Posts tagged with "3D Printing":

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MAD Museum gets Out of Hand

A cross-section of postdigital design work illustrates the role of parametrics in the built environment.

Spawned from his 2011 show on Patrick Jouin, Museum of Arts & Design (MAD) curator Ronald Labaco conceived Out of Hand as a more comprehensive show that clarified the role of digital design, from its capabilities to its significance in our daily lives. “People just didn’t get it,” said Labaco of Jouin’s 2011 MAD show. “Unless you’re immersed in it, it can be hard to understand so I thought if we showed something like this in the galleries again, we needed to provide information that can be digested more clearly.” Staged across three floors of the museum, with two exterior sculptures, Labaco said the show is an important program for MAD among other New York art institutions like MoMA, Cooper Hewitt, and the New Museum. The goal to raise awareness of 3D printing is timely, by chance. “Paolo Antonelli’s Design and the Elastic Mind, and two shows from Material Connection were complements to my show for the uninitiated,” Labaco explained. Out of Hand’s broad scope includes digital designing and fabrication processes like CNC milling, digital weaving and knitting, laser cutting, and 3D printing to display how these technologies influence the built environment. “It’s a historical look at the last 8 years and works from as early as 2005 are incorporated because, in my mind, that was when the major shift between rapid prototyping and 3D printing really occurred,” said Labaco.
  • Curator Ronald Labaco
  • Location Museum of Arts & Design, New York
  • Date October 2013– July 2014
  • Materials ceramic, concrete, polyurethane, resin, PVC, metal, gypsum, wax, paper, wood, jacquard
  • Process water jet cutting, laser cutting, laser sintering, 3D printing, digital weaving
Organized in six themes, a cross-section of traditional methods and new design capabilities are illustrated by architects crafting art, artists doing design, and photographers making sculpture. Approximately half a dozen pieces were commissioned for the show while others were an extension of existing works: For example, a chair by Jan Habraken evolved into the more comprehensive Charigenics. Placards for each piece call out production methods, from 3D printing (10 materials are featured) to digital knitting, underscoring the multi-step creation process to make the point that digital design isn’t only press-and-print. And many of the show’s pieces are a combination of old-world handcrafting and newer digital geometries and computations. Pieces like Rapid Racer, Bosch’s 3D-printed vehicle fabricated over 10 days and weighing just 29 pounds, and Zaha Hadid’s Liquid Glacial "Smoke", a coffee table CNC-milled from polished plexiglass, illustrate the functional role of digital design. Data input is actively incorporated through two interactive pieces from Francios Brument, for which he developed his own scripting, as well as a Shapeways workshop that is open to the public. Traditional forms are realized by new methods in Nendo’s 3D-printed paper boxes that are lacquered with traditional urushi for a ringed faux bois. Other featured artists, architects, and designers include Richard DuPont, Greg Lynn, Anish Kapoor, Marc Newson, Frank Stella, Daniel Libeskind, and Maya Lin. Just as dynamic as the digital disciplines themselves, new pieces are being added throughout the show’s run. Look for a new piece from Iris Van Herpen by mid-November. Out of Hand will remain on view through July 6, 2014.
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Web-Based 3D Printing Hubs Make Everyone a Designer

The rise of 3D printing, the design and creation of objects using a material printer, is currently hindered by accessibility. Few own personal printers or know where to go to use one. However, according to Lara Piras of PSFK, commercially viable 3D printing is now a possibility with Netherlands-based 3D Hubs. The online company allows at-home designers to connect with locals who own 3D printers, arrange for payment for the printing of their creations, and then receive their material products, ideally without leaving their community. Co-founders Bram de Zwart and Brian Garret envision their system as a reinstatement of local production, a reaction to current globalization, which they believe paints laborers as “faceless links in a complex and obscure global process.” Their 3D printing hubs allow citizens to design products and then see their production, means and end, face-to-face. After uploading designs to the 3D Hubs website, at-home designers can search for 3D printer owners in their area, arrange for payment to print their designs, and then pick up the finished product a bike ride or short walk away.
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Meet Ronald Rael of Emerging Objects at Facades+PERFORMANCE San Francisco on 7/12!

We are excited to announce that Ronald Rael, founding partner of Emerging Objects, will join Ronnie Parsons of Mode Collective at our facades+ PERFORMANCE conference in San Francisco in less than two weeks! Emerging Objects is a pioneering 3D printing design and research company that reaches beyond using plastic and focuses on using innovative, sustainable, and recyclable materials—paper, nylon, salt, wood, clay, acrylic, and cement polymer—to create 3D printing objects for the built environment, including facade elements such as "The Wave Curtain." Facades+ Rael and Parsons will co-instruct the "Hands-On 3D Printing (Rhino3D/Makerbot)" Technology Workshop on July 12th. By registering for this full-day workshop participants will not only earn 8 LU AIA CE credits but they will also explore and discuss the differences between the various types of 3D printing technologies, including Fused Deposition Modeling and Stereolithography. This hands-on workshop presents professionals and students with a rare opportunity to develop and challenge their 3D printing skills and learn how to bring their unique digital models to life in the form of actual physical products. The emergence of the 3D printer has not only significantly transformed the fields of architecture, interior design, and product design but with the development of user-friendly, affordable 3D printers, it is revolutionizing the world one physical prototype at a time. 3D printing is a valuable skill that architects and engineers must learn if they want to remain on the cutting-edge of technology. Join Ronald Rael and Ronnie Parsons at facades+ PERFORMANCE as they delve into the world of 3D printing. Learn more about our workshops and register for the conference here! 
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In 3D-Printed Sugar

Fabrikator

A team of SCI-Arc–trained architects establish a sweet set up in Southern California.

Liz and Kyle Von Hasseln wanted to bake a birthday cake for a friend but, unfortunately, their rented apartment didn't have an oven. Not to be deterred, the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) alumni hit upon a solution that would leave most bakers scratching their heads: They decided to 3D print one. Earlier that year, the couple had been awarded the school's inaugural Gehry Prize for their work on Phantom Geometry, a 5-axis fabrication study of UV-cured resin within a shallow vat system that responded to real-time feed back and feed-forward mechanisms. "In our graduate work, we were really interested in the way free form fabrication would influence architecture," Kyle recently told AN. "We thought a lot about the potential for the intersection of culture and technology that would be accessible to the public, so printing sugar was that."
  • Fabricators Sugar Lab
  • Designers Liz and Kyle Von Hasseln
  • Location Los Angeles
  • Date of Completion 2012
  • Material sugar
  • Process Maya, 3D printing
The Von Hasselns began working on a combination of SCI-Arc machinery and printers they built themselves. The initial ambition to 3D-print the entire cake was scaled-back to 3D printing just a sparkling cake topper made only from sugar, a process that Liz likened to a micro architectural challenge. As with any material, working with sugar presented inherent propensities and limitations. However, Liz said the process of working with food had its own distinct challenges. "Because it's a food object, we've found it becomes important to consider those inherent characteristics," Liz said. "People have expectations about what food looks, tastes, and feels like, and its really important to hit those notes, otherwise you have a cool design that might not look like dessert." Once the designers embraced the inherent qualities of the material, they developed a proprietary 3D-printing process capable of fusing sugar crystals together without deforming or discoloring them. The finished product is as white and sparkling as a sugar cube. Though they missed the birthday by a long shot, the end result spelled their friend's name in a cursive scrawl made entirely from sugar. Sugar Lab, the Von Hasseln's company, has yet to build an entire town out of sugar like the utopian village brought to life by Richard Brautigan in his novel In Watermelon Sugar, but the couple has received hundreds of inquiries from around the world. They are also excited about the role of the designer in the 3D printing revolution. "We think what will move the field forward in the future is not solely additional technological enhancement, but how artists, architects, and designers utilize those capabilities," Liz said. "A 3D printer is a tool and what comes of skilled artisans wielding that tool is what will make the technology resonate with people, and make it culturally relevant."
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MIT Media Lab Enlists 6,500 Silkworms to 3D Print a Dome Pavilion

A new pavilion created by the Mediated Matter research group at MIT’s Media Lab explores the intersection between material technology, computation, and biological and digital fabrication on an architectural scale. Inspired by the silkworm’s ability to create a 3D cocoon out of a single, 1 km thread, a team of researchers led by architect Neri Oxman created a fibrous, CNC-fabricated scaffold made from 26 polygonal panels and laid out in silk thread. They then let loose 6,500 silkworms onto the frame to fill in the gaps and reinforce the structure. The structure’s silk armature was created by an algorithm, based on site-specific solar trajectories and research on the worms’ behavior, which was then built upon by the worms’ on-site reaction to the structure’s geometries and environmental factors, including heat, light, and density. The worms were attracted to darker and denser areas, leaving a large aperture in the pavilion’s southeast side and producing some areas thicker than others. Mediated Matter’s research with the Silk Pavilion opens up new possibilities for the creation of functionally graded material objects (think the varied, porous interior of bone as opposed to the homogeneity of concrete), fibrous systems for the construction of habitable space, and bio-synthetic structures that are capable of interacting with heir environments. Like their (ideal) mechanical counterparts, these small, squishy 3D-printers can self-replicate. While the silkworms were removed from the pavilion before they could transform into moths, once they metamorphose, those 6,500 grubs could produce 1.5 million more, which in turn could construct 250 additional pavilions.
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Featured DesignX Workshop> Skylar Tibbits To Present 4D Printing & Bio-Molecular Self Assembly

designx_4d_01 DesignX presenter Skylar Tibbits, the founder of SJET, Director of Self Assembly Lab, and Senior TED Fellow, will host a hands-on lab introducing interior designers and architects to the future of additive manufacturing and programmable matter. Discover how matter programmers design materials to self-assemble when exposed to the elements. Additional topics include 4D printing and how 3D printing technology is changing. Tibbits will utilize self-assembling structures to touch base on what these changes mean for design practices. The workshop takes place on Tuesday, May 21, 2013 from 12:30 to 1:30 PM and offers 1 AIA CEU. Registration is available online.
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Get AIA CES Credits At Designx/Francis Bitoni Workshop

NYCxDesignJoin us for four days of hands-on digital design and fabrication workshops and at DesignX, hosted by the International Contemporary Furniture Fair, and earn your AIA CES credits! From May 18-21, you can join the industry’s leading experts at the Jacob Javits Center to get your hands dirty with the latest in web-based design apps, parametric design, and interactive modeling services. Stop by Saturday to get the lowdown on 3D printed fabrics from Francis Bitoni, the man behind Dita Von Teese’s miraculously printed gown. Learn how 3D printing is transforming the textile and fashion industries, and get started with the fundamentals of Rhino3D—the world’s leading modeling software. The workshop will cover the basics for creating your design, manipulating geometries, and preparing your textile model for 3D printing. Visit deisgnX.is to reserve your space now, and for more information of the workshops and events.
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3D Printing Helps Visualize Harmony In New Ways

In the 1800s, a French mathematician named Jules Lissajous began using parametric equations, beams of light, mirrors, and vibrating tuning forks to investigate harmonic motion creating what is known as the Lissajous curve. More than a century later at NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program, students Manuela Donoso and Luisa Pereira began using the Lissajous' curve to further explore ways to visually represent musical harmony, using 3D printing technology to produce harmonic sculptures. Last fall, the pair also started using speakers, mirrors, and lasers to create devices and software that make prints and sculptures. They call their project The Harmonic Series. But they aren't the only ones 3D printing music these days. Richard Dahlstrand of Sweden hacked a Lulzbot 3D printer to play and print classical pieces of music. The Harmonic Series works by positioning two speakers with attached mirrors perpendicularly. A laser pointed at one mirror and then reflected by the other lands on a wall. When the speakers begin vibrating based on frequencies of voices, the laser moves, visualizing the frequencies on the wall. The tuning forks used in Lissajous experiment have been replaced with microphones and speakers to allow people to experiment more freely with musical notes and intervals, thus creating more or less chaotic visualizations. Watch the video below for a demonstration. Donoso and Pereira went on to solidify these laser projected sounds by representing them on paper and in 3D printed sculptures. Currently they are preparing a web application so people can experiment and create their own visualizations. The duo is also producing a mobile harmonic device snuggled into a small wooden box that users sing into. Dahlstrand's Lulzbot printer, hacked for Stockholm's Art Hack Day, works with three printing step motors moving at different speeds. The sounds are determined by the speeds of the step motors. There are microphones attached to the motors that pick up and amplify the sounds. This data produces black, wire looking pieces.   3D-printed music from Rickard Dahlstrand on Vimeo.
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Dutch Architects Join Race For World's First 3D-Printed House

Dutch firm DUS Public Architecture has switched gears from soap and water to polypropylene as they join the race (alongside British collective SoftKill Design and fellow Dutchman Janjaap Ruijssenaars) to complete the first 3D printed house. Their sights are set on a full-sized four-story canal house in Amsterdam, entirely printed and built on site by the KamerMaker, their own purpose-built 3D printer housed inside a verticle shipping container. Starting work in the next six months, DUS plan to have the entire facade and first room of the house printed and erected. With the “welcoming room” established, the architects hope to complete the rest of the house in the following three years. DUS plans to use the house as a laboratory for emerging printing technologies and a hub for related research. “We want to build a construction site as an event space,” firm principal Hedwig Heinsman told Dezeen recently, “We’ll have the printer there and every print we make will be exhibited. It’s very much about testing and learning.” Each room of the house is to be devoted to a different facet of research, from turning potato starch into building materials, to recycling plastic bottles and crafting policy. While DUS plans to stay on the site for the next three years, they are ready to move at a moments notice: “We also had the idea that if at one moment we had to relocate it, we would just shred all the pieces and build it anew somewhere,”  Heinsman told Dezeen.
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3D Printing's Newest Champion: Newt Gingrich?!

While President Obama may have called out the economic potential of 3D printing in his State of the Union, one prominent Republican is trumpeting the new technology. In an article posted on the conservative website Human Events, former Speak of the House and presidential candidate Newt Gingrich claims, "the greatest difference in our generation may not be between liberals and conservatives, but between the pioneers of the future and prisoners of the past." Among the technologies he praises, 3D printing is nothing less than "revolutionary." Gingrich has long been a fan of futurist thinking and advanced technology. He campaigned for a colony on the Moon, another place where 3D printing would come in handy:
3D printing may revolutionize logistics and save an amazing amount of money in the Defense Department. It may also revolutionize our capacity to go into space by allowing manufacturing on asteroids and the Moon with minimum weight requirements. 3D printing may also return manufacturing to the United States by eliminating the advantages of low cost mass produced production runs.
 
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TED Fellow Skylar Tibbits Leads April 12 Workshop

Did you miss 3-D printing guru Skylar Tibbits at this year’s TED conference? Never fear, there’s an opportunity to hear Tibbits in New York City on April 12. And not just hear but participate in a hands-on workshop that Tibbits will lead as part of Facades + PERFORMANCE, a two-day conference on high-performance building enclosures sponsored by The Architect’s Newspaper. Earlier this week at TED, Tibbits gave 3-D printing another dimension, quite literally, when he presented the possibility of "4-D printing," or programming materials to self-reassemble into new structures over time. Tibbits unveiled a 4-D printer concept developed with MIT that he argues could have far-reaching implications for not just manufacturing but also for architecture. Will architects one day be able to design structures that build and mend themselves? Here's the idea, as Tibbits told TED: "If we combine the processes that natural systems offer intrinsically—genetic instructions, energy production, error correction—with those artificial or synthetic—programmability for design and scaffold, structure, mechanisms—we can potentially have extremely large-scale quasi-biological and quasi-synthetic architectural organisms." Trained as an architect and a computer scientist,  Tibbits directs MIT's Self-Assembly Lab and teaches in the school's architecture department. He got his start working with the likes of Zaha Hadid and Asymptote Architecture, later founding SJET LLC, a multidisciplinary research based practice. Along the way, Tibbits was named a "Revolutionary Mind" by SEED Magazine in 2008, and in 2011 he was awarded a 2011 TED Fellowship, becoming TED Senior Fellow in 2012. At his April 12 workshop, Tibbits will introduce Python for Rhino, a program that has been a foundation of his work, and cover covered topics ranging from Running Scripts, Syntax, Data Types, and Variables to Flow Control, Tuples/Lists/Dictionaries, Points/Vectors, Functions, Paneling and Recursion. The training portion of the workshop will concentrate on IronPython within Rhino. To register for the workshop and for the April 11-12 conference, where experts in the industry will analyze, discuss, and dispute the development, implementation, and maintenance of facades, click here.