Search results for "bohlin cywinski jackson"

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Bohlin in Baltimore
The Waterfront at Canton Crossing, by Elkus Manfredi Architects.
Courtesy Corporate Office Properties Trust

For years, a massive car repair shop sat dormant and awaiting redevelopment near the south Baltimore waterfront, part of a “proposed $110 million aquatic life center that never materialized. But now the building is finally getting recycled for a different use—a 21st century “maker space” where activities will range from 3D printing and shoe design to glass blowing and blacksmithing.

The garage conversion is one of several projects underway by Sagamore Development, the real estate arm of Kevin Plank, CEO of the Baltimore-based sportswear giant Under Armour. Sagamore and its affiliates have acquired 230 acres in South Baltimore to build a new headquarters for Under Armour.

The team wants to create an urban waterfront campus that will mix office and manufacturing spaces with housing, recreational areas, commercial space, and even a whiskey distillery called Sagamore Spirit. Bohlin Cywinski Jackson of Philadelphia is the master planner for the multi-phase project, which is expected to cost well over $1 billion.

But Under Armour is not the only company in town raising eyebrows with a billion-dollar development project. Cranes are filling the Baltimore sky like never before.

 

Around the city, there are no fewer than six projects by single-developer teams that are each expected to represent investments of more than $1 billion. (A seventh is just outside the city limits on the former Bethlehem Steel Corp. steel mill site at Sparrows Point.)

All of these were in the works before the civil unrest in late April following the death of West Baltimore resident Freddie Gray, who died after suffering injuries while in police custody. At least one of these projects has actually grown in scope since the spring.

“While some might expect that the recent unrest had a chilling effect on development, Baltimore has experienced the exact opposite—developers are working with a sense of urgency and resolve to ‘build it now,’” said William H. Cole, president and CEO of the Baltimore Development Corp., a quasi-public agency that oversees development citywide. “That type of resolve is encouraging and hopefully will lead to a more successful future for all residents in Baltimore City.”

Developers say their projects are moving ahead because most were so far along in the pipeline—with funding sources in place—that the riots didn’t stop them. They also note that the mega-developments are mostly in East or South Baltimore, miles away from the epicenter of the civil unrest, a poor section of West Baltimore known as Sandtown.

Three of the billion-dollar projects represent the continued march of development eastward from Baltimore’s Inner Harbor renewal area, where redevelopment began in the 1960s.

The Exelon Tower site is part of Harbor Point, one of a host of billion-dollar projects underway in Baltimore.
Courtesy BHC Architects
 

They include:

Harbor East: This mini-city of hotels, condominiums, offices, and shops is located just east of the Inner Harbor. Stan Eckstut, then with Ehrenkrantz, Eckstut & Kuhn of New York, along with Cho Benn Holback + Associates of Baltimore, provided the original master plan. The developer is Baltimore baker John Paterakis’ H&S Properties.  One of the latest projects is an addition to the Four Seasons Hotel that will contain condominium residences. Beatty Harvey Coco is the architect.
Harbor Point: A mixed-use community sits on the site of the former AlliedSignal chromium plant, a Superfund property that has been cleaned up and capped for redevelopment. Ayers Saint Gross provided the master plan for Beatty Development.
The Waterfront at Canton Crossing: This mixed-use community will be on a former industrial site farther east in Canton that includes more than two million square feet of office and retail space, a residential tower up to 40 stories high, a 200 slip marina, recreational open space, and 7000 parking spaces. Elkus Manfredi Architects of Boston is the master planner for Corporate Office Properties Trust of Columbia, Maryland. Architect David Manfredi says the eastward march of development along Baltimore’s waterfront—which is turning Baltimore from a compact urban center into a linear city—is “kind of manifest destiny.”
Health care and medical research are also driving three other billion-dollar projects.

Johns Hopkins Hospital Expansion: Completed in 2012 for $1.1 billion, Johns Hopkins Medicine expanded its existing hospital to included a 12-story adult care tower and a 12-story children’s tower, both designed by Perkins + Will, following a master plan by Cooper, Robertson & Partners. Hopkins is now renovating nearly a dozen buildings that were fully or partially vacated when their occupants moved to the new towers, in a $250 million, 300,000-square-foot “back-fill” project that is one of the largest adaptive reuse projects in the country.

Science + Technology Park at Johns Hopkins: North of Hopkins’ medical campus, Forest City Enterprises and the New East Baltimore Partnership are building this 31-acre community with research labs, offices, a hotel, and commercial space around a central park. Sasaki Associates prepared the master plan.

University of Maryland BioPark: Another fast growing hub of research labs and medical facilities on the west side of downtown.

Sparrows Point redevelopment: The biggest project in terms of acreage, James C. Davis and Redwood Capital Investments are transforming the former Sparrows Point property, which, in its heyday during the 1950s and 1960s, was the largest steel mill in the world. With roughly 3,000 acres, it is expected to become one of the largest commercial developments on the East Coast.

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Gold-Plated Bohlin
Apple Store Fifth Avenue, New York (2006).
COURTESY bcj
 
 

Peter Bohlin was selected today as this year’s winner of the American Institute of Architects’ (AIA) Gold Medal, the highest honor attainable by an individual architect. Bohlin is a founding principal of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, which has received over 400 design awards in its forty-four year history, including the AIA Firm Award in 1994.

“I’m so pleased and I’m surprised,” Bohlin said in a statement. “We all believe in architecture,” he added. “Like athletes, we all know that it’s hard work to make it look easy, and we’re all constantly striving to do that.”

Overseeing a 200-person firm with offices in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania; Pittsburgh; Philadelphia; Seattle; and San Francisco, Bohlin has championed a nuanced approach to contextuality. In New York City, the firm's most iconic building is arguably the subterranean Apple store on Fifth Avenue, whose entrance is marked by a pristine, 32-foot structural glass cube that houses a transparent glass elevator and circular stair leading down to the store below. On the West Coast, he is also known for Seattle’s LEED-Gold certified city hall, a 200,000-square-foot building with a planted roof and gently curving curtain walls of steel and glass, built jointly in 2005 with Bassetti Architects.


Seattle City Hall (2003).
Nic Lehoux

These urban icons notwithstanding, Bohlin has done some of his most characteristic work in natural settings, earning plaudits for his environmental sensitivity and contextual materials. His portfolio includes numerous private residences, including a partially earth-integrated, 66,000-square-foot home for the Gates family in Medina, Washington, built with Douglas fir and surrounded by a recreated wetland.

In New York, a chain of low-lying buildings stretches along the edge of one of the Finger Lakes to form the award-winning Combs Point Residence. Bohlin’s rural institutional work has a similarly light touch: the Pocono Environmental Education Center in Dingmans Ferry, Pennsylvania, is a simple shed topped with an overhang roof and outfitted with a host of green features, such as south-facing windows and shingles cut from locally scavenged tires.


Combs Point Residence, Finger Lakes, New York.
Nic Lehoux

Along with the Gold Medal, the AIA also awarded top honors in two other categories today. The 35-year-old Pugh + Scarpa Architects garnered the 2010 AIA Firm Award, the highest award bestowed on an architecture firm, with the AIA praising its “seamless blending of architecture, art, and craft” and its “nurturing of in-house talent.” The Firm Award comes on the heels of Pugh + Scarpa winning the 2010 AIA California Council Firm of the Year Award in October. Finally, the AIA Topaz Medallion for Excellence in Architectural Education went to Michael Graves, who has taught architectural design and theory for more than 40 years and is now a professor emeritus at Princeton University.

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Philly’s Commercial Corner
Courtesy Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

15th and Walnut
Architect: Bohlin Cywinski Jackson
Client: Midwood Development
Location: Philadelphia
Completion: 2014

The architectural firm behind Apple’s famous crystalline cube on Fifth Avenue has designed a dynamic glass retail structure in downtown Philadelphia at the intersection of 15th and Walnut streets. After studying various massing configurations that would allow tenants to customize their own identity without compromising the overall building appearance, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (BCJ) devised a three-story structure with enough visual weight to hold its own among the masonry architecture of Center City.

“We evolved into a horizontal layering effect on the facade to give the appearance that the walls could slide,” said Andrew Moroz, associate at BCJ. Since solar heat gain is not an issue on the well-shaded, north-facing site, the architects were able to use ultra-clear low-iron glass. The material allows the steel structure to show through. Though it’s only three stories, with twenty-foot floor-to-floor heights the building reaches 65 feet tall. The structurally-glazed horizontal layers help to emphasize the building’s corner, where a second-story open terrace will be built for the unlikely anchor tenant of this sleek modern building: The Cheesecake Factory.

 

Philadelphia’s new stormwater regulations stipulate that the structure must retain 20 percent of the rainwater that hits its roof. The architects employed a mix of green and blue roof technologies that could later be partially occupied, depending on tenant fit-outs. Moroz said site demolition will begin this spring followed by a 14-month construction period.

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Store
Ryan Cosens

Lincoln Park Apple Store
1801 West North Avenue
Chicago, Illinois
Tel: 312-777-4200
Designer: Bohlin Cywinski Jackson with Hoerr Schaudt

Taking a cue from its earlier venture, Apple has opened its second store within Chicago city limits on what is perhaps the Michigan Avenue for locals: the North Avenue shopping corridor in Lincoln Park. Apple takes center stage with its architecturally ambitious new building on the triangular site of the North/Clybourn Red Line L station, which they also invested millions in renovating. A new outdoor plaza, the site’s strongest design element, divides the station from the store. Designed by Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects, the plaza is bordered by three raised planters, and Bertoia side chairs and small round cafe tables surround a fountain sitting at grade. The cumulative effect feels worthy of a museum sculpture garden.


Straightforward glass and brushed metal panels are in keeping with the minimal Apple message.

The building itself, clad in brushed metal panels, sits on a north/south orientation, with glass walls and entrances at each end and a third facing west into the shared plaza with the El. If customers tear their eyes away from the products and look up into the soaring room, they’ll find a massive skylight running the length of the building that fills the space with natural light. What they won’t see is the green roof that caps the sleek structure.


The outdoor plaza includes Bertoia side chairs and an at-grade fountain.
 
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Terrier Tower

Boston University turns a page with a statement-making tower
A new architectural era is dawning at Boston University (BU) with the announcement of the building of the Data Sciences Center on the university’s main Charles River campus. First, it is a bit of design daring not commonly seen in Boston: a ziggurat-shaped tower with multiple cantilevers that will be the tallest building on campus. But moreover, it represents a break from the past for an institution that eschewed contemporary architectural patronage for more than two generations. “It’s like a spark plug that jumps out at you,” said Bruce Kuwabara, a partner in KPMB Architects of Toronto, designers of the building. “BU wanted to make a statement.” Gary Nicksa, BU’s senior vice president for operations, concurred, adding: “The city has embraced the idea of more remarkable architecture at BU.” A little background is in order. John Silber, president of the university from 1971 to 1996 and from 2002 to 2003, was an academic curmudgeon whose conservative politics were matched by his disdain for cutting-edge architecture. He even wrote a manifesto of sorts, a book titled Architecture of the Absurd, in which he excoriated his fellow college presidents for commissioning the likes of Frank Gehry and Steven Holl to design eye-catching buildings, singling out Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Stata Center by Gehry, Simmons Hall by Holl) for special scorn. But that was then, this is now. For this new landmark, BU invited a number of top architects to submit quals and then narrowed the field down to five: KPMB, Safdie Architects, Kohn Pedersen Fox, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson, and Elkus Manfredi Architects. BU officials visited works by many of the architects, taking a field trip to Toronto to view KPMB’s. Kuwabara described the KPMB scheme as a “vertical campus” that celebrates the importance of data science by bringing together the mathematics and statistics departments and the computer science department under one roof. The architect said the building’s spaces “spiral” around an interior atrium that is all about spontaneous encounters with colleagues and students that are essential in the data sciences field. “You need a building that encourages collisions,” Kuwabara said. The cantilevered and stepped massing yields several advantages. It forms balconies and green roofs that allow occupants fresh air and stunning views of the Boston skyline and Charles River. It will cause a play of light and shadow. And, significantly, it will appear to be a beehive at night, with loft-like interior spaces highly conducive to work and creativity 24/7. The choice of some materials is still a work in process. At present, the rust-colored cladding is specified as terracotta panels, but that could change, Kuwabara said. But whether terra cotta or metal, he says, it will be aesthetically compatible with the ubiquitous red brick found throughout Boston. Without specifically stating it, it is clear that BU wants a new architectural profile commensurate with those of Harvard University and MIT. “This will get noticed across the river,” Kuwabara said.
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Inside Jobs

Here are the winners of the AIA Honor Awards 2018 in interior architecture
[Editor’s Note: This the second in a three-part series documenting the winners of the AIA 2018 Honor Awards, which are broken down into three categories: architecture, interior architecture, and urban design. This list covers the interior architecture awards, but additional segments spotlight winners in architecture and urban design.] The American Institute of Architects announced its 2018 recipients of the Institute Honor Awards January 12. The 17 winners were pulled from approximately 500 submissions from across the globe and five interior architecture projects took home the prize. The designs range from a high-end New York loft to a middle school in Missouri, with unique approaches to lighting, spatial volume, and material palette. The five-person jury that selected this year’s AIA Interior Architecture Honor Award winners included:
  • Brian Caldwell, THINKTANK Design Group;
  • Joshua Aidlin, Aidlin Darling Design;
  • Kiyomi Kurooka, DWL Architects + Planners Inc.;
  • John Paquin, Statesville;
  • William T. Ruhl, RUHL WALKER Architects.
Chicago Public Library, Chinatown Branch Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Chicago From the jury: “The conscious approach for the building’s ideals for interior decisions are evident in the artistic expression of the history of the cultural identity of the community." Photographer's Loft Desai Chia Architecture New York City From the jury: "This is exquisitely detailed and crafted so much so that it appears one would be living in artwork." Reeds Spring Middle School Dake Wells Architecture Reeds Spring, Missouri From the jury: "Such a clear concept organized the program around elements found in the Ozark landscape led to beautiful execution. Buried in a hill, yet bursting full of daylight is praiseworthy.” Sound Transit University of Washington Station LMN Architects Seattle From the jury: "An aesthetically inspiring jewel that doubles as fantastic public art." Square, Inc. Headquarters Bohlin Cywinski Jackson San Francisco From the jury: "The company’s ethos is reflected in every detail of their software and hardware products, with a crisp, minimalist design that is both intuitive and elegant."
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What an Honor

Here are the winners of the 2018 AIA Honor Awards in architecture
This is the first article in a three part series documenting the 2018 AIA Institute Honor Awards. This lists the winners of the architecture category, while additional segments contain the winners in the interior architecture and regional & urban design categories. The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced the 2018 winners of the AIA Institute Honor Awards. The list contains projects from all around the world, and of varying programs and uses, and honors firms both large and small. From a girls’ school in Afghanistan to a municipal salt shed, this year’s widely diverse group of winning projects will be recognized at the AIA Conference on Architecture 2018 in New York City, in late June. This year's eight member jury panel included:
  • Lee Becker, FAIA (Chair), Hartman-Cox Architects
  • Anne Marie Decker, FAIA, Duvall Decker Architects
  • Susan Johnson, AIA, Strata; Anna Jones, Assoc. AIA, MOD Design
  • Caitlin Kessler, AIAS Student Representative, University of Arizona
  • Merilee Meacock, AIA, KSS Architects
  • Robert Miller, FAIA, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson
  • Sharon Prince, Grace Farms Foundation
  • Rob Rogers, FAIA, Rogers Partners.
  Project: Audain Art Museum Architect: Patkau Architects Inc. Location: Whistler, British Columbia, Canada From the AIA Jury: A beautiful, dynamic project that literally wraps users around nature, blurring the boundaries between man-made and natural. It creates a cultural magnet to help educate not only art, but eco-friendly design. The elegant structure hovers over a floodplain topography in an area that receives a large amount of snowfall, battling the elements through an architectural form that embraces the setting. Opportunity for people to live with art. The typology of the building is a stepping stone for Canada, a new icon, and a monument for British Columbia. It has helped elevate all of us. Project: The Broad Architect: Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Associate Firm: Gensler Location: Los Angeles From the AIA Jury: Simultaneously sedate and spectacular. It fits the context of the visually exuberant arts buildings in this neighborhood. More than holding its own as a figure, it also engages and takes the user in. The dark body-like, shapely vault is a beautiful counterpoint to the bright, thick, patterned light veil. The design intention is clear and carried through at every scale. The types of space created are unusual but engaging and composed. Project: Chicago Riverwalk Architect: Ross Barney Architects and Sasaki Associates Location: Chicago From the AIA Jury: A gift to city, it embraces Chicago's layered, diverse history by providing a range of amenities that provide forward looking opportunities. Transforms the once neglected downtown riverfront into a vast public space. Design that touches everyone. Subtle moments of education and insight into the ecology of the river, educating visitors and residents. It is the reinvention of urban life that brings attention back to the waterfront. Project: Gohar Khatoon Girls' School Architect: Robert Hull, FAIA, and the University of Washington, Department of Architecture Location: Mazar-i-Sharif, Afghanistan From the AIA Jury: A beautiful and restrained aesthetic with limited means. Architecture is a modern take on Afghan history and masonry construction. This elevates respect for women and girls overall when state resources are used to this extent and design, adding an intent to create an urban oasis and promote community engagement. This space and the process communicates a new era for girls and women very powerfully. It is remarkably resourceful by integrating natural sustainability measures while operating within a weak infrastructure in the country. Project: Manhattan Districts 1/2/5 & Spring Street Salt Shed Architect: Dattner Architects in association with WXY architecture + urban design Location: New York City From the AIA Jury: The Salt storage building took what is usually an industrial construction built as economically as possible into urban art. It raises the bar significantly for civic infrastructure. Unapologetic platonic shape with beautiful skin with commitment to civic expression, environmental responsibility, and sensitivity to the urban context design solution that successfully integrates critical services into the neighborhood. The pursuit of a visual oxymoron to sanitation, and investment therein, is laudable and uplifting to an entire neighborhood and heavily used city corridor. Highly innovative. Project: Mercer Island Fire Station 92 Architect: Miller Hull Partnership Location: Mercer Island, Washington From the AIA Jury: Operations drives design and the execution is flawless. A necessary renovation turned modern reinterpretation of a traditional civic building into a simple box with layers of transparency that visually and physically connect the functions to the street. Great balance of functionality and warmth of materials make this a beautiful facility. Balanced work and relaxation are desired combo for firefighting facilities and certainly that balance is achieved here. As a public project, it is clearly a labor of love. Super judicious use of materials; great scale, sense of public awareness. Best of all this honors the incredibly hard working firefighters deserving of such a light space. Project: New United States Courthouse Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP Location: Los Angeles From the AIA Jury: The design's fascination with natural light and white spaces is nicely contrasted by the golden wood interior figures and floors. The building's form is a representation of site and topography, functionality, environmental performance, civic presence, and public spaces. Traditional materials and architectural elements enliven its civic presence, while modern elements introduced through the glass assembly façade create an iconic image for a 21st Century courthouse building while also providing positive environmental performance. This powerful composition and the generosity of its public spaces gives the project a clear civic presence, separating it from its commercial neighbors. Project: Vol Walker Hall & the Steven L. Anderson Design Center Architect: Marlon Blackwell Architects Location: Fayetteville, Arkansas From the AIA Jury: A complimentary and progressive pairing of modern and traditional forms. Consistent orchestration of natural light and a sparse but powerful use of red to make landmark moments in the building is invigorating. Sets the opportunity for an interesting contrast between the old and new wings. The expanded facility unites all three departments – architecture, landscape architecture, and interior design – under one roof for the first time, reinforcing the School’s identity and creating a cross-disciplinary, collaborative learning environment. The overall design is a didactic model, establishing a tangible discourse between the past and present while providing state-of-the-art-facilities for 21st century architectural and design education. Every space seems equally well resolved, simple, elegant Project: Washington Fruit & Produce Company Headquarters Architect: Graham Baba Architects Location: Yakima, Washington From the AIA Jury: This sits on the landscape beautifully and creates space for meaningful community. The oasis among the warehouses is functional, sustainable, spatial and formal. The design idea is integral and cohesive. An idea with depth. Occupied spaces are oriented towards the heart of the place - the courtyard, avoiding views towards the surrounding freeway and industrial warehouses; earth berms surrounding the building focalize views out to the landscape and blurring the boundary of architecture and site. The owners’ commitment to creating a respite from the industrial environment for their employees led to an exploration of curating views and outdoor spaces. The result is a workspace that encourages quiet contemplation, community and productivity.
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Strike Out

There will be no AIA Twenty-five Year Award winner this year
For the first time since the Twenty-Five Year award program was opened in 1971, the AIA has decided that there is no winner. The award honors a building that has "stood the test of time for 25-35 years and continues to set standards of excellence for its architectural design and significance," according to the AIA. Moreover, the building must completed, in good shape, and not be significantly changed from its intended design. In 2017, the Twenty-five Year Award went to the Grand Louvre – Phase 1, by I.M.Pei & Partners (Pei Cobb Freed & Partners). According to a statement released by the AIA to AN, the jury "felt that there were submissions that appeal to architects and there were those that appeal to the public. The consensus was that the Twenty-five Year Award should appeal to both. Unfortunately, this year the jury did not find a submission that it felt achieved twenty-five years of exceptional aesthetic and cultural relevance while also representing the timelessness and positive impact the profession aspires to achieve." Needless to say, this is quite a snub to any buildings completed between 1983 and 1993. While it's hard to speculate what the top contenders would have been, perhaps this is also a comment on the speed of demolition and the challenges of preserving outstanding buildings from this decade. The 2018 jury included Lee Becker, FAIA, Hartman-Cox Architects (Washington, D.C.); Anne Marie Decker, FAIA, Duvall Decker Architects (Jackson, Miss.); Susan Johnson, AIA, Strata Architecture + Preservation (Kansas City, Mo.); Anna Jones, Assoc. AIA, Shyft Collective (Johnston, Iowa); Merilee Meacock, AIA, KSS Architects (Princeton, N.J.); Robert Miller, FAIA, Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (Seattle); Sharon Prince, Grace Farms Foundation (New Canaan, Conn.); Rob Rogers, FAIA, Rogers Partners (New York); student representative Caitlin Jean Kessler, the University of Arizona.
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Quacking Around

Here are the best architectural ducks of 2017
It has been 40 years since Learning from Las Vegas introduced the world to the idea of the architectural duck. Though often held up as everything that is wrong with postmodernism, ducks seem to have some real lasting power. Every year, a number of projects take the idea of the duck a few steps further. 2017 has been no exception. Here are some of this year’s most notable ducks. LEGO House  – Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) Billund, Denmark There may be no toy in existence which has had a bigger impact on the minds of future architects than Legos. Located in Billund, Denmark, BIG’s LEGO House takes the idea of a duck to an extreme. The LEGO House’s is comprised of 21 LEGO-shaped volumes, with round skylights on the top level resembling the iconic two-by-four LEGO block. The project was conceived as an interactive attraction for the Billund’s Downtown, where LEGO is headquartered. Apple Flagship Store – Foster + Partners Chicago, Illinois Over the past decade and a half, Apple has been constructing flagship stores around the world by designers such as Bohlin Cywinski Jackson and Norman Foster. Their latest seems to take the company’s branding very seriously. The new Foster-designed Chicago flagship takes the undeniable form of an Apple laptop. Early rumors predicted the ultra-thin long-span carbon fiber roof would be adorned with the iconic apple symbol. While that rumor never proved to be true, the grey roof from above still resembles a giant Macbook Pro. "Domestikator" – Atelier Van Lieshout Paris, France Though originally created in 2015, "Domestikator" by Atelier Van Lieshout made its way back into the headlines when the Louvre refused to display the building-size artwork this year. The Louvre’s art director, Jean-Luc Martinez, stated that the fear of “being misunderstood by visitors” was the reason for the reversal in plans to show the work during the FIAC International Contemporary Art Fair in the Tuileries Gardens. Atelier Van Lieshout’s founder, Joep Van Lieshout, had planned to live in the structure through the duration of the festival. Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino Hollywood, Florida Still under construction, the Seminole Hard Rock Hotel & Casino is a $1.5-billion entertainment development that takes the shape of a immense electric guitar body. At 450 feet tall, the hotel will include 600 rooms, multiple restaurants, and a 41,000-square-foot spa. While the shape of the hotel does not include the neck or head of the guitar, a series of six vertical fins resembling guitar strings run up the front of the building. Rather than a typical groundbreaking, the project had a “guitar smashing ceremony,” and is expected to be complete in 2019. Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, American Museum of Natural History - Studio Gang Architects Washington, D.C. Studio Gang is no stranger to biomorphic forms in its designs. The new addition and renovation to the American Museum of Natural History, currently still in the design phases, takes this interest a few steps further. While the exterior resembles a weathered rock face, the interior takes on the form of a full-out natural cave. Though formally resembling a subterranean cavern, vast expanses of glass bring bright natural light into the space. The 235,000-square-foot Gilder Center is expected to open in 2020.
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Made in the Shade

2017 Best of Design Awards for Civic – Cultural
2017 Best of Design Award for Civic - Cultural: Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art Architect: SO-IL with Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Location: Davis, California Defining the museum as a landscape of cultivation, the design of the recently established Manetti Shrem Museum at the University of California, Davis, captures the Central Valley’s spirit of optimism, imagination, and invention. “Cultivation” has a divergent etymology, on one hand rural, on the other, urban-bourgeois. The overarching “Grand Canopy” seeks to embrace both contexts, extending a rolling form patchworked with aluminum beams over both site and building. An environmental silhouette, the design provides identity and awareness to multiple constituencies. "The project makes me optimistic for architecture in the U.S. —intelligent and rigorous architecture that is also delightful and humanist at the same time.  I love how the building connects an intimate experience to the scale of the landscape around it." —Eric Bunge, principal, nARCHITECTS (juror) Contractor: Whiting-Turner Structural Engineer: Rutherford & Chekene Mechanical Engineer: WSP Lighting: Fisher Marantz Stone Canopy Engineer: Front   Honorable Mention Name: Chrysalis Designer: MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY Place: Columbia, Maryland Chrysalis is an amphitheater, but it is first a pavilion in a park, a tree house, and a placemaking public artwork, ready to be activated at any moment. Here, temporary occupations are staged under a series of cascading arches that vary in size and function: a structural system that gives form to play.
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42 Categories

Here are the winners of the 2017 AN Best of Design Awards
The 2017 AN Best of Design Awards was our most successful yet. After expanding the categories to a whopping 42, we got over 800 submissions that made the judging more difficult than ever. Projects in all shapes and sizes came from firms big and small from every corner of the country. While we were surprised by the quantity of submissions, we were not surprised by the quality of the work put forth by our trusty base of architects and designers. There were some telling trends, however. First, the Adaptive Reuse category could have been three times as big as it was, because almost every category received some kind of reuse project. From lofts to retail spaces in disused buildings, the amount of old structures made new is astounding and speaks to larger movements in U.S. architecture. Reclaimed spaces are currently stylish and it is generally better for the environment and local culture when we reintegrate existing structures into their cities. One surprise was that our Northeast Building of the Year, the MASS MoCA renovation by Bruner/Cott Architects, took home the prize. The massive reuse project skillfully renegotiates an old factory, which the jury found to be more successful and important than some other new buildings that might have won in the past. Similarly, for Midwest Building of the Year, we saw a tie between two powerhouse campus projects. Studio Gang’s University of Chicago Campus North Residential Commons and WEISS/MANFREDI’s Kent State Center for Architecture and Environmental Design ignited a strong debate among the jury, and in the end they both proved worthy of the award. It is refreshing to see such good architecture being realized in the Midwest, and it says something about the state of architecture nationwide. Our jury this year was a blast as always, with a very talented group that sparked vigorous discussions and refined the way we look at architecture. It is always good to get more people involved in the conversation, and we are constantly shifting our views on what is relevant and interesting. We hope you enjoy this selection of winners and honorable mentions, and we look forward to hearing from you next year as we keep searching out the best architecture and design to award! William Menking, editor in chief Matt Shaw, senior editor We will be updating this list over the next few days with winner and honorable mention profiles. To see the complete feature, don't miss our 2017 Best of Design Awards issue, out now! 2017 AN Best of Design Awards Building of the Year Midwest Winners (tie) University of Chicago Campus North Residential Commons Studio Gang Chicago Kent State Center For Architecture and Environmental Design WEISS/MANFREDI Architecture/Landscape/Urbanism Kent, Ohio Building of the Year West Winner Point Loma Nazarene University Science Complex Carrier Johnson + CULTURE San Diego, California Building of the Year Northeast Winner The Robert W. Wilson Building at MASS MoCA Bruner/Cott Architects North Adams, Massachusetts Building of the Year Mid-Atlantic Winner Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University Steven Holl Architects Princeton, New Jersey Building of the Year Southwest Winner Arizona State University Beus Center for Law and Society Ennead Architects Phoenix Building of the Year Southeast Winner Grove at Grand Bay Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) Coconut Grove, Florida Restoration Winner The Benacerraf House Michael Graves Architecture & Design Princeton, New Jersey Honorable Mentions ROW DTLA Produce Renovation Rios Clementi Hale Studios Los Angeles Aurora St. Charles Senior Housing Weese Langley Weese Architects Aurora, Illinois Adaptive Reuse Winner The Contemporary Austin Jones Center Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis Architects Austin, Texas Honorable Mentions New Lab at the Brooklyn Navy Yard Marvel Architects Brooklyn, New York MASS MoCA, The Robert W. Wilson Building Bruner/Cott Architects North Adams, Massachusetts Building Renovation Winner Black House Oza / Sabbeth Architecture Sagaponack, New York Honorable Mentions Billboard Building SHULMAN + ASSOCIATES Miami The Beckoning Path BarlisWedlick Architects Armonk, New York Lighting – Outdoor Winner Longwood Gardens Renovation L’Observatoire International Kennett Square, Pennsylvania Honorable Mentions University of Iowa, Hancher Auditorium Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design Iowa City, Iowa City Point Mall Focus Lighting Brooklyn, New York Lighting – Indoor Winner Second Avenue Subway Domingo Gonzalez Associates New York Honorable Mention Body Factory BFDO Architects New York Civic – Administrative Winner Boston Emergency Medical Services The Galante Architecture Studio Boston Honorable Mentions United States Courthouse, Los Angeles Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Los Angeles San Diego Central Courthouse Skidmore, Owings & Merrill San Diego Civic – Cultural Winner Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art SO-IL with Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Davis, California Honorable Mention Chrysalis MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY Columbia, Maryland Civic – Educational Winner Elmhurst Community Library Marpillero Pollak Architects Queens, New York Honorable Mentions Lakeview Pantry Wheeler Kearns Architects Chicago University of California, San Diego Jacobs Medical Center CannonDesign La Jolla, California Hospitality Winner Broken Rice Undisclosable Denver Honorable Mention Wilshire Grand Tower Complex AC Martin Los Angeles Office & Retail Winner Albina Yard LEVER Architecture Portland, Oregon Honorable Mentions Cummins Indy Distribution Headquarters Deborah Berke Partners Indianapolis Zurich North America Headquarters Goettsch Partners Schaumburg, Illinois Facade Winner United States Courthouse - Los Angeles Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Los Angeles Honorable Mention University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, Kate Tiedemann College of Business ikon .5 architects, Harvard Jolly Architects St. Petersburg, Florida Green – Residential Winner Casa Querétaro DesignBridge Chicago Honorable Mention Inhabit Solar Cabana Inhabit Solar Queens, New York Green – Civic Winner Princeton University Embodied Computation Lab The Living Princeton, New Jersey Honorable Mention United States Courthouse, Los Angeles Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Los Angeles Infrastructure Winner 10th and Wyandotte Parking Garage BNIM Kansas City, Missouri Interior – Residential Winner Chilmark House Schiller Projects with Lisa Gray of GrayDesign Chilmark, Massachusetts Honorable Mention Capsule Loft Joel Sanders Architect New York Interior – Retail Winner Health Yoga Life BOS|UA Cambridge, Massachusetts Interior – Workplace Winner Memphis Teacher Residency archimania Memphis, Tennessee Honorable Mention RDC-S111 Urban Office Retail Design Collaborative Long Beach, California Landscape – Private Winner LaGrange Landscape Murray Legge Architecture La Grange, Texas Honorable Mention De Maria Garden Gluckman Tang Architects Bridgehampton, New York Landscape – Public Winner Confetti Urbanism Endemic (Clark Thenhaus) San Francisco Honorable Mentions Farnham-Connolly State Park Pavilion Touloukian Touloukian (Pavilion Architect) with Crosby Schlessinger Smallridge (Landscape Architect) Canton, Massachusetts The Meriden Green Milone & MacBroom Meriden, Connecticut Mixed Use Winner North Main Bates Masi + Architects East Hampton, New York Honorable Mention Brickell City Centre Arquitectonica Miami Residential – Multi Unit Winner True North EC3 Detroit Honorable Mentions American Copper Buildings SHoP Architects New York 2510 Temple Tighe Architecture Los Angeles Residential – Single Unit Winner Michigan Lake House Desai Chia Architecture with Environment Architects Leelanau County, Michigan Honorable Mentions Constant Springs Residence Alterstudio Architecture Austin, Texas Upstate Teahouse Tsao & McKown Pound Ridge, New York Urban Design Winner India Basin Skidmore, Owings & Merrill San Francisco Honorable Mentions Atlanta’s Park Over GA400 Rogers Partners and Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects Atlanta The Reconstruction of Astor Place and Cooper Square WXY New York Small Spaces Winner Five Fields Play Structure Matter Design + FR|SCH Projects Lexington, Massachusetts Honorable Mention Attic Transformer Michael K Chen Architecture New York Unbuilt – Commercial/Civic Winner The Ronald O. Perelman Center at The World Trade Center REX New York Honorable Mention Lima Art Museum (MALI) Young Projects Lima, Peru Unbuilt – Infrastructure Winner The Regional Unified Network ReThink Studio New York Honorable Mention Rogers Partners Galveston Bay, Texas Unbuilt – Landscape Winner Maker Park STUDIO V Architecture Brooklyn, New York Honorable Mentions The Statue of Liberty Museum FXFOWLE Liberty Island, New York Pier 55 Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects New York Unbuilt – Residential Winner 14 White Street DXA studio with NAVA New York Honorable Mentions Long Island City Oyster Carlos Arnaiz Architects (CAZA) New York Necklace Residence REX Long Island, New York Young Architects Winner mcdowellespinosa architects Charlottesville, Virginia and Brooklyn, New York Honorable Mentions Spiegel Aihara Workshop San Francisco Hana Ishikawa Chicago Temporary Installation Winner Living Picture T+E+A+M Lake Forest, Illinois Honorable Mentions Big Will and Friends Architecture Office Syracuse, New York and Eindhoven, the Netherlands Parallax Gap FreelandBuck Washington, D.C. Representation – Analog Winner Cosmic Metropolis Van Dusen Architects Conceptual Honorable Mention Trash Peaks DESIGN EARTH 2017 Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism Architectural Representations – Digital Winner Three Projects SPORTS New York Honorable Mentions MIDDLE EARTH: DIORAMAS FOR THE PLANET NEMESTUDIO Conceptual New Cadavre Exquis NEMESTUDIO Conceptual Digital Fabrication Winner Under Magnitude MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY Orlando, Florida Honorable Mentions Flotsam & Jetsam SHoP Architects Miami As We Are Matthew Mohr Studios Columbus, Ohio New Materials Winner Indiana Hardwood Cross-Laminated Timber IKD Columbus, Indiana Research Winner Snapping Facade Jin Young Song (University at Buffalo, Dioinno Architecture) Conceptual Honorable Mention The Framework Project LEVER Architecture with the Framework Project Portland, Oregon Student Work Winner Preston Outdoor Education Station el dorado inc Kansas State University, College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Elmdale, Kansas Honorable Mentions Waldo Duplex el dorado inc Kansas State University, College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Kansas City, Missouri Big Vic and the Blue Furret Rajah Bose California College of the Arts San Francisco, California A special thanks to our 2017 AN Best of Design Awards Jury! Morris Adjmi Principal, Morris Adjmi Architects Emily Bauer Landscape Architect, Bjarke Ingels Group Eric Bunge Principal, nARCHITECTS Matt Shaw, Senior Editor, The Architect’s Newspaper Nathaniel Stanton Principal, Craft Engineer Studio Irene Sunwoo Director of Exhibitions, GSAPP
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Ward Village

The facade on Honolulu’s Ae’o tower will make wind visible
Want to live in Hawaii? The Howard Hughes Corporation is building a 40-story residential tower in Honolulu's Kaka’ako neighborhood. The 3.6-acre community, known as Ward Village, includes Ae’o tower designed by the Seattle office of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (BCJ), the same firm behind the recently-completed Manetti Shrem Museum at UC Davis. The glass-clad tower is officially titled Ae’o and will sit atop a podium that includes Whole Foods Market. This will provide street level retail, while the tower itself will house 466 units. Tom Kirk, a partner at BCJ, told The Architect's Newspaper (AN) that the "Ae’o tower plays a crucial role in the development of the larger Ward Village project." "Great care was afforded to panoramic vistas within the tower and amenity deck that respect the mauka (mountains) and makai (ocean) views," Kirk said. The placement of project components such as the seventh-floor amenity level and a sky terrace "honor the unique environment and promote Hawaiian lifestyle." To achieve this, BCJ used the Ae'o tower's skin as a device to transmit the island way of life. "The idea of taking a force in nature such as wind, an important element in Hawaiian culture, and abstracting it into a built form was particularly intriguing to us," said Kirk. "Wind cannot be seen, but is felt; we extracted invisible waves of the trade winds around the islands and represented it as 3-D folds in the podium screen. In order to articulate the mass of the tower, view windows, or ‘wings,’ peel off the like wind-swept waves to create a heightened sense of place. This positions the residence living spaces toward the stunning ocean view, while allowing for a profound connection back toward the mountains." The Ae'o tower is due for completion next year. Kirk will speaking about the project in greater detail at the upcoming Facades+ AM conference on September 25 in Philadelphia. There, he will be joined by Jeff Goldstein, a principal at DIGSAU; Petar Mattioni, a partner at KSS Architects; and moderator Jon McCandlish, an associate at KieranTimberlake. Using the Ae'o tower as a precedent, Kirk will join his fellow panelists to discuss how facade performance can encompass more than just technical environmental properties. "I think conversations about envelope performance focus a lot on U-value, or air tightness, or technical environmentally performative aspects," McCandlish told AN. "That is obviously critical and some of the primary criteria we as designers use when considering building facades. However, the idea of performance as a phenomenon, being something that provides layering, texture—these don't have to be additive criteria, but something that works in symbiosis with environmental performance." Facades+AM Philadelphia is being held at the National Museum of American Jewish History. More information on the conference can be found at am.facadesplus.com. Seating is limited.