of ZHA; Paul Monaghan of last year's winning firm AHMM; Roisin Heneghan of Heneghan and Peng; Michael Hussey, Fellow of the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors; and Rachel Whiteread, a renowned British sculptor who won the Turner Prize in 1993.
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RIBA takes a look at Britain’s house of tomorrow in latest exhibition

Opening today, the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) in London is hosting a new exhibition At Home in Britain: Designing the House of Tomorrow. Focusing on three typologies: cottages, terraced housing and flats, the exhibition will critique vernacular housing trends of the past while addressing contemporary issues such as affordability, housing density and shared living. Making use of RIBA's extensive architectural archives, a diverse selection of six practices, divided into groups of two for each typology were commissioned with each producing projects and case studies specific to the task. The exhibition also ties in with the British pavilion at this years Venice Biennale titled Home Economics led by Shumi Rose, Jack Self and Finn Williams. Tackling the cottage typology, London studio Jamie Fobert Architects, who also designed the exhibition, looks at how plot sizes needn't be an issue in the 21st Century when considering low-cost countryside dwelling. "The ability to have your own piece of land hasn't really changed," said Fobert at a press preview. His exhibit which features an extensive site model of the Ailesbury East development, also criticizes the disparity between suburban housing that has been "dropped" into village contexts citing how 58 percent of space is tarmac. Also focusing on cottages is French firm, Maison Edouard François. François best known for his Flower Tower project focuses his study on a site by the Orly Airport just outside of Paris. Despite being destined for demolition, François advocated the site's reuse calling for individuality in his low-rise housing scheme. Taking on terraces are London firms vPPR and Mæ. Led by Alexy Ely, the firm has put together an interactive exhibit that encourages people to design their own terrace choosing from a selection of floor plans and facades factoring in lifestyle and budget. vPPR on the other hand take a look at how party walls, instead of separating, can unify residents in terraced housing. Tatiana von Preussen, one of the founding trio of female architects at the firm explained how recreational space doesn't always have to be secluded and private, using a 1:50 axonometric drawing and mirrored styrofoam 3D model to highlight the possibility of shared spaces. Here, von Preussen argues that as more people are working from home, a collective office space could be a future possibility while stressing that vPPR's proposal did not "impose" communal living, saying that the process would be "organic". On to the final typology of the flat and Dutch firm Mecanoo has put together a large wooden cuboid scale model aimed to demonstrate how different lifestyles can coexist in the same structure. Of all the practices, their work relies most heavily on RIBA's collections. Their exhaustive study showcases sections from Denys Lasdun's "ziggurat" halls of residence at the University of East Anglia and Peter Cook's competition submission for a block of flats on Roosevelt Island in New York. However, their primary inspiration derives from the floor plans of Britain's country estates, as can seen with Ragley Hall, where a central atrium serves as the buildings focal point and communal hub. Finally, Studio Weave from London take the most abstract approach. Their quirky exhibit chronologically looks at how housing was sold to public. Using this, they have put together a series of hypothetical adverts for the housing of the future - or of 2025 to be precise. The posters, baring a resemblance to Match.com's recent exposure in London, feature phrases such as "Meet your emergency dog walker" and "Meet your supermarket sidekick" envisioning a future where communal living is an in demand asset.