Posts tagged with "Michael Maltzan Architecture":

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Allied Works, Michael Maltzan, and Studio Gang compete for California College of the Arts campus design

Allied Works Architecture (AWA), Michael Maltzan Architects (MMA), and Studio Gang Architects (SGA) have been selected as finalists to design a new campus for California College of the Arts (CCA). The architects are vying to design a new extension to the school’s San Francisco campus that would unify the institute’s 2,000 students, 600 faculty, 250 staff members and 34 academic programs on one site. Currently, CCA’s students and programs are split between a campus in San Francisco and one in nearby Oakland, California. The new campus expansion would grow on a 2.4-acre lot bordering the existing facilities in San Francisco and would be developed over the following five years. The project also aims to address San Francisco’s housing crisis by supplying roughly 1,000 beds of on- or near-campus housing by 2025, a healthy increase over the 500 currently available beds split between the two existing campuses. The expansion will have a heavy emphasis on sustainable design practices, with the college citing the inclusion of sustainability strategies for water and energy generation, usage, and conservation, air quality, and environmentally safe art-making materials and practices as central tenets of the expansion. CCA will also engage in an effort to preserve the school’s current Oakland campus, which dates back to 1922. The university aims to redevelop that property, the historic Treadwell Estate, in a way that might “reflect and amplify CCA's legacy,” including, potentially, some sort of “mission-aligned” use like affordable housing or as the location of an educational institution. The planned expansion comes after several years of architect-guided planning at CCA, with architectural firms Gensler and MKThink producing a strategic framework for planning for the campus in 2015 that was followed by year-long comment period seeking to engage professors and students, alumni, and trustees. Following the comment period, San Francisco—based Jensen Architects created a space-planning guide from the Gensler and MKThink report that was then used to vet potential architecture firms, with the resulting selection of AWA, MMA, and SGA indicating the school is ready to move onto the next phase of fielding proposals from each team. In a press release announcing the finalists’ selection, CCA President Stephen Beal stated, “This is the moment for CCA to elevate and scale our distinctive, learn-through-making educational model by unifying our campuses to improve the student experience. We will develop future creative leaders and reimagine higher education on a campus like no other—one built with advanced measures of sustainability where every workspace, public space, and landscape serves as a living, learning laboratory for collaboration, risk-taking, and experimentation. We are looking forward to finding a partner architectural firm that can help us realize this vision.”
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Michael Maltzan Architects designs exhibition for Huntington Library

  The exhibition, Lari Pittman: Mood Books, with works by artist Lari Pittman and exhibition design by Michael Maltzan Architecture (MMA), is currently on view at the Huntington Library and Botanical Gardens in San Marino, California. Pittman is a Los Angeles—based visual artist who makes large-scale paintings that combine surrealism, geometric shapes, and narrative association with vivid color. The artist’s paintings vary widely in terms of size and scale and alternate between collections of single and multiple works. The exhibition on view features a collection of Pittman’s smaller recent works: six art-books containing a bound collection of 65 paintings by the artist, with the books resting on large pedestals designed by MMA. The tomes, styled in the manner of psychedelia-inspired illuminated manuscripts, are located in a dark, ancillary gallery and are removed from the museum’s permanent collection. Within that space, the books and their respective pedestals are organized in a straight line, with books open for viewing along alternating sides of the heavily articulated, painted plywood arrangement. MMA’s designs for the pedestals are articulated as stark-white, billowing forms, rendered in sumptuous planes with surface qualities halfway between those sheets of a paper and billowing drapery. Each pedestal is supported by four diminutive legs, where the form of each supported volume swoops down to touch the floor. Like sliced up milk cartons, the pedestals unfold and bend backward, connecting with adjacent pedestals to create one monolithic object. A light-gauge curved rod spans between the open section of each pedestal along the viewing edge, guarding Pittman’s works. A wall-based work on a touchscreen hangs, off in a the corner of the room, the small painting illuminated and pushed out from the wall by an exaggerated, extruded picture frame. The pages of each book will be turned throughout the course of the exhibition and all the sheets are accessible via the touch screen component. For more information on Mood Books, visit the Huntington Library website.
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“Rock Day L.A.” turns Sixth Street Bridge rubble into memorabilia

Celebrating a peculiar form preservation, Los Angeles City Councilmember José Huizar and the Los Angeles Bureau of Engineering will be teaming up on August 13th to host “Rock Day L.A.,” an event focused around handing out roughly 1,000 pieces of the iconic Sixth Street Bridge, currently under demolition. The event, held as part of the City's effort to keep the public engaged with the $449 million project, will feature live music and food as officials hand out free chunks of the structure on a first-come, first-served basis. Each piece will be accompanied by a certificate of authenticity. The event, hosted on a Saturday morning to ensure public access, will mark another milestone in the Sixth Street Bridge’s replacement, as crews have spent the last six months methodically deconstructing one of L.A.’s most iconic structures. Built in 1932 using an innovative-for-the-time, on-site concrete manufacturing plant, the Sixth Street Bridge was eventually found to be suffering from Alkali-Silica Reaction (ASR), commonly referred to as "concrete cancer." ASR is a malady that occurs when concrete is made with too much alkali content, setting off a chemical reaction between that alkali content and the concrete’s aggregate, resulting in a gel-like substance that weakens the structure. This chemical byproduct creates stress within the concrete itself, resulting in a brittle material that, given L.A.’s seismically active history, has the potential to cause catastrophic failure. The bridge was designated as a public safety hazard in 2011 when the Bureau of Engineering estimated that there was a 70% chance the bridge could collapse in a major earthquake over the next 50 years. The following year, an international design competition was held afterward to design a replacement. The Sixth Street Bridge will be replaced by a HNTB and Michael Maltzan Architecture-designed structure that evokes the Art Deco original with its cascade of swoopy, cable-stayed supports. The new structure, due to be finished in 2019, will feature an array of public parks, plazas, and connections to the city’s Los Angeles River, which is also currently undergoing radical change and restoration.
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Michael Maltzan designs a new arts center for Rice University that fits the campus’s distinctive form

A new building now under construction, the Moody Center for the Arts, designed by Los Angeles architect Michael Maltzan, continues the exploration of how to design new buildings for Rice University that respect and consider rather than imitate the existing buildings.

According to Maltzan, the parti for the Moody Center—which will house workshops, galleries, and performance spaces for an interdisciplinary arts center—is a “hyper village of making; a microcosm of the campus itself.”

Rice University’s campus in Houston is one of the most compelling in the United States. Its original master plan was devised by Boston architect Ralph Adams Cram in 1909 and is characterized by a series of parallel, narrow buildings. It has, at least in spirit, been a consistent guiding force for more than 100 years. Not only did Cram devise a building typology, but he also created a formal language for the entire campus based on a particular set of materials, like Lovett Hall (1912) with its orange St. Joe Brick made in Louisiana from bayou clay, pink Texas granite, and gray Ozark marble and exotic inspiration, Adriatic Italian Byzantine architecture of the medieval era.

Maltzan says he was struck by the physical sensations of being on the campus. A massive grove of live oaks—planted at the time of the college’s foundation—forms allées between the buildings and is green year round. It hovers over the flat campus, and defines space architecturally as much as the buildings.

In his scheme, Maltzan figuratively pushed together the long, bar-like buildings and the landscaped spaces between them to “exaggerate the intensity of spaces.” The irregular mass of smaller classrooms and workshops interspersed with larger galleries and theaters will be clad in a charcoal gray brick colored with shimmery magnesium oxide that changes in appearance from light to dark, much as the tree canopy does throughout the day. These brick walls, which are mostly solid except for large, strategically placed openings for day lighting, will be raised one story above the ground. The ground level will be entirely sheathed with clear glass, an echo of the clear sightlines through the tree trunks under the leafy canopy.

Although its radical appearance will be a big departure from the more conservative buildings near it, the Moody Center will hopefully become a valued landmark as the campus architecture of Rice University continues to evolve and adapt.

In recent years, there has been a subtle but palpable change apparent in the construction of key buildings like the Brochstein Pavilion (2009), designed by New York architecture firm Thomas Phifer + Partners, and the Brockman Hall for Physics (2011), designed by Philadelphia architects Kieran Timberlake. Both are fitted between existing buildings and use different strategies: one a glass box and the other raised on tapered pilotis to minimize the intrusion. With these two buildings, a new, a less literal interpretation of Cram’s master plan has emerged that enhances and expands the original intent.

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Michael Maltzan and Arup propose eco-friendly redesign of Pasadena’s Arroyo Seco Bridge

Freeways were never meant to be environmental saviors. However, Michael Maltzan Architecture (MMA), working with Arup Los Angeles, has other ideas. In a proposal that advocates for the green possibilities of freeways, MMA has outlined how the Arroyo Seco Bridge in Pasadena can serve the neighborhood in more ways than one. "What if we ask more of the Arroyo Bridge without compromising the integrity of the existing infrastructural efficiency? What if the bridge became an experiential and aesthetic asset for residents and visitors? What if we demand that the bridge do more?" MMA asked. The two firms suggest draping the tunnel in vegetation and topping it with photovoltaic cells. Part of State Route 134 of the Ventura Freeway, the bridge accommodates ten lanes of traffic and, in MMA's words, "is at odds with its context, polluting the surrounding neighborhoods with noise and vehicle emissions and simultaneously eroding the Arroyo landscape between the San Gabriel Mountains to the north and the Los Angeles River to the south." Storm water captured from the bridge canopy would irrigate the plants. The vegetation would also soak up the carbon emissions from traveling vehicles. Other design features would include: acoustically-insulated walls that would hamper noise pollution (transparent panels would preserve views to the Colorado Bridge to the south and the Rose Bowl to the north) and "porous concrete ‘lungs’" that would make use of photocatalytic concrete will improve air quality by removing pollutants—just in case the plants can't do their job. Envisioning an “environmental machine,” MMA said they aim to design a "solution that celebrates the experience of driving over the Arroyo Seco while sustainably integrating the freeway into its immediate context." MMA also hopes that their proposal inspires others to see the potential that freeways, or any major roadways for that matter, have for developing relationships between transportation agencies, local municipalities, and state agencies. "As an approach to infrastructure, these types of enhancements are not specific to the 134, but are expandable to other freeways," the firm said. This article was first mentioned in the Los Angeles Times.
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Rumors on changes to One Santa Fe are just internet hype

Like any responsible citizen, you too were probably surprised this week when the Los Angeles arm of The Real Deal published the sinisterly-titled article “Berkshire Group is renovating One Santa Fe to better ‘blend in’ with neighborhood.” That article speculated upon an earlier story published by Globe Street, where Eric Schrumpf, Senior Vice President of Acquisitions at Berkshire Group, the real estate investment management company that paid $200 million for One Santa Fe earlier this month, was quoted as saying, “We want the property to blend in with and remain true to the original nature of the Arts District.” Could Michael Maltzan Architecture’s 2014, 434-unit housing-as-infrastructure ground scraper on the far edge of L.A.’s Arts District be in line for a facelift? With the rapidly rising land values in the Arts District, the recent ground-breaking for a dull $215 million development across the street, and One Santa Fe’s short but provocative existence, it was not difficult for The Real Deal article to stir a pot of worry and cynicism in the internet community. After LA Observed published its own article, describing the quarter mile-long structure as “not very inviting,” Los Angeles Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne interpreted the news as a missive from the “be careful what you wish for dept.” over Twitter. It all turns out to simply be not a lot of hot air. When AN reached out to Michael Maltzan Architects and Berkshire Group for comment on the matter, we were met with a sort of bewilderment over the news. Michael Maltzan characterized the reports of large-scale changes to One Santa Fe as "greatly exaggerated" and “wishful thinking” to The Architect's Newspaper during a telephone interview while Schrumpf remarked via email, “We have no plans for any significant renovations or major changes to the asset.  I’m not sure where the information that was incorporated into some of the early articles came from, but it is not accurate.” Maltzan prefaced our conversation by stating “We’ve been in communication with Berkshire Group since they took over the building. As far as I know, there are no plans for significant changes to One Santa Fe” before describing the building as still in the process of coming fully online. It turns out some of the commercial spaces surrounding the new Hennessey and Ingalls bookstore needed basic maintenance, he said, reiterating, “the scale of the changes is small.”
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The end of the Los Angeles’ Sixth Street bridge brings a subdued HNTB-Maltzan design

So long, Sixth Street Bridge. We knew it was coming, but Wednesday marked the last day the iconic Art Deco span would be open to the public. Built in 1932, the iconic double-loop overpass over the L.A. River will live on in movies, videos, and photos. A victim of age, the bridge was declared unsalvageable due to irreversible decay in 2012 and the Bureau of Engineering launched a competition to design a new, $400 million, cable stayed structure. HNTB with Michael Maltzan Architecture came out the winners in that infrastructural bout and with the demise of the old bridge their loop-de-loop ten-arch span is one step closer to realization. The mayor’s office released new renderings of the bridge that look decidedly toned down from the 2012 winning boards. While older images depicted stairways built into the arches so that pedestrians could get an elevated view and the concrete embankments planted with wildflowers, updated renderings depict a staid park in the shade of the roadbed. that with the Developer Leonard Hill (a founding partner of Linear City Development) recently gave a $1.9 million gift to the Mayor’s Fund for Los Angeles. Those moneys were earmarked to fund the design, construction, and programming of an arts plaza beneath the new Sixth Street Bridge. With such a contribution, one might hope that the park space slated to open in 2019 will be more fully realized than the uninspired placeholder suggested in the renderings.
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Hammer Museum Announces Expansion into Occidental Petroleum Tower

A bigger Hammer is happening in Westwood. The museum just announced that the museum a 99-year lease and will be expanding into 40,000 square feet of gallery and support space. In addition to remaining in their existing building, they are taking over square footage in the first five floors of the adjoining mid-century office tower by Claud Beelman, who in addition to designing the 1962 Occidental Petroleum building created the Superior Oil Company headquarters (aka the downtown Standard Hotel) and the Art Deco Eastern Columbia Building in DTLA. The  property recently purchased by UCLA, which will occupy floors six through sixteen of the tower. New York architect Edward Larrabee Barnes designed the original Carrara marble-clad Hammer Museum building in the early 90s, but in the years since it’s been renovated several times by L.A.’s own Michael Maltzan. He designed the Billy Wilder Theater, the Museum Café, and most recently the John V. Tunney Bridge. The Hammer did not say if Maltzan would be participating in the expansion. “There could not be a more ideal situation than to share our building with UCLA, with whom we have such a long affiliation. We believe this is the best possible outcome for the museum; our missions are aligned, we have a strong working relationship, and share a long-term commitment to the students and community,” said museum director Ann Philbin. “We are excited about our future plans to expand, improve, and transform our space.” According to the Hammer press release, the additional space will not only allow for larger galleries, but for ones dedicated to the Hammer Contemporary Collection and works on paper. A new study center for the UCLA Grunwald Center Collection, a classroom, and support spaces will round out the new scheme. To pay for the expansion and upgrade, the museum received a $25 million cash payment to be invested in what the Hammer calls its “quasi-endowment.” A capital campaign will follow. No date was given for the opening of the improvements.
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Hennessey +Ingalls to move from Santa Monica to Michael Maltzan’s One Santa Fe in 2016

Hennessey + Ingalls is a rarity in an age when bookstores that survived the rise of Amazon are often indistinctive superstores or exercises in hipster curation. Los Angeles’ long-established mecca for art and architecture is neither. Fans were nervous when the store shuttered its Hollywood annex in Space Fifteen Twenty last spring. While the Santa Monica store on Wilshire and 2nd will close at the end of the year, it will reopen in a new space at One Santa Fe, the mixed-use development complex designed by Michael Maltzan Architecture. When Reginald Hennessey first set up the store in 1963, it catered to an up and coming community of artists, architects, and art enthusiasts. The tradition of stocking its wooden shelves with rare, sometimes out-of-print books has continued to enthrall readers from around Los Angeles and has even managed to attract the attention of design institutions from all over America. The family owned store was passed down from Reginald to his son and finally grandson, Brett, who now runs the business. He was responsible for computerizing the operations and increasing the store’s online presence. Initially based out of Santa Monica with a branch in Hollywood, the business had to close down the latter due to an increase in rent and a smaller customer base. The store, currently 8,000 square feet, is downsizing to a smaller, but better-located 5,000-square-foot location in the Arts District. “We were focusing on Downtown L.A. and crossed paths with Michael Maltzan. It just turned into a really good partnership because One Santa Fe is right up our alley. The curation of businesses there are kind of what we like most about it,” said Brett Hennessey. The bookstore anticipates a bigger customer base at its new location, located right across the street from SCI-Arc, a few minutes away from FIDM, and even close by to the University of Southern California. “People can drive in from 360 degrees around us. The problem with Santa Monica is that only half the side can drive to the store” quipped Hennessey. Hennessey + Ingalls will celebrate the last holiday season out of Santa Monica and will open its doors again in February 2016. This time in DTLA.
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Leong Leong selected to design Los Angeles LGBT Center in Hollywood

Leong Leong was selected to design the master plan and new buildings for the Los Angeles LGBT Center in Hollywood. The pair's resume includes fashion house Philip Lim as well as the design of the United States Pavilion of the 2014 Venice Architecture Biennale. The firm is known for using common materials in uncommon ways, with results that belie humble beginnings: a sleek facade composed of mirrored louver blinds, sound insulation foam transforms into a chic wallcovering. The new project is their biggest commission to date and includes a 183,700-square-foot facility and a campus plan that, with the existing building, covers more than a city block and includes 140 units of affordable housing for seniors and young adults, 100 beds for homeless youth, a new senior center, retail space, a center for homeless youth, and an administrative headquarters. The scheme will be centered on a series of courtyard spaces and plazas. The Los Angeles LGBT Center and housing developer Thomas Safran & Associates chose Leong Leong from a shortlist of five firms, which included Michael Maltzan, Frederick Fisher, Predock Frane, and MAD. The commission is a collaboration between the firm, executive architect Killefer Flammang Architects and landscape architect Pamela Burton. “The design concept is to create a mosaic of unique spaces and programs that—together with The Village at Ed Gould Plaza—will form a cohesive campus along McCadden Place. We hope the project will become an urban catalyst for the neighborhood, connecting residents, clients, staff, and neighbors alike,” says Chris Leong.
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Gimme Shelter: Inaugural A+D Museum exhibition promises to rethink Los Angeles housing

Opening August 20, Shelter: Rethinking How We Live in Los Angeles, the inaugural exhibition at the A+D Museum's new Arts District space presents works by architects and designers that challenge and improve upon L.A. housing typologies. The single-family house has long been the touchstone for experimental architecture in Los Angeles, from the Case Study Houses to Gehry’s own home in Santa Monica, replete with (now-removed) domesticated chain-link fencing. But as the cost of real estate puts pressure on residential architecture, new solutions for single- and multi-family housing are desperately needed. Curators Sam Lubell and Danielle Rago invited local practices to develop proposals for the Wilshire Corridor and along the Los Angeles River, these include Bureau Spectacular, LA Más, Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects, MAD Architects, PAR, and wHY Architecture. (Editor's Note: Both Lubell and Rago are regular contributors to AN, and Lubell is AN's former West Coast editor.) Works by Kevin Daly Architects, Michael Maltzan Architects, Bestor Architecture, OMA, R&A, and Koning Eizenberg, will also be on view. AN spoke with the curators. The title is Shelter, the absolute basis for architecture, but what does it mean to “rethink how we live” and why is this reassessment so pressing right now? Sam Lubell: LA is going through monumental changes, re-embracing density, transit, and the public realm while facing unprecedented challenges around affordability, the environment, and congestion. But while the city has always been a center for residential innovation, most residential architecture here today does not properly respond to the changes taking place. We're hoping to help spur a dialogue about reshaping our housing and our lifestyles to today's realities. It’s a great line up of practices in the show. What were your criteria for selecting participants? Danielle Rago: The show features [six new proposals] by Los Angeles design practices—each occupies a different position in the field of architecture. Yet, we believe all approach residential design in interesting and innovative ways. SL: We also wanted a mix of emerging and established firms, and practice-oriented and research-oriented firms. We think it's a great mix, full of energy, creativity, and some surprise. How did the designers address some of Los Angeles’ hot button topics: density, affordability, accessibility, and sustainability? SL: The designers have done an excellent job addressing several of these issues. wHY, for instance, tackled both density and affordability by proposing new configurations of development in underused, residual public spaces along Wilshire Boulevard. LOHA tackled environmental issues by creating homes that utilize the aquifers near the L.A. River to capture and store water. And MAD has created a new type of outdoor living within a dense cluster of interconnected, extensively landscaped towers. DR: The invited teams all investigated one if not more of these pressing issues currently affecting Angelenos. LA Más' design addressed density and affordability by reconsidering the granny flat as a new model for low-rise high-density development in Elysian Valley along the L.A. River. PAR responded to increasing density and new transit offerings on the Wilshire Corridor with their proposal for a courtyard housing tower, where each unit maintains a visual connection to nature. And Bureau Spectacular investigated environmental challenges through the study and re-application of vernacular domestic architecture in L.A.
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Eavesdrop> Hollywood Hits the Beach: Who will live in Michael Maltzan’s new triangular house?

Rumor has it that Michael Maltzan Architecture (MMA) is hard at work on a triangle-shaped Malibu home for one of Hollywood’s biggest names. The MMA crew is keeping mum on the client, but we’ve heard it’s not an actor. Geometric coastal living for a director or producer, perhaps? According to Michael Maltzan's website:
Malibu’s coastline is defined by an unbroken band of residences; their repetition and consistency of scale reduces the individual house to a stripe in this striated border separating the Pacific Coast Highway from the expanse of the ocean... The form of the Broad Beach Residence arises from the confluence of these circumstances. The house consists of a single bar punctured by a tapered form that expands towards the ocean. As visitors pass through the threshold of the bar, the building’s form maximizes framed views to the western horizon by extending the visual limits of the house to embrace the ocean beyond. The residence’s formal inflection scales the domestic in counterpoint to the horizon. Simultaneously, the form creates a more consensual relationship between the residence and the beach, between public space and private space, and between the perception of scale and its physical form. This spatial infiltration is mirrored in the sectional overlap of the public beach and private space of the home. Sand slips like a carpet under the floating mass of the house, a thin stair slumps from the structure to the beach floor, and a heavy mass rises out of the sand to support the main volume above. As the angular form faces towards the water, it carves out twin courtyards that flank the interior spaces and restore a middle-scale to the composition at the edge of the land.
[All images courtesy Michael Maltzan.]