Posts tagged with "BIG-Bjarke Ingels Group":

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These 2015 Holcim Award winners showcase the latest in sustainable design

The Holcim Foundation has announced the three winners in its Global Holcim Awards for Sustainable Construction. The international competition, now in its fourth year, celebrates projects that "deliver tangible benefits to local communities." This year, the winners will collect a total $350,000 between them, and each walk away with a trophy. Take a look at the gold, bronze, and silver winners below. Gold Prize Articulate Site, Colombia By Mario Fernando Camargo Gómez and Luis Orlando Tombé Hurtado of Colectivo 720 From the architects:
This project for a public park centers on creating spaces around and above a series of water reservoirs. Architectural form takes inspiration from the site’s history, surrounding topography, and structure of the existing tanks and pools, resulting in an intervention with minimal environmental impact. Special attention is given to water management, using recycling technologies involving rainwater and grey water harvesting through simple systems for irrigation of the park.
Silver Prize Post-War Collective, Sri Lanka By Milinda Pathiraja and Ganga Ratnayake of Robust Architecture Workshop From the architects:
With the aim of reintegrating former soldiers into post-civil war society, young men from underprivileged backgrounds are trained in building techniques through their involvement in the construction of public buildings – such as this Community Library. The slender building sits lightly in the landscape and wraps around an inner courtyard, taking full advantage of cross ventilation and daylighting. Rammed-earth walls and recycled materials reduce the building’s ecological footprint.
Bronze Prize The Dryline, New York City  By BIG, One Architecture, and Starr Whitehouse Landscape Architects and Planners From the architects:
The Dryline (or BIG U) project addresses the vulnerability of New York City to coastal flooding and proposes a protective ribbon in Southern Manhattan. The master plan uses a raised berm to create a sequence of public spaces along the raised bank at the water’s edge. The infrastructural barrier incorporates a range of neighborhood functions and as a result offers multiple design opportunities, fostering local commercial, recreational, and cultural activities.
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Here’s a sneak peek inside Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

The construction-watching site Field Condition recently got to step inside New York City's most anticipated new building. Yes, of course we are talking about Bjarke Ingels' pyramid-like W57 that is scheduled to open next year. As we have written recently, the structure has topped out and its enclosure is well on its way, but we're just now getting a sense of what things will look like inside. Field Condition wrote: "A grand stair is centrally located in the lobby and brings residents up to the courtyard space, while sheltering the mail room tucked underneath. The courtyard's landscape design will employ a gradient of plantings to evoke a range of spaces, from a meadow to a shaded forest. In addition to the large central courtyard, amenities for the residents include a basketball court, pool, gym, cinema room and golf simulator." While the interiors are far from complete, the courtyard is all framed out, as are the apartments' terraces that fit inside the building's sloped facade. Head on over to Field Condition for more pics inside Bjarke's unique addition to New York City.
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These urban design projects top the AIANY’s 2015 Design Awards

A jury of architects, landscape architects, critics, educators, and planners has named the 35 winning projects of this year's AIA New York Chapter Design Awards. "Each winning project, granted either an 'Honor' or 'Merit' award, was chosen for its design quality, response to its context and community, program resolution, innovation, thoughtfulness, and technique," the AIA said in a statement. "Submitted projects had to be completed by members of the AIA New York Chapter, architects/designers practicing in New York, or be New York projects designed by architects/designers based elsewhere." Take a look at the winning teams in the projects and urban design categories below. Honor Awards Ennead Architects Rethinking Refugee Communities
From the architects: "Can refugee settlements be a benefit to the host community rather than a burden? How can shared resources be employed to benefit both populations as well as foster a more sustainable solution? These questions arise when rethinking a new type of refugee settlement design process that fosters shared infrastructure, resources and economic exchange between incoming refugees and local residents. By creating spatial opportunities for the two populations to develop a beneficial relationship, refugee settlements can enrich the opportunities available to refugees creating more sustainable solutions during the refugees’ displacement."
The Living Hy-Fi Queens, NY
From the architects: "Hy-Fi offers a captivating physical environment and a new paradigm for sustainable architecture. In 2014, we tested and refined a new low-energy building material, manufactured 10,000 compostable bricks, constructed a 13-meter-tall tower, hosted public cultural events for three months, disassembled the structure, composted the bricks, and returned the resulting soil to local community gardens. This successful experiment offers many possibilities for future construction."
MERIT AWARDS BIG – Bjarke Ingels Group Project: Smithsonian Institution South Mall Campus Master Plan Location: Washington, DC CDR Studio Governor's Cup Pavilion New York, NY OBRA Architects Church in the Arctic Tana Bru, Norway raad The Lowline New York, NY
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San Francisco developer nixes BIG-designed Arts Center, plans smaller project

A mixed-use complex designed by New York- and Copenhagen-based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is going to be, well, not quite as big. The San Francisco Mid-Market neighborhood has been quickly revitalizing since 2011, but the largest development in the area, located at 950–974 Market Street, has just been downsized. Mid-Market really began taking off after city officials instituted a tax break—nicknamed “the Twitter tax break” when Twitter famously decided to stay in the city. The effort has been seen as a success: many young tech companies have made the area their home, development proposals are flooding in, and a report by the San Francisco Controller’s office last November showed gains for the city reaching $3.4 million in 2013. But not so much for 950–974 Market Street. The developer responsible for the project, Developer Group I, has told the city that the mixed use complex—with over 300 residences, 250 hotel rooms, and a connecting art space with a green roof for art groups—will now be a smaller hotel and residence. The original central art space, with performance spaces and offices for art groups, would have allowed developers to raise the overall building height from 120 to 200 feet. Disputes over funding have caused tensions: “The city expected the developer to cover all costs, while Group I wanted nonprofit arts groups to chip in 50 percent,” wrote Curbed SF. Still no word on what's next. Updated designs and a revised timeline have not yet been released.
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Breaking! Renderings and video of Bjarke Ingels’ and Heatherwick’s Google headquarters unveiled

Just two days ago, AN brought you word that Copenhagen- and New York–based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and London-based Heatherwick Studio were teaming up to design the new headquarters for Google in Mountain View, California. At the time, it was only being reported that the complex would comprise "a series of canopylike buildings.” Well, now we know what those canopylike buildings will look like and a whole lot more. The Silicon Valley Business Journal first reported on the project design, publishing dramatic renderings and details on how the architects came up with their groundbreaking scheme. "Google—along with a team of prominent architects—has spent more than a year rethinking every assumption about office buildings, tech campuses, and how they relate to their neighborhoods," reported the newspaper. "The result? Four futuristic structures where basic building elements — floors, ceilings and walls — attach or detach from permanent steel frames, forming whole new workspaces of different sizes. With help from small cranes and robots ("crabots"), interiors will transform in hours, rather than months." Hear that? Crabots! A spokesperson at BIG declined to comment further on the design. http://youtu.be/z3v4rIG8kQA These four structures will be draped in glass canopies and are scaled as entire city blocks. The overall campus would also reportedly "see wide swaths of land returned to nature, criss-crossed by walking trails and dotted by plazas, community gardens and oak groves." There would even be a walking path that cuts through a building "letting outsiders inside the Google hive." Joining BIG and Heatherwick on this massive project is the San Francisco–based CMG Landscape Architecture, which is working with Gehry on the Facebook campus. "Today we’re submitting a plan to redevelop four sites—places where we already have offices but hope to significantly increase our square footage—to the Mountain View City Council," David Radcliffe, Google's Real Estate VP writes. "It’s the first time we'll design and build offices from scratch and we hope these plans by Bjarke Ingels at BIG and Thomas Heatherwick at Heatherwick Studio will lead to a better way of working." Google further unveiled the project on its blog this morning, revealing the video above. "The idea is simple. Instead of constructing immoveable concrete buildings, we’ll create lightweight block-like structures which can be moved around easily as we invest in new product areas," Radcliffe said on the blog. The project totals 3.4 million square feet and includes four sites. Google reportedly wants to have the first of these sites, known as "The Landing," completed by 2020. But before construction can start, the city must approve Google's hugely ambitious plans.  
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Check out these five finalists named in the Mies van der Rohe Awards

Five projects have been short-listed in the 2015 European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture—Mies van der Rohe Award. Over the next few weeks, jury members will visit each of the five buildings and a winner will be announced on May 8th at the Mies van der Rohe Pavilion in Barcelona. You can take a look at the five finalists below. Danish Maritime Museum Bjarke Ingels Group Helsingør Denmark
From the architects : The new Danish Maritime Museum is the culmination of a fifteen year vision and master plan to transform Helsingør's former centuries old shipbuilding harbor that had in days past employed thousands but had since fallen on hard times into the city's cultural heart celebrating Helsingør's storied maritime history. The 5,000 m2 subterranean museum is within and built around one of the harbor's dry docks adjacent to Kronborg Castle of Hamlet fame, thus the dry dock itself forms the centerpiece of the museum's collection.
Antinori Winery Archea Associati Florence, Italy
From the competition website: A cultured and illuminated customer has made it possible to pursue, through architecture, the enhancement of the landscape and the surroundings as expression of the cultural and social valence of the place where wine is produced.
Ravensburg Art Museum Lederer Ragnarsdóttir Oei Ravensburg, Germany
From the architects: We formed a structure with largely closed brick facades, for the sake of optimal protection for the art works. By using recycled brickwork we created a connection between the old buildings and the new construction. In this context we are interested in using recycled building materials as part of a sustainable approach. This results in the self-supporting structure of the roof vault. The building is of the first museums ever built in a passive house standard.
Saw Swee Hock Student Centre, London School of Economics O’Donnell + Tuomey London, United Kingdom
From the architects: The proposal was to create an active Student Union, using democratic, everyday, unusual architecture of useful beauty, born out of an understanding of context. The brief was to bring student facilities together under one roof. The multi-functional building includes a venue, pub, learning café, media, prayer, offices, gym, careers, dance studio and social spaces. The brief asked for the “best student building in the UK” and had the aspiration for BREEAM Excellent rating. The design achieved BREEAM Outstanding.
Philarmonic Hall Szczecin Barozzi / Veiga Szczecin, Poland
From the architects: The building houses a symphony hall for 1000 spectators, a hall for chamber music for 200 spectators, a multifunctional space for exhibitions and conferences, and a wide foyer. In its materiality, the building is perceived as a light element: the glass facade, illuminated from inside, allows different perceptions. The exterior austerity and the simple composition of the interior circulation spaces contrast with the expressiveness of the main hall and the concert hall with its gold-leaf covering.
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Bjarke Ingels and Thomas Heatherwick are reportedly designing Google’s new headquarters

Presumably not wanting to be outdone by Facebook and its Frank Gehry–designed digs or Apple and its Norman Foster–designed doughnut, Google has tapped two architectural big hitters for its new Mountain View, California headquarters. According to the New York Times, the company is expected to announce that the Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and Heatherwick Studio are behind the yet-to-be-seen design, which given the two firms' portfolios, should be pretty dramatic. But all we know at this point is that the headquarters will be comprised of "a series of canopylike buildings." No matter what the building—or buildings—looks like, it will likely get some pushback from the community which feels that Google is overextending its footprint in Mountain View. "When Google moved here in 1999," wrote the Times, "it had a dozen employees and a search engine known only to computer aficionados. Now, its 20,000 local employees make it the biggest employer in a city that is bursting at the seams." Two of the most pressing issues that Google and the city will have to hash out moving forward are housing and traffic.
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Bjarke Ingels proposes covering a Swedish powerplant with a colorful geodesic dome

Bjarke Ingels might be using his talents to embellish another European power plant. With his ski slope-topped waste-to-energy plant underway in Copenhagen, the Danish designer has unveiled plans for a biomass cogeneration plant in Uppsala, Sweden. DesignBoom reported that city officials asked Ingels to design the facility that would supplement the region's energy infrastructure during the winter. Since the building will not be used during the summer, BIG opted to create a colorful public amenity. That meant topping the plant in a geodesic rainbow dome which gives the whole thing a very funkadelic greenhouse-y feel.
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Video> Watch Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “Dry Line” form before your eyes

The Bjarke Ingels Group's plan to wrap Lower Manhattan in a landscape berm to keep floodwaters at bay was definitely one of the most architecturally interesting proposals to come from Rebuild By Design, the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s competition to boost resiliency in a post-Sandy world. Last June, the plan—known as "The BIG U" or "The Dry Line"—also became the competitions's biggest winner. To implement BIG's ambitious vision, New York City was allocated $335 million, significantly more money than what was provided for the other five winners. Last fall, Daniel Zarrilli, the director of New York City’s Office of Recovery & Resiliency, told AN that the de Blasio administration was “absolutely committed” to realizing the plan, but that the end result wouldn't necessarily look like what we saw in the renderings. For one, the money would not be spent on the entire circuit, but rather one section of it on the Lower East Side. As the city continues taking steps toward make this plan a reality, a production company called Squint/Opera has released a pretty cool short film about BIG's grand vision. The piece is part of the firm's current exhibition HOT TO COLD at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. If you can't make it to D.C. for the exhibition, we've got you covered and have posted the video above.
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Video> Bjarke Ingels explains his torquing Vancouver House

The Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has released a snazzy video of its eponymous leader explaining the design of Vancouver House, the firm's upcoming mixed-use project in—you guessed it—Vancouver, Canada. As you can see from the photo above, the development is focused around a 52-story tower that appears to be twisting and expanding as it rises. That eye-catching form was actually born out of a setback requirement aimed at limiting development alongside the adjacent Granville Bridge. As Ingels is wont to do, he incorporated the site limitation into his design and ended up creating an entirely unique building. To that end, he said Vancouver House is a "contemporary, Canadian evolution" of the Flatiron building in Manhattan. BIG's building is slated to open in 2018 but you can watch the video about it right this very second.
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Pictorial> Facade rising at Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

One of the most interesting buildings to ever rise in New York City is getting closer and closer to the finish line. We are of course talking about W57Bjarke Ingels' pyramid, or rather, "courtscraper," on Manhattan's Far West Side. The rental building topped out at a peak of 450 feet last year, and now its curtain wall is steadily cloaking the building in a serrated wall of glass. The building was slated to open this year, but according to developer Durst's website, that has been pushed back to early 2016. Take a look at W57's progress below, courtesy of construction-watching blog Field Condition which recently stopped by the site.
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Video> Bjarke Ingels sketches the future of architecture on the floor beneath his feet

The film starts from above. We see a white canvas and not much more. That is, until Bjarke Ingels enters from the upper left hand corner dressed in all black. He tilts his head backward, addressing the camera perched above him, and speaks: “If documentary is to document our world as it already is, fiction is to fantasize about how it could be.” The starchitect adds “architecture is the canvas of our lives.” He then gets down on his hands and knees and starts drawing on the canvas below him. Okay, let’s back up. This artsy video was produced for The Future of Storytelling, an event series that asks "top thinkers" from diverse fields to talk about their work. The program's long-list of advisors includes Charles Renfro from Diller Scofidio + RenfroPaola Antonelli, MoMA's Senior Curator of Architecture & Design and its Director of R & D; designer Todd Oldham; and Tom Wujec of Autodesk. The Ingels video, which is produced with Melcher Media (no relation to the author), has the starchitect traveling around the white canvas sketching out the idiosyncratic projects that have skyrocketed his firm's standing within the profession. As he explains his own work, he diagnoses what he sees as the main problem plaguing architecture today: “So many of our choices today tend to settle with reaffirming the status quo by replicating what’s already there rather than inventing what could happen next.” Ingels draws a series of boxes to signify that type of bland architectural repetitiveness. After he draws an "X" through those boxes and fills the canvas with drawings of BIG's work, Ingels plots a path forward. He says that architects must embody the spirit of gamers who play Minecraft and "build their own worlds and inhabit them through play.” Architecture, he says, must then become "Worldcraft”—“where our knowledge and technology don’t limit us, but rather enable us to turn surreal dreams into inhabitable space. To turn fiction into fact.” And with that, Ingels departs the frame. [h/t Selectism]