Posts tagged with "Low-E Glass":

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Safdie Architects-designed Changi Airport Jewel is enclosed by a sprawling toroidal dome

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The Safdie Architects–designed Jewel Changi Airport is a 144,000-square-foot toroidal-shaped glass-and-steel pavilion looping around the world’s tallest indoor waterfall. After four years of construction, the $1.3 billion project opened its doors in April 2019 as a bid to deliver a “paradise garden” amid the cacophony of Singapore’s largest airport. The structural system of the canopy is based on a highly complex stick-and-node mesh fabricated with over 50,000 distinct components assembled piece by piece on-site. The roof spans approximately 675 feet at its longest point and 510 feet at its widest. In total, the steel mesh weighs a colossal 6,000 tons.
  • Facade Manufacturer Vitro GnT Glass Company Yongnam Holdings Limited
  • Architect Safdie Architects
  • Facade Installer Mero Asia Pacific Choon Hin Stainless Steel
  • Facade Consultant BuroHappold Engineering
  • Location Singapore
  • Date of Completion October 2019
  • System Custom-shell gird
  • Products Vitro Solarban 70XL, Solarban 72, and Starphire Ultra-Clear
From above, the pavilion’s layout looks symmetrical, with many identical glass panels. This is not the case. “The design of the roof is a single-layer add-on system composed of 9,000 custom cut—no two panels are the same—double-glazed panels positioned over the triangulated steel diagrid structure,” said Safdie Architects principal Jaron Lubin. “The double-glazed panel sizes were determined to a maximum dimension of 8.5 feet measured diagonally, which was the size found commonly among several major suppliers.” The project is wrapped with Vitro Architectural Glass’s Low-E Solarban glass, while Vitro’s high-visibility Starphire Ultra-Clear is used for the interior’s pedestrian bridges. By using Low-E glass, the project is slated to receive a platinum rating from Singapore’s GreenMark program. Although the mechanics of the project are remarkably complex, Safdie Architects developed a design-to-construction methodology to ensure the timely completion of the pavilion. “The entire system, including glass panels, steel members, and the custom-shaped solid steel nodes, was fabricated directly from the design team’s computer model by CNC robots,” said Lubin. “The components were produced off-site and then shipped to Singapore in containers. Special labels with scan codes were used on all the components to assist in locating their final position in the building.” The centrally located Rainwater Vortex, the massive waterfall around an oculus approximately 33 feet in diameter, is the product of collaboration with BuroHappold Engineering and water-feature design firm WET Design. The oculus is topped with an ETFE cushion while a custom-designed circular valve controls water flow between a narrow gap in the glass facade’s surface.
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Elkus Manfredi's Citizens Bank campus zig-zags with ultra-high-performance concrete

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The Citizens Bank Corporate Campus in Johnston, Rhode Island, is not a subtle complex—it's composed of five sprawling buildings across a 123-acre site. Designed by Boston-based architectural practice Elkus Manfredi, the project serves as a new facility to accommodate approximately 3,000 financial services employees and all five buildings are predominantly clad with ultra-high-performance concrete and low-E glass laid over zig-zagging forms. For the massing and design of the complex, Elkus Manfredi sought to evoke the historic barn vernacular of New England. All of the buildings are fairly low slung, and range in height from two-to-four stories. The bulk of the elevations are clad with light-gray cementitious boards produced by Envel that, from a distance, resemble oversized and weathered shingles or vertically-oriented wood cladding. The boards themselves are all a standard width of 12 inches and reach a height of up to 15 feet, although the latter varies to accommodate sloping roofs and parapets. The panels are fastened to the steel structure through a steel girt and two layers of steel angled brackets.
  • Facade Manufacturer Vitro Tecnoglass Reynobond Invariwisp Envel Lafarge
  • Architect Elkus Manfredi Architects
  • Facade Installer Sunrise Erectors
  • Facade Consultant SGH
  • Location Jamestown, RI
  • Date of Completion 2018
  • System FW Graham 2508C Series Curtainwall Custom Envel UHPC system
  • Products Ductal UHPC panels Vitro Solarban 70XL Reynobond aluminum composite materials Tecnoglass SB70 on clear
"The design team decided to use cementitious boards based on its ability to achieve this appearance. But inherent in this agricultural aesthetic are imperfections, and those imperfections caused some issues with tolerances—both with the thickness of the boards themselves as well as the backing with its insulation and steel angles and girts," said Elkus Manfredi Architects. "There was concern about the aesthetics with these variations, but in the end, they contributed to the look that had been envisioned all along." The rooflines of the five structures are the most striking visual element of the campus. From a side profile, the peaks and depressions of the parapets form a series of imposing and concentric gables. Each peak of the gable hosts a yawning sawtooth clerestory, which effectively daylights stretches of office space below. On certain elevations, glass is the primary facade element and is framed by narrow bands of the cementitious board. The Solarban 70XL glass, supplied by Vitro, is mounted atop a curtainwall system fabricated by Graham Architectural Products. In terms of transitions, the meeting points between the window and roof proved to be one of the most challenging aspects of the project. The initial vision was for the panels to project over the glass curtain wall as a screen, with the boards stopping at the roofline without any metal coping. Ultimately, the design and facade consultancy teams settled on a narrow coping to control moisture whilst maintaining the clear lines of the gabled roofline.  
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Product> Exterior Glass: Eight options with special functions built in

The role of glass continues to expand in architecture as new performance properties and aesthetic qualities come to market in a steady flow. From photovoltaic glazing to printing technologies that address the issue of avian impacts, the material has become an active, dynamic force in buildings. SunGuard SNX 51/23 Guardian For commercial use, this high-performance, low-E glass has a VLT above 50 percent and a solar heat gain coefficient below .25. Solarban z75 PPG Featuring a neutral, cool-gray tint, this low-emissivity glass offers an intelligent combination of visible light transmittance, solar control, and light control. View Dynamic Glass View As the sun intensifies, a nanotech interlayer regulates an electric current that shifts ions in the glass, automatically darkening them. Offered in panels up to 5 feet by 10 feet. Ornilux Mikado Arnold Glas  This bird-protection glass features a patterned UV coating that is visible to birds, but virtually transparent to the human eye. i-Glass Oldcastle BuildingEnvelope  This screenless technology can print multiple colors and complex designs on exterior and interior glass. LightZone SageGlass  Variable tint zones within a single pane of electrochromic glass allows great flexibility for managing solar heat gain and glare. CLASS Sapphire Saint Gobain In sheets up to 9 inches by 26 inches and 12 inches by 24 inches, this transparent ballistic-resistant material achieves a 40 percent lighter and 40 percent thinner system than a glass-only design. DigitalDistinctions Etch Ink Viracon This ink simulates the look of acid-etched or colored-etched glass without high-pressure sand blasting or dangerous acids.
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Green Monsters

Isn't it annoying when you're trying to do your part to go green and then things catch on fire? In what some are calling a case of "green on green crime," a low-e glass window has been accused of melting the side-view mirror of a nearby Toyota Prius in Southern California. The Prius owner noticed a concentrated beam of sunlight reflecting off her neighbor's windows, which had been treated with a highly reflective energy efficient coating, after being told by her Toyota dealership that nothing was wrong with her car. It wouldn’t be the first time good windows turned bad: Las Vegas' Vdara hotel made headlines when its "death ray" reflected super-hot beams of light onto its pool deck, allegedly burning some sunbathers. Following reports of melted vinyl siding, pool covers, and car parts across the country, the National Association of Home Builders has launched a study about the amount of concentrated sunlight reflected from energy efficient windows. [DailyTech, image via CBS]
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Could Low-E Windows Melt Your Neighbors?

Every rose has its thorn, including those supposed holy grails of sustainable products. CFLs contain mercury. Biofuel competes with farmers for topsoil. Now high performance windows, particularly those of the double-pane, Low-E variety, have become the bane of suburbia, as they can apparently melt your neighbors home—or at least their vinyl siding. That was the news from a surprising report on Boston's Channel 5 news, sent to us by Infared New England, who tests for these sorts of things. It turns out that under the right circumstances, the windows work as magnifiers, focusing light on nearby buildings like a rascally child picking off ants. At least two area women have suffered the consequences, and there are plenty of similar videos on YouTube. So let this be a warning to you about the risks of vinyl siding next time you consider using it on a project. (Okay, let's be honest, if you're reading this, god forbid such a thought ever crossed your mind. Still, it's pretty crazy, the unintended consequences of this business of ours. Eh, Frank?)