Posts tagged with "Chicago":

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Quick Clicks> Boardwalk, High-Speed, Archives 2.0, the Street

Boardwalk Empire. The Brooklyn Paper reports that Coney Island will not be getting a concrete boardwalk, at least not if Community Board 13 has a say in the matter. The board members recently voted down a proposal from the Parks Department that would cement over parts of the historic Riegelmann Boardwalk while covering some of the famed seaside path with recycled plastic lumber.

Express Train. The Van Alen Institute wants to know what you think of the future of high-speed rail in the United States. Check out its call for design ideas here.

Digital Architectural History. The Chicago Tribune's Blair Kamen brings news that the good folks at the Ryerson and Burnham Archives at the Art Institute of Chicago have digitized 5,000 images from Archpaper's late 19th century predecessor, the Inland Architect and News Record, offering up photos and drawings from a pivotal period in US architectural history. Sharing is Caring. New York's Municipal Art Society kicked off its second annual "Streets Month" with a program about the city's new and innovative place-making efforts, including a presentation by DOT Commissioner Janette Sadik-Khan. Check out a recap and analysis from MAS over here.  
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Quick Clicks> Cabrini Lights Up, Earth Powers Down, Calming Queens, and Starchitect Houses

Cabrini Green Kablooey. This Wednesday, the last high rise tower at Chicago's Cabrini Green site will be demolished, marking the end of the famous housing project. Polis reminds us that artist Jan Tichy and social worker Efrat Appel plan to mark the occasion with an art installation. Project Cabrini Green translates 134 poems into light and will begin display at 7:00pm tonight. (Also catch a live internet feed here.) Earth Hour. This past weekend, people, companies, and cities all over the globe celebrated Earth Hour by switching off the lights to spotlight issues of energy consumption. The Boston Globe's Big Picture is running a photo essay of some dramatic skylines with and without lights. Calming Queens. StreetsBlog brings news of New York's latest traffic calming measure proposed for 48th Avenue and 44th Drive in Queens. The block shown above in Long Island City would initially be painted for affordability and eventually transformed into a greenway. Cribs. Inspired by Philip Johnson's Glass House, Curbed goes in search of the homes of famous architects. Represented in the list are Alvar Aalto, Frank Gehry, Norman Foster, and Robert A.M. Stern.
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Quick Clicks> Anti-Mies, Timber, Thunder, Head Start

  Mies Bashing. For all the glory of Modernist Chicago, there are still those who mourn the loss of the White City's Beaux Arts influence. Historian David Garrard tells WBEZ of the "sterile" Daley Center's ruinous effect on The Loop. One has to wonder what he'd make of Time Out Chicago's "Fifteen Fanciful Ways to Fix Navy Pier." Tiiiimmmmbeeeeerrrrr! Meanwhile, at another Navy locale...Chuck Schumer is hopping mad about contorting being done by the U.S. Army to get out of repairing the 158-year-old Timber Shed at Brooklyn's Navy Yard. The Brooklyn Paper reports that the senator is pressing army brass, which still has control over the building, to fix it or get out of the way and let the city do it. For Sale: Beach front property, water views, lively neighborhood. WSJ reports that the land where Coney Island's famed Thunderbolt roller coaster scared the bejesus out of generations of New Yorkers can now be had for $75 million to $95 million. Way Head Start. NYC Department of Buildings launched their Junior Architects and Engineers Program this week at PS31, reports NY1. (The news clip, starring fifth grade Frank Lloyd Wright fan Thomas Patras, is just too cute to pass up.)
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Quick Clicks> Cooper, Dharavi, Evolution, Charts

Keeping Cooper. There's a fight brewing over the demolition of the 186-year-old 35 Cooper Square. A demolition permit had been issued and subsequent stop work orders and candlelight vigils. The small federal style structure was once home to descendants of Peter Stuyvesant and beatnik Diane DiPrima. Keep tabs on the little building at EV Grieve and the Bowery Alliance (And in other Cooper Square preservation news, what's going to happen to the Astor Place mosaics under the planned pedestrian plaza upgrades?) Slum for Sale. In the heart of Mumbai, India, the Dharavi settlement is under pressure to redevlop. Polis has a review of a new documentary on the struggles of a "city tearing at the seams" trying to balance capital growth and the needs of its inhabitants. Urban Evolution. Cities are constantly changing, but we rarely take the big step back and look at how an area has evolved over, say, the past 500 years. Aid Watch put together a visual history of one block in New York's Soho neighborhood, from wilderness, to brothel central, to home of high-end retail. (Via Economix.) Infographic. Gothamist uncovers an interesting chart comparing Chicago and New York by the statistics. Categories include miles of transit track, cost of living, and even who has better pizza.
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Quick Clicks> Drawing, Green, Aerial, Plans

Block by Block. Brooklyn-based illustrator James Gulliver Hancock is attempting to draw All the Buildings in New York in quite beautiful pen and ink sketches like the one above. Watch a video of the artist explaining his inspirations, style, and how a chained up wheelchair is architecture after the jump. (via Gothamist.) Leeders. Blair Kamin discusses the competitive race to build green among major cities today. Chicago is still number one for the most LEED-certified buildings, but the self-proclaimed "greenest city in America" faces some stiff competition. Aerial. Building Design is running a new series of aerial photos showing progress at the 2012 Olympics site in London. 12,000 workers are reportedly on site working on the main stadium, aquatics center, and arena. Master Plan. Now that South Sudan's national independence has been approved, Sudan Votes reports that the government has revealed a model of a planned new capital city to replace the chaotic regional capital Juba, but not everyone is happy with the move.  (via Planetizen.)
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Design Deeply But Maybe Don′t Breathe Deeply

Chicago may boast one of the country's largest urban solar installations, but it's also home to two polluting coal-fired power plants, the Fisk Generating Station in Pilsen and the Crawford Generating Station in Little Village both operated by Midwest Generation. The two plants emit toxins and advocates say they contribute to elevated asthma rates in those neighborhoods. A new competition ask designers propose solutions to the problem, which could be anything from educational campaigns to remediation strategies. Sponsored by Design Makes Change, the ideas competition calls for "hyperlocal" strategies and asks designers to select specific sites within the neighborhoods, such as an individual school or a healthcare facility. The winner will receive $2000 of seed money toward implementing their proposal. For more listings, head over to our competitions page.
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Competing Visions for Chicago, Big and Small

Two new competitions of note explore possible futures for Chicago's public realm. The 2011 Burnham Prize ideas competition sponsored by AIA Chicago and the Chicago Architectural Club calls for new visions for the McCormick Place East building, the 1971 modernist covention center on the lakefront designed by Gene Summers of C.F. Murphy Associates. The massive, Miesian building has a powerful presence on the lakefront, and a vast column-free interior, but parks advocates have long contended it should be removed. Meanwhile, the building's owner, the Metropolitan Pier and Exposition Authority, says it needs $150 million in repairs and is functionally obsolete. The competition aims to inspire new dialogue around the future of the building and site. The Street Furniture 2011 competition sponsored by Architecture for Humanity's Chicago chapter aims for something more universal, new street furniture that could be deployed to activate almost any vacant site. With a $1000 budget in mind, the competition calls for a piece or pieces of street furniture that could activate an open lot for a year in anticipation of future development as a garden. The furniture could then also be moved to a new site. The winning design will be built and installed at an unnamed location.
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Quick Clicks> He′s Back, Pay Up, On Fire, Sale!

On Track. The mayor of Chicago holds sway in a big way. That's why we're keeping an eye on the ballot, and, as of today, Rahm Emanuel is back in business, reports The Chicago Tribune. Emanuel has stated that one of his first priorities is to expand Chicago Transportation Authority's Red Line. Street price. Speaking of getting around town, a new coalition called the Sustainable Transportation Campaign is reviving the idea of congestion pricing for New York City, reports Andrea Bernstein at Transportation Nation. Change of Hearth. Curling up by a roaring fire sounds idyllic on a snowy day, but do the realities of a fireplace outweigh the romance? We're still debating the subject following this piece in The New York Times. Bookmark it. MoMA's Design Store book sale is in full swing, says Curbed NY. Architecture and design classics and new releases over 50% off! Visit the stores in New York or online.
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Quick Clicks> Carchitecture, Cats, Litter, Blight

[ Quick Clicks> A guided tour of interesting links from across the web. And beyond. ] Carchitecture. What happens when you hire Herzog & de Meuron to design your parking garage? People suddenly begin to push out the cars. That seems to be the case in Miami Beach according to a NY Times article on the upscale soirees and and tourists that have become common place in the uncommon structure. Cats on Broadway. No, it's not a return of Andrew Lloyd Webber's musical, but a proposal to add a little theatrics to Chicago's Broadway. Curbed reports that the proposal is part of an IIT thesis project calling for a pedestrian-oriented street complete with a statue of a giant waving car (or more properly, a Maneki Neko). Please Litter. Could the latest trend in snail mail be a pro-littering campaign? According to TreeHugger, Google has embedded seeds in paper (recycled, of course) for a recent mailer. The letter advises its recipient to "plant in a sunny spot with a thin layer of soil... and watch it grow." Abandonment. Detroit has become infamous for its ruins, and ruins can be oh so seductive, but Noreen Malone at The New Republic says it's time to end our infatuation with "ruin porn." Malone takes aim at the message a deserted photograph devoid of people sends when Detroit's abandoned are left out of the abandonment. [ Photo credit: joevare/flickr. ]
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Quick Clicks: Ruination, Context, Issues, Movement, Resolutions

[ Quick Clicks> A hand-selected tour of links from around the world. ] Ruination. Mayor Bloomberg received an angry letter in the mail last week from Zahi Hawass, the secretary general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities. According to the NY Times, Hawass is threatening to take back the circa-1500 B.C. monument if the city doesn't properly care for the inscribed hieroglyphics. Heavily eroded, the obelisk was a gifted to the United States in 1869 to celebrate the completion of the Suez Canal. Out of Context. After last week's unveiling of the Broad Art Foundation in Los Angeles, NY Times architecture critic Nicolai Ouroussoff penned a rather scathing critique of of the Diller Scofidio + Renfro designed museum. Among his jabs was a note that the design was out of context to LA's landscape of freeways and sprawl causing Charles Siegel (Preservation Institute Blog) to wonder whether it's appropriate to build to the context of autopian sprawl. Planning Issues. Planetizen has compiled a list of 2010's "Top Planning Issues." Last year was great for renting, bikes, and China but not so hot for city finances, McMansions, or free parking. Movement. The Sydney Morning Herald weighs in on Frank Gehry's recently unveiled UTS building in Sydney, and architect Elizabeth Farrelly raises her concerns. "It's not a choice between the dull box and the exuberant PR-driven sculpture. There is a third option: architecture. We deserve it." (Via ArchNewsNow.) Resolutions. Chicago is going on a road diet. The Chicago Tribune says the city will undertake the traffic experiment on a mile-long stretch of Lawrence Street. The four-lane road will be trimmed down to three lanes with widened sidewalks, landscaped islands, and, of course, bike lanes. While Chicago has already slimmed down nearly a dozen other neighborhood streets in recent years, this example is the first time it's being done on a major arterial road. Construction will begin next year if funding comes through.
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Remembering Louis Sullivan, Seed-Germ Savant

There’s been no shortage of worthy architectural documentaries in recent years, but you’ll want to make room on your DVD rack for the latest look at a major American figure: Louis Sullivan: The Struggle for American Architecture. Recently given its New York premiere courtesy of the good people at Docomomo New York/Tri-State, this touching and tragic film offers a portrait of the man who perhaps more than anyone aspired to create an American style of architecture, yet was left behind by a nation on the cusp of a century that Sullivan himself did much to define. First-time director Mark Richard Smith frames Sullivan’s story as a battle between the architect's original vision—one explicitly crafted as an expression of American democracy—and historicist styles imported from Europe that would sweep the nation in the late 19th century. The latter are embodied by Sullivan’s Chicago archrival Daniel Burnham, whose triumph at the World’s Columbian Exposition in 1893—where the sprawling White City was an ode to Beaux-Arts classicism—drove the nail in the coffin of modern experimentation, and, as Sullivan bitterly remarked, was the place where “architecture died.” Even for devotees of Sullivan’s astonishing output, the details of his life are not well known, and the film puts his career in the context of a Chicago surging from the ashes of the Great Fire of 1871, the “Katrina of its day” that created huge opportunities for architects. Into this boom stepped Dankmar Adler, a renowned acoustician but lackluster designer who saw just the creative spark his firm needed in a young Louis Sullivan. Adler & Sullivan would design landmarks such as Chicago’s Auditorium of 1889, taking cues from H.H. Richardson’s brawny Romanesque but leavening it with Sullivan’s unusual decorative programs. When Frank Lloyd Wright joined the team as chief draftsman, one of the great ensembles in architecture was born. (The firm’s work is chronicled in the recent Complete Architecture of Adler & Sullivan, another must-have volume for Chicago architecture aficionados.) The film, itself just released on DVD, taps experts like City University’s Robert Twombly and Chicago historian Tim Samuelson to add depth to Sullivan’s story, including the major innovations marked by his early skyscrapers. Of seven tall buildings he managed to complete, five are left, and the influence those few structures would have on American architecture, with their emphasis on verticality and functional design, is the architect’s last word over his historicist contemporaries. It wasn’t the later Mies or Corb, of course, but Sullivan who coined the phrase that would define the century to come: “form ever follows function.” Nearly all of Sullivan’s major surviving buildings are gorgeously photographed here, with close-up pans across the upper reaches of Buffalo’s Guaranty Building and inside the Auditorium, for example, revealing ornamental details hardly visible from below. Among the discoveries of his late career is a string of one-off bank buildings in small midwestern towns that are delicate masterpieces made by a man who knew history had left him for dead. Chronicling the last years of Sullivan’s life, during which the destitute designer was forced to sell his personal effects at auction, the film pauses over a devastating note inscribed on a drawing made as Sullivan sat in borrowed quarters to compose a primer on ornament. As if reaching back to the inspirational wellspring of his youth, Sullivan writes: “Remember the seed-germ.” For the architecture-obsessed, this is spine-tingling stuff. Louis Sullivan may not pack the psychodrama of Nathaniel Kahn’s My Architect, but its close focus on the buildings themselves makes it equally affecting. By the end of this journey through the rafters and across the cornices of a great architect’s career, you feel the film’s sweeping subtitle—the struggle for American architecture—just about hits the mark.
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Feel Wright at Home in Chicago's Riverside

A sprawling Frank Lloyd Wright masterpiece could be yours for a cool three mil.  Curbed Chicago digs up the listing for Chi-town's Coonley House in the historic Riverside neighborhood.  The original clients apparently buttered up Wright, who, flattered, gave the house extra attention to detail. With five bedrooms and five baths spread out over 6,000 square feet, the prairie-style Coonley House is a far cry from Wright's Usonian houses.  The grounds are lavishly landscaped and include lilly-padded-pond overlooked by original leaded-glass windows. The Coonley House, 1908-1912, has been lovingly restored including a 50-foot mural in the living room and the original Jens Jensen landscape. Call this Frank Lloyd Wright classic home for just $2.89 million.