Posts tagged with "Boston Society of Architects":

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Boston architects come together to make a 3D-printable map of the city

The Boston Planning & Development Agency (BPDA) has long kept 3D models of its city. However, cobbled together over the years, the files are at times cumbersome and as firms increasingly turn to 3D printing for model making and testing, not so useful. Printers don’t know how to process them or they are not designed in a way that print with stability. MakeTANK, an initiative of the Boston Society of Architects (BSA) saw this as an opportunity. MakeTANK was initially started to “integrate maker culture into the design process,” according to Sasaki director of technical resources Bradford J. Prestbo, who has been intimately involved with the project along with the rest of the firm. The hope was to leverage the many makers and maker spaces in the greater Boston area, and help architects increase client engagement and decrease contractor risk—and cost—by testing their designs out first. “Imagine going into a restaurant where the chef only wrote recipes and has never actually cooked them,” said Prestbo, half-joking. “That's kind of like the architectural profession today, where we just do a lot of paper architecture and paper designs without going through the process to actually taste what we've coupled together to make sure it's actually an effective solution that also will perform long term.”  City Print is MakeTANK's latest project, just announced at ABX19, though it’s been under development for over a year. The collaborative team of architects that came together for City Print developed a series of scripts that helped turn the existing models of Boston into “watertight solids,” meaning that when processed in Grasshopper they can be effectively fed into 3D printers. They also added additional topographic details. The process, however, could not be fully automated. The files have to be individually opened, the scripts ran, and all of it double and triple checked for quality control. To help convert the over 200 model tiles of the city to be 3D ready, MakeTANK has enlisted the “who’s who” of Boston-area architects. “We are engaging in the greater AEC community to help us process the tiles,” explained Jay Nothoff, Sasaki fabrication studio manager, “and then turning around and handing this resource back to that same community as a finished project for everyone to enjoy and use as they will further project work.” The revamped models will be added to the BPDA's free repository and the BSA is using them themselves. They’ll be replacing their lobby's current scale model of the city—the basis of which was originally designed in the 1980s and is mostly focused on the financial district—with a new, modular replica made from these printed files. “We're zooming out from the financial district,” said Nothoff. “We're including the City of Boston in its entirety and we're making a model that is easily updated because it is built off a grid system. As portions of the city change and grow, these titles are semi-precious at best; they're just going to be held in place with magnets so we can pull the tile and put a new one in its place to most accurately represents the City of Boston in its current state.” Felipe Francisco, an architectural designer at Sasaki, went on to explain that many community groups didn’t feel represented by the previous BSA model. “We're open to try and create a new dialogue with those groups,” explained Francisco. “We want to use this as a resource for community groups to be able to come in and use this model to diagram stories over it through projection mapping about their communities.” By collaborating with visualization experts, the BSA is developing tools to use the re-built model as a storytelling and visualization device. “The intention is to build a base projection for the model itself that delineates roads, waterways and what have you,” said Nothoff. On top of that could be layered information on sea-level rise, income data, other metrics, or more abstract visuals. “We're reaching out to various organizations throughout the greater Boston area, such as the Boston Foundation, to help us gather all the voices that are currently feeling underrepresented and give them equity with his model and teach them how to use the projection map on to the model and tell their story.” The process is ongoing. Interested area firms can “check out” tiles from a grid of the city, and for a dose of healthy competition, check out a leader board. “You grab a tile, fill out a form, and submit it and shortly thereafter you get all the support files and the working files and scripting as well as instructions on how to process them,” explained Prestbo.

ABX | ArchitectureBoston Expo 2019

At the largest architecture, building and design event in the Northeast, you will find the complete spectrum of companies, people and ideas. Everyone who has a role in the industry comes together at this annual event to conduct face-to-face meetings, experience the newest innovations, participate in cutting-edge conference workshops, and build relationships at high-level networking events. During the two-day show you will meet 300+ exhibitors of all sizes displaying products, services, ideas and innovations. The educational conference program offers 100+ accredited workshops designed to polish skills, spark ideas and offer real world-solutions. Join us for ABX19 taking place Nov. 6-7 at the Boston Convention & Exhibition Center to walk away inspired to expand your business.
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2017 Harleston Parker Medal finalists revealed

Four Boston-based firms have been shortlisted for this year’s Harleston Parker Medal. Awarded by the Boston Society of Architects (BSA), the winner will be recognized for designing the “the single most beautiful building or other structure” erected in Boston in the past decade.

In the running for 2017: Höweler + Yoon, Jonathan Levi Architects, William Rawn Associates, and Payette. Now in its 96th edition, this year’s jury is led by Yugon Kim, founding owner and partner of IKD, as well as associate and director at TSKP Studio. Kim enlisted ten professionals from Boston that specialize a variety of disciplines, covering urban planning, design, architecture, and media, notably including Dante Ramos, ideas editor at The Boston Globe and principal of Boston firm, CBT Architects, Kishore Varanasi.

The finalists and their respective shortlisted projects are listed here, in no particular order: Boston Public Library, Central Library Renovation Project (Transformation of the Johnson Wing) William Rawn Associates Collier Memorial Höweler + Yoon Read more about this project here. Field Elementary School Jonathan Levi Architects Interdisciplinary Science and Engineering Complex Payette

The Harleston Parker Medal award was established in 1921 by J. Harleston Parker after his father. The BSA awarded the first medal in 1923 partnership with the Boston chapter of the American Institute of Architects. Last year, Dutch studio Mecanoo and the Boston office of Sasaki were awarded the medal for their Bruce C. Bolling Municipal Building. Other previous winners include Renzo Piano Building Workshop who worked with Stance on the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum addition and Foster + Partners with CBT Architects who designed the Museum of Fine Arts and the Boston Art of the Americas Wing.

The winner of the medal is to be announced on Thursday January 18 next year at the seventh BSA Design Awards Gala.

The full jury is listed below:

  • Yugon Kim, founding owner and partner, IKD; associate and director, TSKP Architects Boston
  • Karin Goodfellow, director, Boston Art Commission
  • Cynthia Smith FASLA, vice president and principal, Halvorson Design Partnership
  • Anne-Sophie Divenyi AIA, senior capital project manager, Harvard University, Office of Physical Resources and Planning
  • Malia Lazu, president, EpiCenter Community
  • Lee Moreau AIA, principal, Continuum
  • Alexa Pinard, urban designer, Boston Planning & Development Authority
  • Dante Ramos, Ideas editor, The Boston Globe
  • Kishore Varanasi, principal, CBT Architects
  • Richard A. Yeager  AIA, assistant director of planning and design, Boston College
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New exhibition at BSA Space explores playground design

Now on view at BSA Space is an exhibition and accompanying education program that focuses on playgrounds around the world. Dubbed Extraordinary Playscapes, it will run until September 5, 2016 and was curated by Design Museum Boston. On display are drawings, sketches, videos, scale models, and playable installations featuring 40 international playgrounds. Examples of contemporary architect-designed playgrounds in the U.S. abound: in April, the Rockwell Group–designed Imagination Playground (featured in Extraordinary Playscapes) opened in Brownsville, Brooklyn. Similarly, in December the renovated Adventure Playground in Central Park, designed by Richard Dattner, also opened. These two playgrounds provide the opportunity for “unstructured play,” a growing trend in playgrounds. Some of the designs featured in the exhibition include: Wild Walk in Tupper Lake, New York, designed by Chip Reay; PlayForm7 in Singapore, designed by Playworld Inc; Esplanade Playspace in Boston, designed by Halvorson Design Partnership; Takino Rainbow Nest in Takino, Japan, designed by Toshiko Horiuchi MacAdam; Maggie Daley Park in Chicago, designed by Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates; and Ambulance Playground at Beit CURE Hospital in Malawi, Africa, designed by Super Local. You can read more about Extraordinary Playscapes here.
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Architects will soon suspend this cellulose fiber canopy made from discarded paper in Boston

Recognizing architects’ increased use of installations for experimentation and prototyping, the "Bigger than a Breadbox, Smaller than a Building" competition awards project proposals that use the medium for spatial exploration. This year’s selected winner is The Pulp Canopy by Katie Donahue and Mason Limke of MYKA, who explore architectural applications of cellulose fiber (paper pulp), considered the “most abundant raw material on the planet.” The architects collected discarded paper products, transformed them into pulp and reshaped the pliable mulch into modules of varying thinness, transparency, and texture. Originally conceptualized as The Pulp Wall, Donahue and Limke reimagined it as a canopy for the competition, which requires entrants to re-envision a previous installation in the context of the competition brief rather than produce an original proposal. The work of art will hang from the ceiling in the lobby of the Boston Society of Architects headquarters at 290 Congress Street. In the meantime, the honorable mention teams such as Beta-Field, Alibi Studio, Justin Diles, and Studio Modo, are also preparing their projects for exhibition in Bigger than a Breadbox, opening June 17. The exhibition as a whole examines the “appropriation” of installation in contemporary architectural practice as an investigative tool for experimenting with new materials and technologies. Space constraints are part of the challenge: the double-height lobby of the building allows for an installation covering 150 square feet of floor space and extending up to 8 feet high. A further stipulation is that the installation must actively engage building occupants and visitors to the gallery. Winning designs for "Bigger than a Breadbox, Smaller than a Building 2015" were selected by the following jury members:
  • Benjamin Ball, Ball-Nogues Studio (Los Angeles, CA)
  • Shauna Gilles-Smith, Ground (Boston, MA)
  • Monica Ponce de Leon, MPdL Studio (Ann Arbor, MI; New York, NY; Boston, MA)
  • Jenny Sabin, Jenny Sabin Studio (Philadelphia, PA)
  • J. Frano Violich, Kennedy Violich Architecture, Ltd. (Boston, MA)
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On View> The Boston Society of Architects digs into the future of typography in new exhibition

  Stereotype: New directions in typography The Boston Society of Architects 290 Congress Street, Suite 200 Boston, MA Through May 25 The Boston Society of Architects (BSA) is currently exploring the boundaries and possibilities of traditional typography with an exhibition called Stereotype: New directions in typography. To delve into the future of the form—and to raise questions about what is next for it—the BSA is presenting works from 14 up-and-coming and established designers from around the world.   “By exploring the opportunities at the intersection of technology and design, this new breed of artists is expanding the boundaries of traditional typography and integrating elements from the fields of animation, craft, performance, nanoscience, and graffiti into their work,” said the BSA in a statement. To push past a conventional understanding of typography as purely two-dimensional, the exhibition incorporates “time, movement, and the third dimension.”
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On View> Reprogramming the City at the Boston Society of Architects Space

Reprogramming the City Boston Society of Architects Space 290 Congress Street, Suite 200 Boston, MA Through September 29 BSA Space presents a mixed-media exhibition, Reprogramming the City, curated by urban designer Scott Burnham. The works on display—videos, photographs, media stations, renderings, models—explore how the built environments of cities around the world are being retrofitted to accommodate new urban inhabitants and visitors. The exhibit also includes examples of urban infrastructure and systems that are being reimagined to reinvent a more functional urban landscape. There are 40 innovative examples from London, Amsterdam, Copenhagen, Hong Kong, and Boston that seek to develop new ways of urban design from within the city.
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An Award Winning Recyclable Ribbon of Celebration

ENfold Pavilion, a new temporary landscape installation designed by Perkins + Will in Boston’s Evans Way Park, utilizes natural reusable materials as its base and steers clear of harmful environmental impacts in both its construction and placement. The installation, which was chosen for Boston Society of Architects Unbuilt Design Award prior to being realized, celebrates the recent designation of Boston’s Fenway as Boston’s first state-wide cultural district The permeable light catching ribbon is made of garden bed-liner fabric and is held in place by an invisible network of stainless steel cables. Its organic free-flowing form mimes the grace and movement of the expanse of tree branches above and is loosely woven between their trunks. ENfold’s spatial layout delineates a natural framework for park-goers and creates a natural "stage" for musical performances and other art happenings. The 500 foot long semi-translucent fabric loops its way throughout the entire park echoing wind and light along its way. The fabric will be recycled and used for the Boston Parks Department’s 2013 growing season.

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SHFT+ALT+DLT> January 13, 2012

SOM returns to LA with a new office to be led by Michael Mann, Paul Danna, and Jose Palacios, all coming en masse from AECOM. The new studio will start out with ten to 40 people in a temporary office, with plans to eventually find a permanent home in downtown LA. The Boston Society of Architects announced the departure of executive director Margaret Wigglesworth. Wigglesworth, who only assumed the ED role in February 2011 and oversaw BSA's move to a new home, will be returning to the commercial real estate sector. In Chicago, Crain's reports that FGB, an architecture firm based in Oak Brook, has acquired Deerfield-based  SRBL, specialists in schools and institutional work, to create a 95-person strong office. On January 18, John Hatfield will join Socrates Sculpture Park in Queens as executive director. Hatfield leaves the New Museum of Contemporary Art, where he has served as deputy director since 2008. Fore Solutions, a green building consulting firm, has joined Thorton Thomasetti to create the Thorton Thomsetti Building Sustainability practice area, to be led by Gunnar Hubbard.