Posts tagged with "Atlanta":

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Munching on air pollutants: Would you eat these meringues made from the smog you breathe every day?

How do you coax city slickers to really take notice of air pollution? Start selling meringues, of course. At this year's Ideas City festival in New York City, the Center for Genomic Gastronomy set up a "Smog Tasting" food cart introducing aeroir (a play on terroir for the atmospheric taste of place) meringues infused with recreated urban smog from four cities. Riffing off the fact that egg foam is composed of 90 percent air, the Center’s experiment stemmed from the question of whether batter, which captures air when whipped, could also trap air pollutants. “Smog Tasting grew out of this idea of using food as a biosensor...Perhaps this could be a way of calling attention to the problem,” Zackary Denfield, cofounder at the Center for Genomic Gastronomy, told Fast Company. The meringues were made in small smog chambers the team had designed and fabricated under the advisement of researchers at the University of California Riverside, which trapped grime and chemicals in the egg-white-and-sugar mixture. The four less-than-tantalizing recipes included the “classic London peasouper,” a sampling of the Los Angeles atmosphere circa 1950, air from a present-day air-quality warning event in Atlanta, and California’s Central Valley agricultural smog, the latter a carcinogenic cocktail of ammonia and amines from feedlot manure lagoons and other organic waste. Scientists formed each smog type by mixing different chemical precursors and “baking” them under UV light. The result was a slightly yellowish dessert which imparted a noxious aftertaste initially masked by the sugar. “Most people ask ‘Is it safe to eat?’ and we reply ‘Is it safe to breathe?’” Denfield said. “We think that when people are laughing they are thinking, and we get a lot of nervous laughter.” According to the Center, capturing smog in edible form transforms the “unconscious” process of breathing into the “visceral” act of eating. Inspiring disgust is one way of garnering attention. Conceptualized in 2012 by college students in Bangalore, the project was introduced in May to health ministers and World Health Organization delegates in Geneva. Its showing in New York City by the Center for Genomic Gastronomy in collaboration with the Finnish Cultural Institute of New York was part of the Center’s larger scheme of examining the health implications of where our food is sourced. In a post on their dedicated blog, Edible Geography, the Center wrote that according to scientists the Center had consulted with, the human digestive system is better-equipped to catalyze chemicals than the respiratory system.
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Two outdated Atlanta bridges get a major design redo thanks to these winning design teams

Winners of the Atlanta Bridgescape Competition were announced last week at the AIA Conference that was held in the city. The competition, launched earlier this year, asked multidisciplinary teams to reimagine two of Atlanta’s outdated bridges with a budget of about $3 million. Hometown designers Max Neiswander and Luke Kvasnicka won with (sin)uosity, their plan to remake Midtown’s 10th Street Bridge with plantings, fresh bike lanes, and a curving, ribbed shell. Roger DeWeese, head of the Atlanta-based Peachtree Architects, also earned top honors with Organic Canopy, a vision to top Courtland/McGill Bridge with a geodesic dome–like structure. This plan actually won twice as it was selected by the competition's blind jury and the general public through the People's Choice Award. The other People's Choice Award went to Green City Spectator by the Poland-based KAMJZ Architects along with ARUP. Perhaps the most adventurous design, this scheme tops the bridge with what appears to be farming areas, and also has a zigzagging structure similar to to HNTB's vision for Los Angeles’ 6th Street Viaduct. “Competitions are about vision and big ideas,” said competition manager Tony Rizzuto, Chair in the Department of Architecture at Kennesaw State University, in a statement. "They have the potential to take us out of our comfort zone to see possibilities we never imaged. They provide a catalyst for discourse on public space and promote the pursuit of better design.” The ideas-centered competition was sponsored by Central Atlanta Progress, Midtown Alliance, and the Atlanta chapter of the AIA.
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INTRODUCING THE FIRST STOREFRONT TO DELIVER A MODERN ALL-GLASS AESTHETIC WITH 1” INSULATING GLASS

  U.S. Aluminum’s big unveil is finally here. After years of R + D and testing, our engineers are proud to debut the Entice™ Series, an innovative new entrance system with features and components that have classified it as the first premium storefront of its kind. If you’re designing a premium exterior retail space, the Entice™ Series Entrance System is the only solution that retains the elegant appearance of a monolithic frameless glass entrance with minimal vertical lines and the unique ability to support door handle hardware on 1” insulating glass panels. This system is designed for use with all high solar and thermal efficient glass options including low-E coatings and tints. Entice™ delivers contemporary heavy glass storefront aesthetics while satisfying new energy code requirements and ASHRAE 90.1 air infiltration criteria. For added performance, patent pending vertical stiles with ultra narrow sightlines and door rails feature heavy-duty thermally broken cladding that provides U-Factors as low as 0.33. Patent pending SEAL-LOC Mechanically Clamping Seals also provide easy fabrication and glass replacement. This innovative system has an impressive pedigree, endowed with trusted CRL-U.S. Aluminum technologies, an AAMA 101 Performance Class LC-PG25-SHD, and a design that protects buildings from air/water infiltration, extreme temperatures, and mediocrity. The Entice™ Series will debut at AIA Expo 2015 in Atlanta, booth #1959.
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PeopleForBikes Issues Green Light For Six Cities Seeking Improved Bike Infrastructure

A list of over 100 cities has been whittled down to six. PeopleForBikes has announced the latest cities that will be the focus of the 2014 iteration of the Green Lane Project, an initiative that promotes urban bike infrastructure. The decision means that beginning in April, Atlanta, Boston, Denver, Indianapolis, Pittsburgh, and Seattle will all be on the receiving end of expert assistance, training and support in efforts to become increasingly bike-friendly. The project's director Martha Roskowski said that all the selected cities demonstrated "ambitious goals and a vision for bicycling supported by their elected officials and communities." Pittsburgh and Seattle's inclusion comes as each takes steps towards establishing bike share programs within their borders. Boston is already in possession of such a system. A major focus of the Green Lane initiative is to increase the number of protected bike lanes, and Seattle, Indianapolis, and Atlanta are already in possession of lanes included in PeopleForBikes' Best Of List for 2013. Since the program was launched in 2012, the number of such lanes within the US has nearly doubled, rising from 80 to 142. Half of this growth can be found in the Green Lane Project's six original focus cities: Austin, Chicago, Memphis, Portland, San Francisco, and Washington, D.C. [Via Streetsblog USA.]
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Discover the Diversity of Glass at the Architects Forum Glass+Performance at GlassBuild America

On September 11th, the Architects Forum Glass+Performance in Atlanta, Georgia presents some of the biggest names in architecture for a symposium of diverse programs, esteemed speakers, and informative dialogues, all in the name of glass. As part of GlassBuild America: The Glass, Window & Door Exposition, The Architect’s Newspaper and Glass Magazine have teamed up to develop a spectacular lineup addressing the multiplicity of uses of architectural and decorative glass. Registration allows attendees access to the exciting events of the day, including a keynote address by architect Neil M. Denari, as well as entrance to the three day GlassBuild America Trade Show Floor and five Continuing Education Units from the American Institute of Architects. With a diverse program featuring Emil Hoogendoorn of John Moriarty & Associates, Philip Vourvoulis of Triview Glass Industries, Peter Arbour of seele, and similarly esteemed designers, architects, and innovators within the high-performance glass construction and design industry, this exciting event will draw professionals and experts for a forum of concentrated thought and experience. Throughout the day-long symposium, the Architects Forum Glass+Performance provides opportunities for networking and dialogue, and attendees may continue these engagements with those in demo of cutting-edge technologies on the GlassBuild America trade room floor. Lunch is provided and conversation is encouraged. Topics in presentation include: · Architectural Glass Materials Panel · Functional Appeal and Aesthetic Challenges of Glass Design for Today's Building Facades · Structural Glass: Ancient Material Modern Treatment · The Biggest Glass in Miami Dade County: Construction of the Miami Art Museum Facades Register today for a value offer and join the conversation in glass. See the complete September 11th tentative schedule here.
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Enclos’ High Performance Facades Series Focuses on Glass, Facade Technology

Glass-clad, cable-net structures are one of today's leading forms of high-transparency facade technology. Since 2009, Enclos has been an authority in the design, engineering, fabrication, and assembly of custom curtain wall systems and structural glass facades. The company has published a number of reports about building skin systems. Volume 1: Skylights of the Facade TecNotes Series focuses on glass in overhead applications and the unique opportunities it brings. On September 11th, Enclos’ Mic Patterson will join AN to discuss glass facades at GlassBuild America: The Architects Forum in Atlanta. Mr. Patterson will share several examples that show how optimal transparency and aesthetic elegance can work together. He will discuss projects such as 51 Louisiana in Washington, D.C., two existing buildings that have been joined by a glass-clad atrium, and Station Place: Security & Exchange Commission Headquarters, also in Washington, D.C., which consists of a 55-foot-long and 60-foot-wide skylight. Mr. Patterson has lectured internationally on various aspects of advanced facade technology and is the author of Structural Glass Facades and Enclosures.
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The Architects Forum Welcomes Neil M. Denari to GlassBuild America

Join AN, in collaboration with Glass Magazine, at the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta on September 11 for The Architect's Forum Glass+Performance, an exciting symposium featuring keynote speaker Neil M. Denari. In addition to lunch and three-day access to the GlassBuild America trade show floor, the gathering place for North American glass, window, and door industries, attendees will have the opportunity to learn from Denari, who has taught at UCLA, Columbia, the Bartlett, UC Berkeley, Princeton, and Harvard GSD, and is the author of two bestselling books, Interrupted Projections (1996) and Gyroscopic Horizons (1999). Symposium keynote Neil Denari earned his B.Arch. at the University of Houston and his M.Arch. from Harvard University. Upon graduation, Denari worked as a technical intern in Paris for Aerospatiale Helicoptres (now Airbus). Denari relocated to New York in 1983 where he worked as a senior designer at James Stewart Polshek and Partners (now Ennead Architects), presented his speculative work at many museums, and was the youngest member of 40 Architects Under 40 in 1986. Since then, Denari has led a noteworthy career as an educator and is a tenured Professor in the Architecture and Urban Design Department at UCLA. He has also amassed a lengthy list of awards: in 2002, he received the Richard Recchia Award and the Samuel F.B. Morse Medal for architecture from the National Academy of Design in New York. In 2008, he received an Academy Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Then, in 2009, he received a Fellowship from the United States Artists organization. Two years later, Denari earned Los Angeles AIA’s Gold Medal, the highest honor for an individual architect. His firm Neil M. Denari Architects is based in Los Angeles. A registered architect in New York and California and member of the American Institute of Architects, his position as featured keynote at The Architects Forum will make for an exceptionally educational Glass+Performance symposium.
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New at GlassBuild: The Architect’s Forum

denari_glassbuild_01 GlassBuild is the largest trade show for the glass industry in the United States, showcasing the latest in glass products, cutting-edge technology, and educational workshops. On September 11 in Atlanta, The Architect's Newspaper is teaming up with Glass Magazine to create an intensive one day workshop designed specifically for architects. Featuring Neil Denari as a keynote speaker, The Architect's Forum  will include case studies and technical workshops on both high performance and decorative glass. Presentations on materials and guided show tours compliment an in-depth look at the new glass facade of Herzog & de Meuron's Miami Art Museum followed by a presentation on advances in structural glass. Learn more and register today here.