Posts tagged with "FXFowle":

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Renderings revealed for final tower in contentious Long Island College Hospital redevelopment

After a tumultuous history of protests, arrests and community pushback, the redevelopment of the Long Island College Hospital (LICH) campus in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, into a luxury community is moving full steam ahead. Now named River Park, renderings for the development’s final tower, 5 River Park, have been revealed via New York YIMBY. Romines Architecture PLLC is designing the 91,000-square-foot tower. Split into two volumes, the 15-story tower will hold 30 condo units atop a lot-spanning ground floor lobby and parking area. As originally reported in 2016, owner Fortis Property Group had opted to build out the former LICH site as-of-right, forgoing a rezoning that would have required the company to build affordable housing in exchange for denser development. Now, as shown in the project’s master plan, Fortis has moved ahead with plans to build five new market-rate residential buildings throughout River Park, and retrofit the landmarked Polhemus Building and nearby townhouses into luxury housing. As part of the first phase, which is ongoing, the Polhemus Building, an 1897 Beaux Arts “hospital skyscraper” and part of the hospital there until its closing in 2008, is undergoing an exterior renovation and interior redesign by BKSK Architects and will eventually hold 17 condo units. The second phase is the most contentious part of the redevelopment, as the five planned towers will bring hundreds of high-priced units to the neighborhood. A different architecture firm has designed each, as Fortis wants River Park to be seen as a “new neighborhood” rather than a cluster of residences. Information on 3 and 4 River Park has yet to be released. FXCollaborative (formerly FXFowle) is designing the 15-story 1 River Park at 350 Hicks St., which will hold 48 apartments ranging from studios to penthouses. While no renderings have been released yet, the building will have an outdoor pool, gardens, and something called an “amenity pavilion.” Hill West Architects will be designing the tallest of the River Park towers, as 2 River Park, or 339 Hicks St., will top out at 440 feet tall. While the exact number of apartments included in the complex hasn’t been made public yet, a rooftop garden will be available for residents that will offer sweeping views across the East River into Manhattan. The design fully plays up the site’s proximity to the river, as Fortis notes it “is composed of a strong masonry tower acting as the 'mast,' supporting the 'sail,' a west-facing glass screen that curves like the headsail on a yacht.” Fortis has described the design of 5 River Park as contextual, stating that it uses “a palette of traditional materials common to Cobble Hill, including brick, limestone and elaborate metalwork.” The shorter half of the building will also be clad in traditional brick in contrast to the more modern, dark-grey concrete of the taller half behind it. Construction on 5 River Park is ongoing. It remains to be seen where a healthcare facility run by the NYU Langone Medical Center will be relocated to; the continuing operation of the center, with its freestanding emergency room, must be included by Fortis as part of a settlement reached with the city. Construction in the area is expected to finish in 2020.
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2017 Best of Design Awards for Unbuilt – Landscape

2017 Best of Design Award for Unbuilt – Infrastructure: Maker Park Architect: STUDIO V Architecture Location: Brooklyn, New York Maker Park proposes a vision to address Brooklyn’s disappearing industrial waterfront—reimagining what a public park for the 21st century should be. The design pays homage to Williamsburg’s legacy of manufacturing and culture of collaboration. Ten oil tanks are redesigned as community gardens, performance venues, and art installations. Each tank houses groves of trees, reflecting pools, vines, a theater, or an adventure playground. The restored inlet supports wildlife and boating, and a sloped lawn promotes performances while protecting from floods. “So many people would just see this industrial site as an eyesore—if they saw it at all. The designers found the beauty in it. Better still, their scheme helps others see that beauty. Preservation isn’t always about quaint neighborhoods and ornate cornices; it’s about former manufacturing sites and old oil tanks too. It’s all part of our shared heritage.” —Morris Adjmi, principal, Morris Adjmi Architects (juror) Landscape Architect: Ken Smith Workshop Cofounders of Maker Park: Stacey Anderson Zac Waldman Karen Zabarsky   Honorable Mention  Project: The Statue of Liberty Museum Architect: FXFOWLE Location: Liberty Island, New York The Statue of Liberty Museum is an extension of Liberty Park, which merges architecture with landscape. Monumental steps activate the large circular plaza by providing sitting, climbing, and viewing spaces for more than four million annual visitors. The 26,000-square-foot museum will include visitor services, a theater, and support spaces, and will feature Lady Liberty’s original torch. Honorable Mention Project: Pier 55 Architect: Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects Location: New York  Within the cancelled Pier 55 project is a story that never received its due: the landscape. Elevations 40 to 60 feet above the water treat the visitor to views which encompass the grandeur of the river and focus the eye on the delicate plants at one’s feet. Microclimates mitigate winter winds, buffer highway noise, and allow sunlight to reach marine life. Structural, Civil, & MEP Engineering, Events: Arup Designer: Heatherwick Studio Executive Architect: Standard Architects
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Amtrak reveals renderings for Philly’s 30th Street Station

In conjunction with designers FXFOWLE!melk, and Arup, Amtrak announced last week that it had chosen a final preferred concept for the plaza surrounding Philadelphia’s 30th Street Station. In the 107-page proposal, Amtrak called the area around the station a “sea of driveways,” and laid out steps the company was taking to modernize the transportation hub. Following up on an earlier call for input that Amtrak had put out in July, the final proposal comes after months of town hall meetings with Philadelphia residents. The new 30th Street Station will anchor the $6.5 billion 30th Street Station District Plan, an 18-million-square-foot, 35-year redevelopment of University City, the riverfront neighborhood surrounding Drexel, the University of Pennsylvania, Penn Medicine, and several other higher education institutions. 30th Street Station itself is only one piece of the puzzle, with other teams planning concurrent schemes for separate parcels, including SHoP Architects' and Netherlands-based landscape architects West 8’s Schuylkill Yards project. With an estimated 11 million riders passing through every year, and with Amtrak expecting that number to double by the time the 30th Street Station District Plan wraps up, any tweaks to the current station have to accommodate that increase. Besides serving Amtrak trains, 30th Street Station is the heart of Philadelphia’s regional SEPTA rail, and the new proposal better integrates the two disparate systems. A new ground-level entryway to the West Underground Concourse on the plaza was revealed, creating an underground connection to the SEPTA subway and trolley station. One of the biggest concerns that Amtrak has tried to address is how isolated the station is from the street. While 40 percent of the surveyed area around the station was classified as pedestrian-friendly, not all of it is connected to anything else or intuitive to navigate. Creating several pedestrian-only zones, the new proposal calls for the installation of rounded benches, planters and fountains designed to subtly delineate between plaza and parking lot. The west portico and southwest section of the plaza will also be converted into car-free green spaces. One minor change that should make a huge difference in the traffic patterns around the station is the creation of a distinct taxi pick-up zone at the east portico near the train platforms, and a drop-off zone on the west side. A 220-unit bike station will also be coming to the site, complete with lockers and bicycle rentals. Amtrak is currently searching for a “master developer” to actualize their proposal, with construction slated to begin  in 2020 and finish sometime between 2025 and 2030. Read the full proposal here.
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Philadelphians: How should architects revamp 30th Street Station?

As part of Philadelphia’s massive downtown redevelopment efforts, new plans were released on Tuesday for an integrated civic space surrounding 30th Street Station—the third-busiest Amtrak station in the country—by a design team including FXFOWLE, !melk, and ARUP. Over the next three decades, the station’s traffic is expected to double, according to a marketing brochure for the overall project, bringing renewed interest to the surrounding business district dubbed University City. This 30th Street Station Plaza revamp is part of a wider, $6.5 billion 30th Street Station District Plan being led by Amtrak in partnership with Brandywine Realty Trust, Drexel University, PennDOT and SEPTA. Back in 2016, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM), in association with WSP | Parsons Brinckerhoff, OLIN, and HR&A Advisors, completed the initial design of the District Plan. In parallel, SHoP and West 8 have been working with Drexel and Brandywine on the Schuylkill Yards project, a 14-acre redevelopment which makes way for a 627,000-square-foot office tower as well as the redesign of public commons and arterials that tie together the district’s core: Market Street, J.F.K. Boulevard, and Drexel Square. Station Plaza, with its team of FXFOWLE, !melk, and ARUP, is one of several other early-phase District Plan projects advancing simultaneously. While 30th Street Station is currently surrounded by a closed ring of parking lots and concrete infrastructure, FXFOWLE and partners are looking to install a public plaza encircling the building. Their plan incorporates raised planters, pedestrian byways, seating areas, a public pavilion, and a food truck area. Pavers in the shape of concentric dots correspond to below-ground train routes and mirror the circular fountains and skylights incorporated into surrounding green space. According to the plan, the taxi and automotive area—which utilizes about 50% of the space at present—will be relocated to a transportation zone at one side of the station, opening up the decongested space to foot circulation and flexible programming. In addition to increased pedestrian traffic, this move will also allow room for a new underground entrance at the West Portico; the entrance is an unbuilt feature of the station’s original 1934 plans. The plan, in its entirety, is designed to decongest the area around the station and reinvigorate a historic railway, connecting it to other developments in the comprehensive plan and the adjacent Schuylkill River. Amtrak and the project’s team have opened up the renderings (viewable here) for public comment via an online survey (accessible here). Garnering opinions from commuters, visitors and locals alike, the survey will be open until 8 pm on Wednesday, July 26, 2017.
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Pace University gears up for $190 million campus overhaul

Manhattan's Pace University has announced plans for a major expansion starting this summer.

Today the university unveiled a three-phase expansion plan for its lower Manhattan campus. Responding to increasing enrollment, the $190 million plan will reinvigorate academic and common areas at the school's two main academic buildings. New York's FXFOWLE is the design architect.

“Our goal was to create a master plan that matches the clarity and aspirations of Opportunitas: Embracing the Future [Pace's plan],” explained FXFOWLE senior partner Sylvia Smith, in a statement. “The plan responds to the needs of today’s learners, fosters an increased sense of community, and encourages engagement. We focused on student-centric solutions to activate, reveal and connect spaces and places at Pace.”

Phase One channels $45 million into reviving more than 55,000 square feet of space at One Pace Plaza and 41 Park Row, right near City Hall. Improvements will target One Pace Plaza's courtyard entrance, first, and then lower levels, adding a welcome center, new student center, learning commons, and quiet study areas. At (former New York Times building) 41 Park Row, the original entrance along Spruce Street will be restored, and FXFOWLE's work will add an art gallery and another student commons. 

The school's 13,000 undergraduate and graduate students take classes in the performing arts and liberal arts, business, science, and tech in Manhattan and at a Westchester County campus.

Construction on Phase One is expected to wrap in fall 2018.

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New renderings emerge for Statue of Liberty museum

Each year, 4.3 million visitors descend onto Liberty Island, most of them with one goal: To get up close to Lady Liberty herself. Notably, few have access to the island’s museum and even less to climb into the statue.

Since September 11, 2001, accessibility to the museum has diminished as security tightened. That, however, has not deterred tourists, as visitor numbers continue to climb. Fortunately, a new, bigger museum building is on the way on the western side of Liberty Island and will add 26,000 square feet to the museum’s space.

Designed by New York–based studio FXFowle, the 26,000-square-foot building will offer better circulation to accommodate the rush of tourists that disembark from the ferries, which arrive two or three times an hour. Fifteen thousand square feet will be dedicated to exhibitions showcasing the statue’s history, legacy, and construction details. Additional spaces will house a gallery, immersive theater, bookstore, and offices. The museum will be able to accommodate up to 1,200 visitors per hour, double the current capacity.

With an estimated budget of $70 million and slated to open in 2019, FXFowle’s design won’t detract from Lady Liberty herself. “Some people will say, ‘Why aren’t you building a much grander building?’ I say, we didn’t need a much grander building—the grander building is already there,” said Stephen Briganti, the president and chief executive of the private The Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation in The New York Times.

A green roof sown with native meadow species and spanning 20,000 square feet will double as a viewing area looking onto Downtown Manhattan and (of course) the Statue of Liberty. Quennell Rothschild & Partners will carry out landscaping for this and the rest of the site.

Interactive displays from ESI Design will be on view inside the museum in addition to the statue’s original torch, which was replaced in 1986 on Lady Liberty’s centennial. Thirty-three years later, that original torch will be housed in a glass-walled space—a welcome change from its windowless home in the current museum.

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2016 Best of Design Award for Residential > Multi-Unit: 400 Grove by Fougeron Architecture

The Architect’s Newspaper (AN)’s inaugural 2013 Best of Design Awards featured six categories. Since then, it’s grown to 26 exciting categoriesAs in years past, jury members (Erik Verboon, Claire Weisz, Karen Stonely, Christopher Leong, Adrianne Weremchuk, and AN’s Matt Shaw) were picked for their expertise and high regard in the design community. They based their judgments on evidence of innovation, creative use of new technology, sustainability, strength of presentation, and, most importantly, great design. We want to thank everyone for their continued support and eagerness to submit their work to the Best of Design Awards. We are already looking forward to growing next year’s coverage for you. 2016 Best of Design Award for Residential > Multi-Unit: 400 Grove Architect: Fougeron Architecture Location: San Francisco, CA

Located in the heart of the Hayes Valley neighborhood, 400 Grove is part of a bold initiative to reconnect Hayes Valley with surrounding neighborhoods following the removal of the Central Freeway. The building’s design references the central mews typology, which set row houses around an internal alley that provided car access as well as a social place for neighbors. To strengthen the community focus of the open space, this contemporary take reframes the alley as a landscaped common area accessible only to bicycles and pedestrians. Its faceted facade echoes the classic San Francisco bay windows that are prevalent in the area.

Developers DDG and DM Development

Landscape Architect Marta Fry Landscape Associates Structural Engineer Dolmen Structural Engineers Lighting Klus Design Wall Panels 3form

Honorable Mention, Residential > Multi-Unit: One John Street

Architects: Alloy Design Group Location: Brooklyn, NY

Located within Brooklyn Bridge Park, One John Street’s simple mass and masonry exterior is consistent with DUMBO’s many warehouses, yet a subtle window gradient, handmade Peterson bricks, and custom black concrete panels give it a distinctly contemporary feel.

Honorable Mention, Residential > Multi-Unit: 35XV

Architects: FXFOWLE Location: New York, NY

Employing dramatic cantilevers and an expressive, textured facade, 35XV contains both a high school and residential units in an angled glass tower that provides light and airy interior living spaces.

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Images revealed of new Statue of Liberty Museum on Liberty Island

Covering 26,000 square feet, the museum—designed by New York-based FXFowle—will provide more room to the 4.3 million visitors that pass through Liberty Island each year. More specifically, the museum's circulation will better accommodate the rush of tourists that disembark the ferries, which arrive two or three times an hour.

Since September 11, 2001 accessibility to the museum has diminished as security has been tightened. That, however, hasn't deterred Lady Liberty–loving travelers as visitor numbers continue to climb. Many who step off the ferries can only wander around the tiny island, not having tickets for the museum or the actual statue. “The idea was to make it possible for as many people to get in and experience the museum,” said Stephen Briganti, the president and chief executive of the private Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation.

The new museum is due to open in 2019, costing $70 million. FXFowle's design doesn't intend to detract from Lady Liberty herself. “This complements the statue without competing with it,” he said of the museum in the New York Times. “Some people will say, ‘Why aren’t you building a much grander building?’ I say, we didn’t need a much grander building—the grander building is already there.”

Interactive displays from ESI Design will be on offer inside the museum. The firm has also worked on the American Family Immigration History Center on Ellis Island. Also inside will be the statue's original torch which was replaced in 1986 on Lady Liberty's centennial. 33 years on, that torch will be housed in a glass-walled space—a welcome change from its windowless home in the museum today.

15,000 square feet will be exhibition space dedicated to showcasing the statue’s history, legacy, and construction details. That’s eight times larger that the current space and could accommodate up to 1,200 visitors per hour, doubling the current capacity. Aside from capacity and space, the new museum will feature a gallery, “immersive theater,” bookstore, and space for administrative purposes. The museum will also feature a green roof that doubles as a viewing area looking onto to Downtown Manhattan and (of course) the Statue of Liberty. "The museum's defining gesture is the lifting of the park itself, extending vistas rather than ending them, and creating a new, naturalized habitat in place of a traditional building," said FXFowle on their website. "The angular forms and spaces are shaped by expansive views and the irregularity of the water's edge." The firm also clarified their intention to use materials native to the island: Stony Creek granite, bronze, and plaster.
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Plans for massive South Bronx affordable housing project move forward

A New York City Council committee has approved La Central, a major affordable housing development that heralds change for the South Bronx. Designed by New York–based FXFOWLE, La Central is a one-million-square-foot, 992-unit complex on city-owned vacant land in Melrose that will be built under the auspices of New York City Department of Housing Preservation and Development in collaboration with private and nonprofit developers, as well as community-based social services organizations. The five-building complex, organized around a village green–type square, includes retail space, 160 units of supportive housing for homeless veterans and people with HIV/AIDS, plus a plethora of mixed-use projects: Television studios for Bronxnet, a new YMCA, and an urban farm "training garden" operated by GrowNYC. The area is alight with new development: La Central is adjacent to a Bjarke Ingels Group-designed police station, the future home of the 40th Precinct. At a September 8 meeting, the City Council Committee on Land Use approved five land use modifications to allow the development to move forward. The committee sanctioned the designation of an urban development action area for the parcels between Bergen and Brook Avenues; waived open space, yard, height, and setback requirements for the mixed-use development; allowed a C6-2 district to replace existing M1-1 and C4-4 districts; and applied Mandatory Inclusionary Housing (MIH) to the lots that will host apartments. The complex will be the largest so far to utilize MIH, which requires developers to provide a certain number of permanently affordable units and is a key part of Mayor de Blasio's plan to build or preserve 200,000 units of affordable housing in the next decade. Despite ostensible support in the council, MIH has faced opposition in practice: Last month, the City Council defeated a privately developed MIH project in Inwood. Nevertheless, hopes for affordable housing development remain high at City Hall: “I believe La Central is a project that can truly help to move the South Bronx forward,” the mayor told the Daily News. The project is expected to be complete in 2017.
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Facades+AM DC to focus on environmental concerns and the building envelope

On March 10, Facades+AM, the half-day spin-off of the popular Facades+ conference series, returns to the nation's capital. The symposium is co-chaired by FXFOWLE senior partner Mark Strauss and FXFOWLE principal Kevin Cannon. "One of the things we noticed over the last year is that there's a lot of emphasis on expanding the envelope not just in terms of ideas in Washington, but also responding to environmental concerns," said Strauss. "There's an interest in sustainability from the public side, but also from the development side." Facades+AM DC will comprise one keynote address and two closely-related panel discussions. After registration, breakfast, and opening remarks from Strauss and Cannon, Handel Architects president Gary Handel will deliver a talk on his firm's new residential tower for Cornell University's New York City Tech Campus. The tower's facade is a key contributor to its status as the world's largest and tallest building designed to Passive House standards. "One aspect we haven't seen very much in Washington, but thought we could use this even to push, is to explore the idea of Passive House and its impact," said Strauss. "It will be interesting to hear about the challenges" Handel has encountered in scaling up, added Cannon. Handel's keynote address sets the stage for the morning's first panel, "Facades and the Environment." Presenters include Roger Frechette III (Interface Engineering), Robert Moje (VMDO Architects), and Nora Wang (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory). The discussion will center on how changes in environmental design, including the rise of net zero, have influenced architecture and building performance. In addition to hearing from Moje, whose firm actively explores the intersection between sustainability theory and practice in school design, "We're going to talk to engineers who are looking at how you begin to quantify and measure these things," said Cannon. The final panel, on "The Future of the Office Building," brings together Akridge's Bob Schofield, Duncan Lyons (Gensler), and Marc Simmons, of Front, Inc. "There's been a revolution around office buildings," observed Strauss. "We're re-thinking the face of the office building, but the panel is also going to explore how the work environment is changing, and how that influences facades." In reference to FXFOWLE's own portfolio, including a contemporary project in Turkey and the New York Times building (Renzo Piano), Cannon said, "We've been doing a lot of work lately on seeing how the inside of the building influences the facade. We want to see how those influences will land in DC." Join Strauss, Cannon, and other movers and shakers in the world of building envelope design and fabrication March 10 at Facades+AM DC. Learn more and register today on the conference website.
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Rumored Financial District supertall by FXFOWLE gets a trim, but will the views make up for it?

Rumor had it that the Financial District would be getting a 1,000-foot-tall tower on Trinity Place. This week, renderings were revealed for the FXFOWLE-designed building, and, at 500 feet, it's considerably shorter than anticipated. As a consolation to supertall lovers out there, every unit will have water views. Seventy Seven Greenwich Street, a 285,000-square-foot mixed-use building in the Financial District will rise 35 stories, the New York Post reports. The 500-foot-tall project will include 7,000 square feet of retail and 85 condominiums, as well as a 476-seat elementary school on floors one through nine. The glass facade design may change, as the architects have not yet decided on the precise tint and configuration of the glass panels. Deborah Berke Partners will take the lead on designing apartment interiors and amenities spaces. In addition to standard offerings like bike storage, the tower will also include a dog spa. The project's completion date is set for 2019. Renderings show 77 Greenwich Street, with a street address at 28–42 Trinity Place, squatting over the landmarked Robert and Anne Dickey House, a federal style townhouse at 28–30 Trinity Place that dates from the early 1800s. Plans call for the interior to be repurposed and the facade restored, though it looks like all other buildings on the block will be demolished. Though this building has a prime location, it is hardly FXFOWLE's biggest New York project. This month, Governor Andrew Cuomo announced that the firm will spearhead the one billion dollar Javits Center expansion and renovation.
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New York’s enormous Javits Center could grow $1 billion larger with Cuomo’s plan and FXFOWLE’s design

As part of a package of proposals for his 2016 agenda, development on Manhattan's West Side will intensify. Governor Andrew M. Cuomo recently revealed a $1 billion plan to expand the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. The expansion, designed by New York–based FXFOWLE, calls for adding 1.2 million square feet of event and meeting space, as well as a four-story, 480,000-square-foot parking garage to house the 20,000 or so tractor-trailers that bring event supplies to and from the venue each year. The Javits Center, between West 34th and West 40th streets along 11th Avenue, is one of the nation's busiest convention centers. The state estimates that the convention center generated $1.8 billion in economic activity in 2014. Cuomo's proposal would add 1.2 million square feet of space to the 2.1 million-square-foot venue, increasing its size by 50 percent. Upgrades include 500,000 square feet of uninterrupted event space, as well as a 60,000-square-foot ballroom. The parking facility will improve pedestrian safety by diverting trucks from the streets surrounding the Javits Center into a central delivery area with 35 loading docks. The venue is aiming to up its current LEED Silver certification to LEED Platinum with energy-saving upgrades. 2014 renovations added a 6.75 acre green roof, new flooring, and a new facade. A 34,000-square-foot solar energy array, the largest on any public building in New York, will be installed to complement these upgrades. Additionally, a terrace with a 2,500 person capacity will be built to take advantage of sweeping Hudson River views. Construction is expected to begin in late 2016. See the gallery below for more images of the planned renovations.