Posts tagged with "57th Street":

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Renderings finally revealed for the base of the Western Hemisphere’s tallest tower

With all the attention focused on the impossible height of New York's new crop of supertalls, it's easy to forget that even skyscrapers have a tether to earth. Renderings were recently revealed for the base of Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill's 1,550-foot-tower, which, when complete, will be the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere. Most mere mortals will never ascend to Central Park Tower's 95th floor, let alone live in one of its 182 condominium units, but it will be possible to go shopping at its base. The anchor tenant, Seattle–based Nordstrom, will occupy 363,000 square feet over eight floors: Three below and five aboveground. James Carpenter Design Associates created the undulating glass facade that runs up seven stories from the sidewalk. The sprawling department store will be Nordstrom's first Manhattan flagship, but it won't be contained to 217 West 57th Street, The Seattle Times reports. As seen in the two renderings below, the retail footprint will blend new and old by extending into three adjacent prewar buildings. Nordstrom's, along with the rest of the building, is expected to open in 2019.
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The tallest crane ever in New York City was just installed to build SHoP’s Manhattan supertall

The tallest freestanding crane ever erected in New York City is now in place to help SHoP's bronze, glass, and terracotta 57th Street tower rise to 1,428 feet. For those doing the math, that's about 32 feet taller than Raphael Viñoly's 432 Park and almost 100 feet shorter than the roof over at the Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill–designed "Central Park Tower," the supertall formerly known as "Nordstrom Tower." JDS Development, the company behind SHoP's 111 West 57th Street tower, told YIMBY that the building's crane was erected over the weekend and tops out at over 220 feet. The building is slated to be completed in 2017 with apartments starting at $14 million. So at least enjoy the view of the crane, because chances are slim you'll be enjoying the views from inside the tower.
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Was Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park tower inspired by an architect-designed trashcan?

AN had the unique opportunity to walk around the top floor of the supertall 432 Park Avenue tower, where the full-floor penthouse with a $95 million view of Central Park is nearing completion. A Saudi billionaire, Fawaz Al Hokair, was recently announced as the buyer. Ironically, The Real Deal has reported this week that it was also announced by one of the architects—at a Cornell Center for Real Estate and Finance lecture in December—that the Rafael Viñoly design was inspired by, wait for it, a trashcan. 432-park-trash-can2 It's no ordinary trash can, however. The alleged inspiration is a design by Viennese Secession/ Wiener Werkstätte mastermind Josef Hoffmann. His gridded designs represented a new rational, rigorous way of composing objects in the beginnings of modern industrial design. Today, apparently, they are being copied at a larger scale for entire building. The geometric purity of the tower originally looked to us like it came from Aldo Rossi, but Hoffmann makes more sense, especially given the urban context/political ambiguity of the building. In the lecture, Harry Macklowe, who co-developed the building with the CIM Group, revealed that Renzo Piano was also considered for the tower but didn’t work out. The idea for a tall building with a pure form came from Piano, and Macklowe carried that idea forward through the project. “Renzo Piano had said to me—if you have a pure architectural form like a square and you uphold the integrity of that architectural form you will build a beautiful building,” Macklowe to the Real Deal. “That stayed in my mind, and I had considered Renzo Piano for the architect, but it didn’t work out for several reasons.” While the world's super-elite who will soon call the tower home likely would snub the idea of living like an albeit more sophisticated Oscar the Grouch, they might do well to pick up their own Hoffmann trashcan, available for a cool $225 from the Neue Galerie.
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Take a look at the view from the tippy top of Rafael Viñoly’s 432 Park, the supertall tower that will soon house the world’s billionaires

AN got a rare look at the penthouse of 432 Park, Rafael Viñoly's soon-to-be-tallest residential building in the western hemisphere. After a six-minute ride on the construction lift, expansive, $95 million views open up in a 360 degree panorama from large square windows along all four sides of the full-floor apartment. While the building is still under construction, it has already topped out some 1,396 feet above New York City's sidewalks below. The 85-story tower is expected to be completed early next year, but some of the lower floors will be available for move-in this fall, if you are interested. Deborah Berke is handling the interior architecture in the building. Here are some pictures from the six penthouses at the top of Viñoly’s incredibly tall building on Manhattan’s Billionaires' Row.
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Eavesdrop> Hocus Pocus: Leak in David Copperfield’s pool sends water flowing through his 57th Street penthouse

David Copperfield can saw himself in half, fly around theaters, and even make the Statue of Liberty disappear, but he cannot keep gallons of water inside his penthouse pool in Manhattan. The New York Post reported that a pump inside the magician’s lap-pool recently malfunctioned, causing water to drain into his four-story penthouse. Making matters worse, the water traveled from Copperfield’s place on the 57th floor all the way down to apartments on the 20th floor. Copperfield was in Las Vegas at the time, but was reportedly very distraught to hear what happened to his neighbors—sorry, his art collection. “David was terrified,” Ted Blumberg, Copperfield’s lawyer, told the Post, “because he has these rare, vintage Coney Island machines, which are priceless, irreplaceable antiques, including a fortune teller, strength testers, an electric shock machine, and shooting galleries.” Back in 2010, the magician had his apartment's windows blown in by a mysterious gust of wind, sending shards plummeting to the streets below. It sounds like the place might just be cursed, or something.
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In just a few years, this tower by Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill will be the tallest residential building on Planet Earth

The tallest of Manhattan's rising supertall towers has been revealed—and believe it or not, the building that will make New York's current crop of skyscrapers look like walkups is very, very glassy. Real estate blog New York YIMBY obtained the first official renderings for 217 West 57th Street—the under-construction building that has been dubbed the "Nordstrom Tower" for the department store that will occupy its base. Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill designed the tower and Extell is developing the project. The roof of the hotel and condo tower will reach 1,479 feet, but the building doesn't stop there—no, it just keeps climbing. When all is said and done, Nordstrom Tower's spire will stand at 1,775 feet tall—just one foot below One World Trade Center's very historically-minded height of 1,776 feet (spire included). But since One World Trade has a significantly taller spire, the 57th Street supertall is actually the bigger building. And since Midtown's elevation above sea level is about 70 feet higher than Lower Manhattan, YIMBY noted that the new building will actually reach 1,850 feet above sea level—making it the tallest residential building on planet earth. Since the building won't be completed until 2018, it's probably best for people to get their Central Park sunshine now, as the new crop of 57th Street towers will be throwing some literal shade on New York's backyard.
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Here’s a sneak peek inside Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

The construction-watching site Field Condition recently got to step inside New York City's most anticipated new building. Yes, of course we are talking about Bjarke Ingels' pyramid-like W57 that is scheduled to open next year. As we have written recently, the structure has topped out and its enclosure is well on its way, but we're just now getting a sense of what things will look like inside. Field Condition wrote: "A grand stair is centrally located in the lobby and brings residents up to the courtyard space, while sheltering the mail room tucked underneath. The courtyard's landscape design will employ a gradient of plantings to evoke a range of spaces, from a meadow to a shaded forest. In addition to the large central courtyard, amenities for the residents include a basketball court, pool, gym, cinema room and golf simulator." While the interiors are far from complete, the courtyard is all framed out, as are the apartments' terraces that fit inside the building's sloped facade. Head on over to Field Condition for more pics inside Bjarke's unique addition to New York City.
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Pictorial> Facade rising at Bjarke Ingels’ Manhattan “courtscraper”

One of the most interesting buildings to ever rise in New York City is getting closer and closer to the finish line. We are of course talking about W57Bjarke Ingels' pyramid, or rather, "courtscraper," on Manhattan's Far West Side. The rental building topped out at a peak of 450 feet last year, and now its curtain wall is steadily cloaking the building in a serrated wall of glass. The building was slated to open this year, but according to developer Durst's website, that has been pushed back to early 2016. Take a look at W57's progress below, courtesy of construction-watching blog Field Condition which recently stopped by the site.
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New renderings and details of SHoP’s supertall Midtown tower

Despite concerns that New York City’s high-end housing bubble is about to burst, the supertall towers that have come to symbolize that upper-echelon of the market keep coming, one after the other. Now, with One57 open, and 432 Park topped off, SHoP’s 111 W. 57th Street—widely seen as the most attractive of the bunch—is preparing to head skyward. As the tower begins its roughly 1,400-foot climb, new renderings and details of the project have surfaced. The new information about the highly-anticipated tower was divulged by Simon Koster, principal at the JDS Development Group, at the Municipal Arts Society's 2014 Summit for New York. CityRealty's 6sqft blog was there and reports back on the latest plans. Along with a floorplan of a typical unit in the building, 6sqft unveiled some new, detailed images of the tower's skin. On its east and west-facing sides, 111 W. 57th,  is clad in a terra cotta panels separated by glass, and bronze filigree details. The other two sides of the building are primarily glass—to provide optimal views of Central Park to the north and Lower Manhattan to the south. For residents of 111 W. 57th Street, this presents a conundrum: which view to pick. Just kidding, no it doesn't—apartments take up entire floors. When complete, the tower won't just be one of the tallest buildings in New York, it will be the skinniest skyscraper in the world with a floor plate of only 60 feet by 80 feet.
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In Construction> Bjarke Ingels’ “court-scraper” tops out on 57th Street

When we talk about the batch of luxury towers coming to 57th Street, we’re typically talking about very tall, very skinny, very glassy buildings. But not, of course, when it comes to W57—Bjarke Ingels' very pyramid-y addition to the street he calls a "court-scraper" for its combination of the European courtyard building with a New York skyscraper. Last time we checked in on Bjarke's pyramid—sorry, Durst would prefer we all call it a “tetrahedron”—it was only a few stories high. That was back in June, and since then, the sure-looks-like-a-pyramid has topped out at 450 feet and crews have begun installing its facade. Field Condition, a site that tracks construction projects around New York City, recently visited the tower and documented all that progress. When W57 is completed next year, it will contain 709 rental apartment (20 percent of which will be below market-rate) and 45,000 square feet of commercial and retail space. The structure will also have a massive courtyard cut into its sloping side.
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New Drawings Appear for 225 West 57th Street – The Tallest Residential Building in the World

New details have emerged on New York’s latest, tallest, super-tall skyscraper—the Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill–designed tower rising on, where else, 57th Street. Real estate blog NY YIMBY has uncovered new drawings for 225 West 57th Street, which will rise to a height within one foot of One World Trade Center. The 1,775-foot-tall tower, known as the Nordstrom Tower for the store that will anchor its base, will have a glass curtain wall accentuated by aluminum louvers and steel fins. There have been limited renderings for the project from the start, and the latest drawings only hint at what is next. Here's what we do know: as noted by YIMBY, at its height, Nordstrom Tower has a higher roof than the Willis Tower in Chicago and is slated to become the tallest residential building… in the world.
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Bjarke Ingels’ Hudson River Pyramid Growing on 57th Street

[beforeafter] 01-big57-archpaper 02-big57-archpaper[/beforeafter]   The so-called "courtscraper"—a marriage of the European courtyard block and the American skyscraper—by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) is rapidly rising on New York City's Hudson River waterfront. Officially called West 57 and under development by the Durst Organization, the 870,000-square-foot rental tower will stand 32-stories tall on the western edge of the starchitecture-studded 57th Street. BIG recently shared this construction view showing progress as of June 9, and we overlaid a model of the finished tower over top of it to give it a little more scale. View the before and after by sliding back and forth on the image above. The building is expected to be complete in 2015.