Search results for "wHY"

Placeholder Alt Text

Red Rover Red Rover

Red Regatta brings a sea of color to the Venice lagoon
One of the world’s great liminal conditions is the space between the viewer and the backdrops along the major canals of Venice, Italy. In most spots along the city’s waterfront edge, the view continues across the canals to architectural and historical layers of magnificent facades. It is a contained view of such sublime beauty, that despite the age-old clichés of Venice, it reminds us why we continue to believe in the power of architecture and the city. But, there are wide and expansive vistas out across the open waters of the lagoon that are as equally as captivating. One thinks, for example, of the view from the quarter around the Giardini towards the Lido and San Giorgio Maggiore, or from the Fondamenta Nove towards the Cemetery of San Michele, that opens up to grand vistas that merge the sky and sea; off in the far distance, hints of outer islands add to the beauty of the setting. Now Red Regatta, a series of performances, or “choreographed regattas,” of up to 52 vela al terzo (traditional flat-bottomed sailboats) is being staged in “La Serenissima” by a group of 250 local partners. The event is organized by the Magazzino Italian Art Foundation in New York to highlights the city’s open vistas. Artist Melissa McGill and curator Chiara Spangaro have painted the sails on the boats a bright red color to activate them in the open water of the lagoon. Pageants like Red Regatta are spectacular in the waters of Venice, and this one, its creators believe, staged using only wind-powered sailboats, is intended to “encourage a new appreciation of the interaction of the defining forces of Venice, water, wind art, architecture.” Further, McGill believes that this piece will also “call attention to the forces of climate change, and tourism.” It’s hard to see how this piece will draw prolonged interest in solving these long-suffering issues, but Red Regatta proudly includes Venetians as the performers in the boats, and that’s a great accomplishment for the city in itself. The dates of the special regatta, organized alongside the city’s ongoing art biennale, are as follow: Red Regatta  June 30, 2019, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Route: San Servolo – Poveglia Viewing locations: Riva dei Sette Martiri; Viale Giardini Pubblici; San Servolo Island; Lido’s Lagoon waterfront From McGill: “Navigating the waters between the islands of San Servolo and Poveglia, Red Regatta will weave through the historic landscape and activate the architecture with the choreographed flotilla. Starting between San Servolo and Venice, Red Regatta will move towards Poveglia, in parallel to the Lagoon coast of Lido.” Red Regatta, coinciding with Venice’s Regata Storica September 1, 2019, 12:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m. Route: Canale della Giudecca – Bacino San Marco – Canal Grande Viewing locations: Fondamenta Zattere; Punta della Dogana; Isola di San Giorgio Maggiore; Piazza San Marco and Riva degli Schiavoni; Fondamenta della Giudecca, side of Canale della Giudecca Canal Grande Red Regatta  September 15, 2019, 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Route: Burano – Torcello Viewing locations: Burano waterfront; Torcello waterfront From McGill: “Concurrently with the historic Regata di Burano, which features the centuries-old tradition of the voga alla veneta, Red Regatta will move through the Northern lagoon between Burano and Torcello. Engaging with the landscape of this unique section of Venice with its ancient Roman ruins and distinctive architecture, the vela al terzo fleet will weave through the islands and call attention to the location’s history and traditions.”
Placeholder Alt Text

Gaming Design

Graphisoft CEO talks about changes in BIM possibilities with ARCHICAD

At the 2019 AIA Architecture Expo in Las Vegas earlier this month, longtime architectural software company Graphisoft premiered the newest update to their ARCHICAD software suite, a 3D BIM tool which has been available to architects continually since 1984.

ARCHICAD 23, according to recently-appointed CEO Huw Roberts, a former architect, adds an array of new features and "a whole bunch of really substantial performance increasing capabilities." This includes whole new ways of dealing with mechanical voids, columns, and beams, among other building fundamentals, and a live connection that automatically makes changes within existing software like Rhino and Grasshopper.

Additionally, the new release has more APIs and greater OPEN BIM integration. “We're strong advocates of OPEN BIM," said Roberts, "and connecting our users with all the different tools and products out there through our open BIM." In addition to existing C++ integration, ARCHICAD 23 also adds support for Python and JSON. There is also an API for Graphisoft’s mobile app. “We've got lots of customers that are using programmatic interface through Rhino and Grasshopper, but that requires you to actually be in the software,” said Roberts going over the benefits of the new APIs, "But that API actually can work software to software, doesn't need a human or user interface to make that connection.”

Graphisoft also entered into an agreement with Epic Games to leverage Unreal Engine, the video game engine behind Fortnite and other massively popular mainstream video games. “[Unreal Engine] allows you to add things like trees, and lights, and weather, and cars, and more, in a really easy way,” said Roberts. “Twinmotion is an extension built on Unreal Engine that Epic Games just bought a month ago that we have already had a partnership with, that makes Unreal Engine work really well for AEC, for architects, and designers. And so what an ARCHICAD user can do is we have a live link from ARCHICAD to Twinmotion and the Epic Games Unreal Engine, so that in real time you can be changing your BIM model and a photorealistic movie view of the model updates live,” he explained. “You can fly around in there, and move around, and change the weather, change materials, and it's always instantly the best rendering available.”

Placeholder Alt Text

The Bigger Picture

Mapping Community unveils how public buildings get built in NYC
A new exhibition now on view at the Center for Architecture explains how money moves across New York’s public building sector. It’s a complex system that, if you’re not directly involved in it, can seem unnecessarily confusing and slow. Mapping Community: Public Investment in NYC demystifies how things like libraries, schools, and parks pop up, as well as the players behind them. Curated by Faith Rose, former executive director of the NYC Public Design Commission, and David Burney, professor of urban placemaking management at the Pratt Institute, the showcase walks viewers step-by-step through the process of capital planning. It’s spread out over two floors and utilizes a very clear and graphic layout so that the information is distilled to the audience in a digestible yet still visually distinctive manner.  “No one entity is responsible for the entire process, and even people deeply involved in one part aren’t always aware what the other pieces entail,” said Rose in a statement. “I don’t believe there has ever been an exhibition that tracks the mechanisms of capital planning from start to finish.”  There probably hasn’t.  That’s likely because New York City boasts one of the largest local government systems in the United States and its beast-of-a-procurement-process is less than transparent. But things are changing and this big-picture view of the “ecosystem of agencies” involved reveals the work it takes to make tangible improvements to the city. This knowledge, for better or for worse, arguably gives a viewer (or in this case, a local resident), the agency to insert themselves into the planning process and help shape their own neighborhood.  To communicate the complexity of the subject, the curators pieced together an in-depth look into one public project per borough, separated by typology, and detailed the planning process at the community level. One of those case studies centers on Essex Crossing, the massive, mixed-use development on Manhattan’s Lower East Side. A contentious construction project from the start, it was once an empty six-acre lot but now houses everything from luxury condos by SHoP Architects, to an affordable housing complex by Beyer Blinder Belle, a senior living community by Dattner Architects, and the newly-opened Essex Market.  This part of the exhibition tells the story of how Manhattan Community Board 3 and other local organizations fought over a series of negotiations with the NYC Economic Development Corporation, as well as the site’s developer, to get a new K-8 school in the program. Here, it explains why the Department of Education has currently decided not to move forward with building a new school. It also reveals how local needs in other areas can affect capital projects.  Whether it was the right thing to do or not, garnering this information allows locals and exhibition audiences to better understand how the 1.9-million-square-foot Essex Crossing has come to be, what its future may look like, and how they can have a say in that. According to Hayes Slade, 2019 AIANY President and principal of Slade Architecture, that’s the key to improving the city. “New Yorkers should feel empowered to be part of community-building,” she said, “and that is only possible if they are knowledgeable of the process.” Mapping Community will be on view through August 31. 
Placeholder Alt Text

Blocked Out

Toronto drops concrete blocks in front of illegal home weed stores
A peculiar legal loophole in Ontario, Canada's weed laws prevents authorities from accessing and shutting down alleged illegal cannabis dispensaries that operate out of people's homes. Predictably, the state is not happy about it. That's why Toronto law enforcement has dropped large concrete blocks in front of the storefronts in question. Big blocks = no buyers going in and no product going out. Reddit user okThisYear snapped a picture of one of the piles, which resemble a drunk giant Lego pile-on:
In front of an old dispensary. from r/toronto
This cement chock-a-block has to be one of the more ham-handed architectures of exclusion. But it wasn't a first-try tactic: Previously, authorities had padlocked entrances and installed steel doors to prevent illegal sales, but the strategy didn't deter around 15 percent of the city's craftiest underground dealers, who continued to peddle cannabis from their stores-slash-homes. As of this year, weed is legal in Toronto, but the drug can only be sold by licensed dispensaries. CBC reported that a bill to close the loophole received royal assent (it passed) over the objections of some legislators who fear the law might lead to evictions if residents who are not participating in the weed business are found guilty of unlawful sales by association.
Placeholder Alt Text

Let's Beaux

CMG to bring back 1912 feel for San Francisco Civic Center overhaul
After over a year of community review, a refined vision plan by CMG Landscape Architecture designed to upgrade and modernize San Francisco’s Civic Center district is moving forward. Backed by a supergroup design team that includes Kennerly Architecture + Planning, Gehl Studio, HR&A, and others, CMG’s proposal seeks to retool the multi-block plaza and pedestrian mall to better fulfill the original 1912 Beaux Arts plan proposed for the site by architect John Galen Howard, designer of the University of California, Berkeley. CMG’s vision is part of a larger effort spearheaded by the City of San Francisco called the Civic Center Public Realm Plan, a scheme that seeks to articulate a “unified vision for long-term improvements to the area’s public spaces and streets.” As it stands, the Civic Center area is anchored by three major public spaces that are each being reworked by the latest plan to promote universal accessibility, access to nature, and around-the-clock public use. CMG proposes to transform the namesake Civic Center Plaza flanking City Hall into a series of outdoor “garden rooms” that surround a central square. The four garden rooms will contain a pair of lawns and newly planted tree areas that celebrate and frame a pair of recently refurbished playgrounds. The space will be anchored by an interactive play fountain that can be turned off during the protests and gatherings that take over the space. On the opposite end of the axis that runs through the district, the United Nations Plaza will see significant changes, including the “adaptation” of an arresting but unloved Lawrence Halprin–designed monumental fountain. The connecting block along Fulton Street that links the two plaza areas will be upgraded as well, with new soccer fields installed in the space between the Asian Art Museum—where wHY is currently planning an ambitious expansion—and the San Francisco Public Library buildings. Willett Moss, founding partner at CMG, said, “Initially we thought the plan would be responsive to the district’s diverse demographics with a multitude of culturally specific amenities and experiences. However, through the process, we realized that the vast majority of people want essentially the same thing—a space that’s inclusive, accessible, and celebratory.” A final version of the community-led design will be unveiled later this year with final completion of the project expected by 2022.
Placeholder Alt Text

Curatorial Platform

Architect creates app to change how exhibitions are designed
For all the advances in technology over the past decade, the experience of curating and viewing museum shows has remained relatively unchanged. Even though digital archive systems exist and have certainly helped bring old institutions into the present, they have relatively little influence over the ways museum shows are designed and shared. The normal practice is more or less “old school” and even borderline “dysfunctional,” said Bika Rebek, principal of the New York and Vienna–based firm Some Place Studio. In fact, a survey she conducted early on found that many of the different software suites that museum professionals were using were major time sinks for their jobs. Fifty percent said they felt they were “wasting time” trying to fill in data or prepare presentations for design teams. To Rebek, this is very much an architectural problem, or at least a problem architects can solve. She has been working over the past two years, supported by NEW INC and the Knight Foundation, to develop Tools for Show, an interactive web-based application for designing and exploring exhibitions at various scales—from the level of a vitrine to a multi-floor museum. Leveraging her experiences as an architect, 3D graphics expert, and exhibition designer (she’s worked on major shows for the Met and Met Breuer, including the OMA-led design for the 2016 Costume Institute exhibition Manus x Machina), Rebek began developing a web-based application to enable exhibition designers and curators to collaborate, and to empower new ways of engaging with cultural material for users anywhere. Currently, institutions use many different gallery tools, she explained, which don’t necessarily interact and don’t usually let curators think spatially in a straightforward way. Tools for Show allows users to import all sorts of information and metadata from existing collection management software (or enter it anew), which is attached to artworks stored in a library that can then be dragged and dropped into a 3D environment at scale. Paintings and simple 3D shapes are automatically generated, though, for more complex forms where the image projected onto a form of a similar footprint isn’t enough, users could create their own models.  For example, to produce the New Museum’s 2017 show Trigger: Gender as a Tool and a Weapon, Rebek rendered the space and included many of the basic furnishings unique to the museum. For other projects, like a test case with the Louvre's sculptures, she found free-to-use models and 3D scans online. Users can drag these objects across the 3D environments and access in-depth information about them with just a click. With quick visual results and Google Docs-style automatic updates for collaboration, Tools for Show could help not just replace more cumbersome content management systems, but endless emails too. Rebek sees Tools for Show as having many potential uses. It can be used to produce shows, allowing curators to collaboratively and easily design and re-design their exhibitions, and, after the show comes down it can serve as an archive. It can also be its own presentation system—not only allowing “visitors” from across the globe to see shows they might otherwise be unable to see, but also creating new interactive exhibitions or even just vitrines, something she’s been testing out with Miami’s Vizcaya Museum and Gardens. More than just making work easier for curators and designers, Tools for Show could possibly give a degree of curatorial power and play over to a broader audience. “[Tools for Show] could give all people the ability to curate their own show without any technical knowledge,” she explained. And, after all, you can't move around archival materials IRL, so why not on an iPad? While some of the curator-focused features of Tools for Show are in the testing phase, institutions can already request the new display tools like those shown at Vizcaya. Rebek, as a faculty member at Columbia University's Graduate School of Architecture, Planning, and Preservation, has also worked with students to use Tools for Show in conjunction with photogrammetry techniques in an effort to develop new display methods for otherwise inaccessible parts of the Intrepid Sea, Air, and Space Museum, a history and naval and aerospace museum located in a decommissioned aircraft carrier floating in the Hudson River. At a recent critique, museum curators were invited to see the students’ new proposals and explore the spatial visualizations of the museum through interactive 3D models, AR, VR, as well as in-browser and mobile tools that included all sorts of additional media and information.
Placeholder Alt Text

And More

Weekend edition: Björk, World War I, vintage hand drawings
Missed some of this week’s architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Björk enlists Arup engineers to design musical chamber for her latest tour Björk, the Icelandic pop icon, enlisted Arup acoustical engineers to design a portable singing chamber for her Cornucopia tour. New York gallery displays hand-drafted architecture drawings Victoria Munroe Fine Art in New York's Upper East Side is displaying hand-drawn architecture drawings from the past 300 years. National WWI Memorial moves ahead with controversial Pershing Park plan The U.S. Commission of Fine Arts has approved the massive relief sculpture at the heart of the potential National WWI Memorial in Washington, D.C. Why Arata Isozaki deserves the Pritzker Our executive editor, Matt Shaw, argues in support of Arata Isozaki's Pritzker Prize win and the architect's unique path through postmodernism and more.
Placeholder Alt Text

High Carb Art

Urs Fischer shows a house made of bread in Connecticut gallery
The unusual, full-scale alpine cabin at the Brant Foundation Art Study Center in Greenwich, Connecticut, reveals itself as you walk close to it. Created by New York–based Swiss artist Urs Fischer, Untitled (Bread House), (2004-2005), is actually made of loaves from Sullivan Street Bakery, expandable foam, and wood. Rugs line the floor along with fallen breadcrumbs. It’s the contradictory use of a soft, perishable, edible material for a solidly-constructed, traditional shelter that is arresting, charming, and unexpected. Fischer’s solo exhibition is titled ERROR, and marks the 10th anniversary of the gallery space designed by Richard Gluckman (formerly of Gluckman Mayner, currently Gluckman Tang) who transformed a 1902 stone barn, originally a cold storage facility for local orchards (Gluckman also designed the new Brant Foundation Art Study Center in New York). Architecture has become a bigger consideration in Fischer’s artwork, which is composed of sculpture, installation, and graphics, and their spatial relationships to the environment. Other works in the show incorporate furniture into his bemused, cockeyed universe: Kratz and Untitled, (Soft Bed) (both 2013) feature beds buckling under weight, while Horse/Bed (2013) grafts a workhorse to a hospital bed; The Lock (2007) and You Can Not Win (2003) surreally play with chairs. Filling the double-height gallery, “why do you hate me? i never helped you” (2018) comprises 3,150 small plaster projectile “raindrops” suspended on nylon filaments that shower throughout the space. The title was cited by Leonard Cohen as a favorite expression, and is supposedly a Chinese or Jewish proverb.
Placeholder Alt Text

Mix Master

Brooklyn's Katie Stout turns trash into high design
Artist and designer Katie Stout is building a triumphal arch—of trash. The aptly-titled Arc de Trash is the biggest thing she’s ever made, and it’s covered with material samples, shells, a DVD of Baz Lurhmann’s Romeo + Juliet, plastic necklaces, a friend’s shoe. “I don’t know why, but I love this gross cardboard situation,” Stout said, pointing to a mysterious mass of packaging tape, brown paper, and plaster near the lintel. There’s even a section devoted to an array of tiny plastic E.T.s from Wolf E. Myrow, a store in Providence, near the Rhode Island School of Design from which Stout graduated in 2012. “It’s a bunch of crap,” Stout said. “But every time I go in there I just think I need this box of E.T.s.” Positioned in front of the arch is a half-completed ceramic sphinx, which will provide a “regal moment amongst the trash and the rubble.” Originally, Stout wanted people to get on the beast and ride it. Read the full story on our new interiors site aninteriormag.com.
Placeholder Alt Text

Lyrical Design

Lyric, the rental conversion startup, talks value of design
Reconfiguring residential units into hospitality spaces isn’t exactly what home sharing service Airbnb is known for, but it certainly aligns with their mission. That might explain why the company was the lead investor in a funding round last month that netted $160 million for the startup Lyric. Lyric, founded in 2014, operates in 13 cities across the U.S. After leasing units in apartment buildings, the company renovates and restyles them for travelers with a suite of amenities. Lyric finely balances between styling its units as hospitality-minded spaces and livable apartments; it recognizes that while some travelers may use their rentals as “crash pads,” others might stay for a longer term and want to explore the culture of their host city. AN Interior recently sat down with Nicole Bernstein, senior director of experience design, and Ravi Hampole, vice president of brand and design, to discuss the challenges, advantages, and design inspiration that drive Lyric. Check out the full story on our new interiors site, aninteriormag.com.
Placeholder Alt Text

From Notre Dame to Now

Why are architects focusing on Notre Dame and not St. Landry Parish?
One month ago, all of Paris and people around the world watched as flames rose high into the air above France's beloved Notre Dame Cathedral. The sight was tragic and left many asking how, why, and what next. The response was immediate and immense. Less than 48 hours after the Notre Dame fire, Prime Minister Édouard Philippe announced an international design competition to reimagine the iconic arrow-like spire atop the cathedral. In one week, over $1 billion was pledged to restore the cultural icon, with a promise by the president of France himself to rebuild the global landmark in under five years. Within days of that statement, design firms responded eagerly for their chance to impart their ideas on this historic building. For designers, this competition could be viewed as the chance of a lifetime, the opportunity to make a mark on an icon of culture and history. But Notre Dame was far from the only house of worship to suffer catastrophic damage this year. Three historically black churches in Louisiana burned in a series of alleged hate crimes, three churches in Sri Lanka were bombed on Easter Sunday, and a mosque in Christchurch, New Zealand, was riddled with bullet holes, all just in the past few months. All of these events are tragic too. Why is the design world addressing only one? When the three churches of St. Landry Parish in southern Louisiana burned to the ground in the two weeks between March 26 and April 4, these fires quickly made the national news and became a springboard for conversations around race relations in our country. On a national scale, these discussions were, quite necessarily, about the hateful acts themselves, but failed to address what to do in their aftermath. It wasn’t until the massive financial response to the Notre Dame fire took off that a larger spotlight illuminated the plight of these churches as spaces and places in need of financial support as well. People around the world began donating funds to the Seventh District Baptist Church’s GoFundMe page, which before the Notre Dame fire had only raised $50,000. In the two days following April 15, the day of the Notre Dame fire, the campaign brought in nearly $1 million. This display of generosity was not in multi-million dollar donations but in amounts ranging mostly from $5 to $20. One month later, the church has nearly $2.2 million to rebuild. Despite the money now available, there has been no political charge and few design ideas put forward for the rebuilding of the three Louisiana churches. Does St. Landry Parish not warrant as bold a vision for its rebuilding efforts as Notre Dame? One might say the Louisiana buildings were not on the same playing field as Notre Dame. And it’s true that they didn’t have the same grandeur of scale or the global affinity, but they had people who depended on them all the same. We need to stop idolizing the building as an icon, and instead, honor the people of a place. This is also an opportunity to start bridging the expansive gap of access and inclusion that exists in today’s design community—the glaring lack of diversity within the makeup of our industry and its projects. It is a chance to refocus the lens of design beyond massive, global, and wealthy institutions to include those that capture the essence of all people and all experiences. Design is a tool to bring people together and help foster conversations that can lead to healing. For communities in Louisiana, Christchurch, and Sri Lanka, communities that have had some of their most sacred places ravaged by the violence of hate, a new place can help people mourn what and whom they’ve lost, celebrate those lives, and then, in time, focus on their shared beliefs and common goals. A new place can help people to rise above the negativity of a few and honor the positivity of the whole. We should always remember that design is for everyone, not just those where “funding is not an issue.” So let’s open our ears, our minds, and our hearts to the communities who need their voices heard and let’s expand on the definition of design so that it is no longer rooted in the things that we build but instead is measured by the experiences we shape and the memories we create. Meredith McCarthy, AIA, is a senior associate with Sasaki. She is passionate about advancing equity and inclusion within the industry and through her design work with communities around the world.  
Placeholder Alt Text

Welcome to New York

Architect and designer Piero Lissoni talks Italian design
Piero Lissoni, the Italian architect, furniture, and product designer, was in town this week for ICFF and AN had a chance to sit down with him in his SoHo office to discuss his career, why Italian product design leads the world, and why Phi-3.14 is still key to all design. Lissoni has worked for nearly every important Italian and international design brand but emphasizes that he is first an architect and secondarily a product designer. When I asked him about his (and Italy’s) success as a world leader in design, without hesitation he pointed to the educational system in Italy. Lissoni studied architecture at the Polytechnic University of Milan, which, he emphasizes, is not like so many Anglo-Saxon universities “a scientific” or technical university but a “humanistic” one that also teaches drawing, art, geography, history, and the importance of 3.14, the “Greek magic number.” He believes Phi and classical proportion is the “key” to good design and points to Hudson Yards as a “totally inhuman” alien environment because of its disconnection from scale and proportion. As a current faculty member at the Polytechnic, Lissoni still teaches hand drawing, physical model building, and not “just information,” but “the culture behind the profession.” When Lissoni graduated from the Polytechnic, he worked for several years in architecture firms in Milan, Paris, Amsterdam, and Tokyo, but when he was “still very young” Boffi, the Italian kitchen manufacturer, picked him to be the firm’s “art director.” This role meant he was a “working intellectual” inside the office working across divisions to help design-direct all communications, advertising, catalogues, and trade show booths. This position at Boffi gave him a great education into the business of design and in 1986, together with Nicoletta Canesi, he founded the interdisciplinary studio Lissoni Associati in Milan. The firm opened a New York office in 2015, and Lissoni, looking for an inspirational break, will spend next fall in New York. From his SoHo office he will direct the architecture, product design, and graphic identities that the firm is working on in nearly every continent. It is one of the most successful design firms in the world, and it will be great to have the maestro in New York.