Posts tagged with "Museum of the City of New York":

Making Room: New York Micro-Apartments on Display Beginning January 23

Think you could live in just 325 square feet? While Manhattan is already famous for its cramped quarters, micro-apartments are poised to take space efficiency to the next level with Murphy beds lurking behind sofas and roll-away walls concealing closets. You'll have a chance to test drive one of the tiny abodes at a new exhibition, Making Room: New Models for Housing New Yorkers, organized by the Museum of the City of New York and the Citizens Housing & Planning Council. Opening on January 23, the exhibition will include a full-scale, furnished mock-up of a micro-apartment, highlighting the changing ways city-dwellers live, especially as more and more choose to live alone. The sample unit will feature highly adaptable furniture by companies such as Resource Furniture that makes a micro-apartment lifestyle possible. Making Room will also unveil the top designs for Mayor Michael Bloomberg's adAPT micro-apartment design competition, showcasing proposals from various architects and developers for what will eventually be New York's first entirely micro-apartment building on East 27th Street. Organizers are also hosting an exclusive opening party the day before the exhibition opening, Tuesday, January 22, from 6:00 to 8:00 pm at the Museum of the City of New York, where you might see Honorary Exhibition Chair and New York City Planning Chair Amanda Burden, who has been vocally delighted with the concept.  Making Room runs through September 2013.

On View> From Farm to City: Staten Island 1616–2012

From Farm to City: Staten Island 1616–2012 Museum of the City of New York 1220 Fifth Avenue Through January 21, 2013 From Farm to City: Staten Island 1616–2012 explores the history, evolution, and future of New York’s often overlooked fifth borough. The island has served as the city’s breadbasket, a pastoral escape for the city’s elite, an industrial center, an international port, and a toehold for new immigrant communities. Divided into four sections—Farms, Pleasure Grounds, Suburbs, and City—the exhibition examines the major forces that have shaped land use on the island, including the development of the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge. The exhibition includes historic photographs, maps, and other ephemera and objects, as well as an online mapping component tracing the chronology of major developments on the island.

Slideshow> Revamped Seaport Museum Opens: Old Salts Meet Occupy Wall St.

A revamped South Street Seaport Museum shook off the dust last night to reopen after a three-month renovation overseen by the Museum of the City of New York. The exhibits were both a departure from and an embrace of the old collection.  The design team, particularly Wendy Evans Joseph and Chris Cooper of Cooper Joseph Studio, turned what could have been a cramped exhibition arrangement into a free-flowing multi-leveled space. Some of the contemporary elements might strike a design-conscious audience as familiar. A very large segment of the exhibition space is devoted to contemporary furnishings designed and "Made in New York," feeling a bit like an ICFF satellite. A fashion component adds a dash of Fifth Avenue flair. MCNY's curator of architecture and design Donald Albrecht noted that the port was always about moving goods and "making." Much of the work assembled in the show is manufactured in Brooklyn warehouses that once serviced the maritime trade but have since been repurposed for an ever-expanding design industry. A few standouts were Daniel Michalik's recycled cork chaise lounge from 2006 and designer David Nosanchuk's multi-faceted Plexiglas lamp, the NR1.  Nosanchuk's piece represents a rarity these days in that it was both designed and manufactured in Manhattan.  With all the ship-making tools painstakingly arranged on angled white plane in the gallery next door, the "making" tradition becomes abundantly clear.  Less clear is whether the inclusion of contemporary fashion makes the same seamless leap. Still, fashion designer Jordon Betten's installation of a lost waif in a part of the museum building that originally housed the Sweet's Hotel (1870-1920) provides a stirring contrast to the decayed rafters. Some older exhibits from MCNY made the trip downtown, including Eric Sanderson's Manahatta, which includes a three dimensional map of Mahattan with an overhead projector that digitally morphs the terrain from natural wetlands and forests of 1650 to today's dense street grid. There's also a tight ensemble of Edward Burtynsky photographs. Burtynsky's images of Bangladeshi shipbreakers dismantling once powerful ships for scrap metal provide an unexpected smack of mortality. Another gallery calls attention to "The New Port" with a time-lapse video by digital artist Ben Rubin called Terminal 8 that focuses on of arrivals and departures of American Airlines jets at JFK. But as the gallery prominently features American Airlines corporate brand it's difficult to see the artistic forest through the commercial trees, a fact made all the more jarring by the Occupy Wall Street photo exhibition just two galleries away. The Occupy segment of the exhibit is perhaps the biggest stroke of marketing smarts on the part of MCNY that might just distract tourists from the ghoulish "Bodies" exhibit across the street and bring them back into a New York state of mind. The Occupy gallery was packed on opening night. It added a cool factor that can't be quantified.  The exhibit itself recalls the Here is New York show that opened in Soho about a month after the 9/11 attacks and later toured around the world. The photos celebrate, engage, and provoke, much like the demonstrations. Not a bad metaphor for the city at large or the new management.

On View> The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan

The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan, 1811–2011 Museum of the City of New York 1220 Fifth Avenue Through April 6, 2012 In 1807, to head off health threats and a growing lack of habitable space, New York City’s Common Council commissioned a three-year project to organize massive land development north of Houston Street. The Museum of the City of New York presents The Greatest Grid: The Master Plan of Manhattan, 1811–2011 in honor of the bicentennial of the 1811 Commissioners’ Plan for New York, which established the iconic street grid from Houston to 155th Street. Along with the original, hand-drawn map of New York’s grid plan, other historic documents demonstrate the city’s physical development due to the grid’s application and evolution over time. Co-presented by the Museum of the City of New York, the New York Public Library, and The Architectural League of New York, and sponsored by the Office of the Manhattan Borough President, The Greatest Grid will be on display until April 6. Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow.

On View> The American Style: Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis

The American Style: Colonial Revival and the Modern Metropolis Museum of the City of New York 1220 Fifth Avenue Through October 30 Following the U.S. Centennial of 1876, architecture in New York City was defined by what was known as “the American style,” a visual language referencing both the nation’s nostalgia for its beginnings and its progressive aspirations. A new exhibition reveals the impact of Colonial Revival on the cityscape through vintage photographs and objects like a 1926 mahogany settee by the Company of Master Craftsmen, whose volutes reflect a resurgence in classicism that is the trademark of the Colonial.  

AN Video> Viñoly on Postmodernism, etc.

AN's Julie Iovine held a freewheeling conversation last week with architect Rafael Viñoly under the subject heading "What Comes After Postmodern Architecture." The architect had some choice words about the period before moving on to a variety of other topics, including corporate architecture, collaboration, and New York. https://vimeo.com/22260678

Event> What Comes After Postmodern Architecture?

  • What Comes After Postmodern Architecture? A Conversation with Rafael Viñoly
  • Museum of the City of New York
  • 1220 Fifth Avenue at 103rd Street
  • New York
  • Tuesday, April 5 at 6:30pm
Join Julie Iovine, executive editor at The Architect's Newspaper, tomorrow (Tuesday) evening for a compelling discussion with architect Rafael Viñoly at the Museum of the City of New York at 6:30pm. The topic for the night, "What Comes After Postmodern Architecture?", will tackle the state of New York City architecture. The recent building boom in New York City has radically altered the look and feel of the city and added considerably to the list of starchitects currently reshaping New York’s iconic skyline. It has also helped redefine boundaries of the eclectic pluralism of postmodern architecture. How do we label the current architectural style of the last decade? Is there a post-postmodern? Reservations required. Call 917-492-3395 or purchase tickets online through MCNY. Tickets: $12 for non-members, $8 for seniors & students, $6 for museum members.

Drinking in History

Last night, the Museum of the City of New York hosted the first installment of their summer long prohibition-era themed parties on the newly renovated Polshek Partnership-designed terrace overlooking Central Park.Though not so secret, the Museum’s Speakeasy was complete with Roaring 20’s music and old-fashioned cocktails that were commonly seen on old New York City menus during Prohibition, including the Manhattan, the Bronx, and my personal favorite Planter’s Punch.
Recipe Courtesy City Room: 2 ounces dark rum ¼ ounce grenadine Equal parts sour mix and either pineapple or orange juice to fill Club soda (optional) Maraschino cherry for garnish Lemon or orange slice for garnish
The Speakeasy at 1220 Fifth will be open every Wednesday night from 6-9pm through August 26th. Admission is $12 ($10 for members) and includes one free drink and access to the Museum’s first floor galleries where you can view the Mannahatta/Manhattan exhibit. Be sure to stop by and tell them The Architect’s Newspaper sent you!

Decor Out the Door

In addition to their scholarly and artistic value, many historic houses and period rooms are the rescues of the nascent preservation movement. On view since 1938 at the Museum of the City of New York (MCNY), two 1880s Aesthetic Movement rooms from the Rockefeller Mansion on 54th Street are finding new homes at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and at the Virginia Commonwealth Museum. MCNY deaccessioned the rooms as a part of its renovation, led by Polshek Partnership. The dressing room will go to the Met, as a part of their chronological sequence of period rooms, currently being reinstalled. The bedroom will go to Virginia, the home state of Catherine Arabella Duvall Yarrington Worsham, the woman who commissioned the firms Pottier & Stymus and Sypher & Co. to design the rooms. Shortly after their completion, Worsham sold the house to John D. Rockefeller, who kept the interiors intact. In 1937, John D. Rockefeller Jr. gave the two rooms to MCNY and a third to the Brooklyn Museum.