Posts tagged with "Antoni Gaudi":

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Extension to Gaudí-designed school showcases ceramic fabric sunshade

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The expansion of the Teresian School—an historic, late 19th-century Barcelona school designed by Antoni Gaudí—raised a formidable architectural challenge: how to create a modern academic space without undermining or distracting from original masterwork. To meet this challenge, PICH Architects designed an extension that reflects the massing of adjacent buildings while protecting views and access to the historic building. The siting of the new building allowed for an overall restructuring of programmatic space within the existing facility to provide for expanded academic and extracurricular schedules and performances. The new facade showcases an innovative architectural "textile" product that is composed of ceramic panels integrated into a flexible stainless steel mesh or grid. This emerging construction technology offers variable color and compositional options in a lightweight, flexible assembly. Felipe Pich-Aguilera, owner of PICH Architects, saw this product as capable of creating a dialogue between Gaudí's original structural brick and terra-cotta ornamentation, and contemporary construction techniques. "The building had to speak about its time without turning its back on the very texture of the existing building, so we’ve opted for a woven ceramic facade—which makes a large lattice—toward the street and light and bright elements for the interior of the school. This double skin, which shades the interior thermally, allows freedom and flexibility in the distribution of windows and functionally necessary opaque elements."
  • Facade Manufacturer Shildan Group
  • Architects PICH Architects
  • Facade Installer TEYCO Construction Company
  • Facade Consultants Cátedra de Cerámica UIC (Vicente Sarrablo)
  • Location Barcelona
  • Date of Completion 2014
  • System flexible ceramic sheets over steel frame
  • Products Fabrik (ceramic pieces and flexible steel mesh)
The system consists of salmon-colored ceramic pieces, which are cooked with biogas (clean fuel whose use in ceramics production reduces CO2 emissions by approximately 16,700 tons per year) and combined in a lattice grid through a metal mesh. The assembly of the facade, which has an area of over 3,200-square-feet, was accomplished within five days, substantially reducing construction time versus traditional, piece-by-piece application, and resulting in significant savings in costs. The product celebrates a versatility in the construction of large surfaces, providing high accuracy since the metal mesh allows joints between the pieces to always remain aligned. The facade is "hung" by fastening stainless steel anchors, which counter the effects of wind, to adjacent metallic meshes. The system is designed to absorb lateral forces from wind and earthquakes and has been detailed to incorporate "anti-fall" backup measures to ensure loose tiles have multiple degrees of attachment to the steel lattice grid. The new ceramic textile was based on the principles of textile architecture. It is a flexible and adaptable material that combines two very different components: steel and ceramic. Serving as a successful example of corporate and academic collaboration, the material was originally created by Vicente Sarrablo, Doctor of Architecture and Director of the Ceramics Department at the International University of Catalonia, and was later developed by leading companies in the Spanish construction industry, Piera Ecocerámica and Cerámica Malpesa. After popularity in European markets, the product has recently made it's U.S. debut at the AIA Convention earlier this year, and is being manufactured by Shildan under the name "Fabrik."
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Antoni Gaudi Could Become Patron Saint of Architects

For years, the Pritzker Prize has been the gold-standard in architectural recognition. It’s like the Super Bowl ring, or the Oscar for Best Picture, or whatever Joey Chestnut wins for downing 60-some hot dogs at Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest. (It’s gotta be a sash, right? It’s probably a sash.) This is the hallowed ground where the Pritzker lives. But it could soon be trumped in a big way. In a big enough way that even knighthood can't quite compare. Hear that, Sir Norman Foster? Local Catalonia radio station RAC1, reported that Antoni Gaudi—already known as “God’s Architect”—could be beatified within the next year by Pope Francis, making him the patron saint of architects. The Local, an English-language news outlet in Europe, reported, "the campaign has been headed by the Pro Beatification for Antoni Gaudí Association, who for the past ten years worked hand in hand with the Vatican compiling hundreds of documents about Gaudi’s life and testimonies by those who knew him.” Gaudi was born in the mid-19th century in Catalonia and went on to create some of Barcelona's most celebrated work. If you're not familiar with his work, ask your cousin who went on the free Gaudi walking tour while studying abroad. Beatification is the third step out of four in the full canonization process, but as the Local noted, while Gaudi will probably reach the veneration stage, "the fact that there’s no proof yet he carried out a miracle may prevent him from being fully canonized.” With construction on one of Gaudi's most famous landmarks—the Sagrada Familia in Barcelona—carrying on now for some 132 years, there's no word yet from Vatican officials as to whether simply finishing the cathedral will count as a miracle. [h/t Huffington Post.]

Video> AN Sharing Our Architectural Expertise on CNN International

In a segment on CNN International on the ongoing work on Gaudi's Sagrada Familia, The Architect's Newspaper was pleased to be asked to comment on architectural icons around the world. In this abbreviated clip, executive editor Alan G. Brake said that iconic buildings should be unique but still capture the spirit of their place. Later in the segment (not included), he went on to argue that iconic buildings add to cities but don't make cities great on their own. People return to Paris again and again because it's a great city, not to see the Eiffel Tower repeatedly. We look forward to seeing Gaudi's vision completed in 2026.
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Video> Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia Awash in Psychedelic Light

Residents of Barcelona had the opportunity to see Antoni Gaudi’s 120-year-old La Sagrada Familia in a new light recently as Montreal-based media studio and light artists Moment Factory projection mapped a multimedia display over the cathedral's facade. While Gaudi's signature stone carvings portraying dripping stone, fanciful plant forms, and intricate religious displays in their normally sand-colored hue are usually enough to dazzle the viewers eye, the gaudy splash provided one psychedelic experience. The fifteen minute show, Ode à la vie, projected clouds and cascading waterfalls on the church’s facade, complete with fog and a soundtrack by Anthony Rozankovic and Misteur Valaire. The display attracted a crowed of 32,000 people who were showered with thousands of shimmering LED butterflies. Inspiration came from Gaudi himself who envisioned the cathedral full of color upon its completion, estimated for 2026. The show certainly mirrored Gaudi’s style that greeted an old traditional world with fantastical modern design.
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Quick Clicks> Libeskind Collapse, Rahm′s DOT Pick, Gaudi Attacked, and Bamboo in Wyoming

Watch for Falling Libeskinds. The breaking news of the day from Building Design: Daniel Libeskind's $555 million Westside retail center in Bern, Switzerland has collapsed for a second time in three years. An elevated swimming pool fell into the building injuring two people. An investigation is pending. In 2008, shortly after the building was completed, the roof of a fast food restaurant inside the center collapsed, injuring two children. Transporting Chicago. Transportation Nation reports today that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has tapped Gabe Klein to head up the city's DOT. Widely viewed as a pro-bike kind of guy in his former role as head of Washington D.C.'s DOT, Klein helped launch a bike-share program, expand bike lanes, and install electric car charging stations across the city. Could more alternative transportation be in store for the Windy City? Gaudi Burns. An arsonist set fire to Antoni Gaudí's Segrada Familia in Barcelona said the Guardian. The cathedral's sacristy was destroyed and the crypt heavily damaged during the attack. Some 1,500 tourists were evacuated and four treated for smoke inhalation. Wisconsin Bamboo. Sarah F. Cox talks with NYC-based architecture firm Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis for Curbed about a recently completed student center at the University of Wyoming which includes a stunningly intricate bamboo-lattice screen.
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Quick Clicks> Frank′s Party, Little Cooper, Gaudi′s Church, and Carnegie Saved

Happy Birthday, Frank! Over the weekend, Frank Gehry celebrated his 82nd birthday on top of New York. New York by Gehry, that is. The penthouse unit on the 76th floor of 8 Spruce Street, Gehry's first skyscraper, was filled with celebrities (think Bono) and starchitects (Robert A.M. Stern and more). Check out a gallery after the jump. Little House on the Bowery. Fred Bernstein writes for Design Observer about a little brick house at the center of a giant preservation fight along New York's Bowery. The demolition has been stopped for now, but Bernstein argues that the building's real value is in the present, not in its history. All in the Familia. Oscar Tusquets Blanca writes for Domus about Antoni Gaudí's under construction Segrada Família in Barcelona. Blanca recalls, interspersed with some amazing photography, when he once advocated abandoning the project decades ago but points out how is opinion has changed today. Carnegie Wrecking Ball. Ephemeral New York reminds us of a one-time plan to raze the famed Carnegie Hall for a bright red skyscraper set behind a sunken plaza. The March 31, 1960 wrecking date was averted at the last minute by the efforts of the Committee to Save Carnegie Hall. Click a thumbnail to start the slideshow. [ Photos by Philip Greenberg.]