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Exhibit Columbus 2019 celebrates the value of good design and community

In a small Indiana town, a rich architectural legacy is celebrated with an annual exploration of architecture, art, design, and community. In its second exhibition run (it’s first in 2017) Exhibit Columbus features 18 site-responsive installations that use Columbus, Indiana’s heritage as inspiration and context while highlighting the role that community plays in growing a vibrant city. This year’s exhibition explores “good design” and “community,” a reference to the 1986 exhibition Good Design and the Community: Columbus, Indiana at the National Building Museum in Washington, D.C. The early exhibit championed town business leader and philanthropist J. Irwin Miller’s hometown pride by emphasizing the community’s process and involvement in building renowned architecture. As his community-based, activist approach resurges to mold this year’s theme, Exhibit Columbus becomes an architectural showcase aimed at doing good for the people. Bryony Roberts Studio’s Soft Civic is a complimentary showstopper to arguably the most civic site of the exhibition, Columbus’ City Hall, designed by Edward Charles Bassett of SOM (1981). The two cantilevered steel beams masked in brick veneer, generous lawn, and lengthy walkway toward a broad staircase frames the collection of colorful woven and steel structures. The installation articulates the many different vantage points afforded in civic life—play, performance, or protest; on the lawn, the steps, or at the front door. The solid brick planar facade that meets a clear glazed half-circle atrium fundamentally shapes the installation. These elements reveal layers of circles that slice (at an angle) and frame (vertically or horizontally) a new reading of the municipal building. The installation will offer programming opportunities for the community, including but not limited to a democracy day and youth summit with musical performances. An interview with Bryony Roberts in collaboration with Brooklyn-based textile workshop Powerhouse Arts describes the laborious process of weaving the large structures. (Courtesy Spirit of Space) Understorey, a project by Hans Tursak (MIT School of Architecture + Planning) and Viola Ago (the Ohio State University Knowlton School of Architecture), is an open-air vivarium, a place of life, built from a combination of off-the-shelf agricultural products and custom, digitally fabricated structural elements. Understorey is an ecological education center (like many of this year’s installations) that highlights a cross-section of southern Indiana’s geological specimens taken from quarries, forests, and urban sites. The pavilion is an architectural expression devoid of aesthetic neglect commonly seen in environmentally conscious design.  Corn is no surprise in Indiana. The leading crop covers one-quarter of the state and is traditionally processed as animal feed and ethanol. Though Boston and Kigali, Rwanda-based MASS Design Group surprised Hoosiers with an already familiar scene in Corn / Meal. What. From the street view, the installation looks like a standard, well-maintained miniature cornfield. Upon entry, maze-like corridors made of corn lead to a tangled serpentine picnic table within a dedicated open clearing. When read as an absurdist, formalist sculpture referencing local tropes such as corn and the always-communal picnic table, it’s actually one of the more successful installations. An interview with Caitlin Taylor, MASS Design Group’s Design Director, as she describes the depth of research for Corn / Meal and the need for education around food production. (Courtesy Spirit of Space) PienZa Sostenible, led by architect Carlos Zedillo Velasco and his brother Rodrigo Zedillo Velasco, present Las Abejas, a series of homes for bees. The project brings internationally-recognized Mexican architects, like Tatiana Bilbao Estudio and Rozana Montiel Arquitectos, to share their countries’ expertise as regional leaders of apiculture products worldwide. Located in a humble Dan Kiley landscape in front of Eero Saarinen’s Irwin Conference Center (1954) visitors are encouraged to consider the importance of bees everywhere in order to sustain our food and environment. Two remaining installations from the inaugural exhibition aren’t leftovers but more so savor-the-flavor of a less-didactic exhibition concerning architecture. Oyler Wu Collaborative’s all-white, tectonic pavilion, The Exchange, still notably stands in the plaza of the Irwin Conference Center, just moments away from PienZa Sostenible's bee homes. Nestled in a more intimate setting outside the William O. Hogue House, Formafantasma’s Window to Columbus originally pledged to display stories of materials that were used to define Washington Street and Columbus. Though, for the Good Design and the Community opening weekend, the significant structure displayed this year’s marketing material. It reminds us that Exhibit Columbus’s impact goes beyond any one installation as the program leaves a lasting impact on the downtown, and more importantly, how people live and play downtown.
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Building on the Past

Barozzi/Veiga will tame the Art Institute of Chicago with sprawling masterplan
The Art Institute of Chicago is likely to receive a much-needed, multiphased makeover courtesy the Barcelona-based firm Barozzi/Veiga. The Chicago Tribune broke the news that the award-winning Spanish studio is in the early stages of dreaming up how the museum’s sprawling, 126-year-old campus could become a more porous, inclusive environment that interacts more directly with the city itself and features easier internal circulation.  The move is a major goal of the museum’s current president and director James Rondeau who, when he stepped into the job in 2016, began searching for an architect to take on revamping the entire site. According to the Tribune, things are moving forward slowly, albeit on purpose. Rondeau said that, for now, firm principals Fabrizio Barozzi and Alberto Veiga are “partners to dream (up) the future” and that they’ll consider how the museum might look through the lenses of a five-year, 10-year, and 15-year, plan.   The long-time problem with the Institute, critics have frequently complained, is that it’s too inwardly-focused. Bounded by Michigan Avenue on its western edge and Grant Park on its other three sides, the architecture takes up what’s arguably one-twelfth of the surrounding landscape, and it’s not even one large building; two of Chicago’s train lines literally splice through the center of the campus, forcing a bridge/building that doubles as an elongated exhibition hall to connect its entrance with the majority of the back galleries. Since it opened in 1893 for the World’s Columbia Exposition, seven additional buildings have been knit strangely into the site.  The last time the museum was updated was in 2009 when Renzo Piano completed its Modern Wing in the northeastern corner, which brought 264,000-square-feet to the now one-million-square-foot campus. Though the contemporary addition complemented the rest of the architecture’s Beaux-Arts style, brought ample diffused daylight into the new gallery spaces, and provided a “main street-like” hall that links it to the existing building, the structure is just one part of an expansive art museum that needs more attention.  Rondeau seems to think that Barozzi/Veiga can take the same great ideas implemented in the Modern Wing and build upon them with an overall masterplan. The design duo’s most recent claim to fame is the Szczecin Philharmonic Hall in Poland, which in 2015 won them the European Prize for Contemporary Architecture-Mies van Der Rohe Award. That project, much like Piano’s museum addition, utilized both light and shape as focal design elements to express a welcoming and artfully authoritative tone that respected the surrounding city. Rondeau told The Tribune he wants the architects to help them open up the museum’s facade onto Michigan Avenue, but its iconic steps and its lion statues are here to stay.   This push to elevate the campus as a whole is a big deal considering the size of the Institute. It’s the second-largest art museum in the United States behind the Met and houses 300,000 items in its permanent collection. But Barozzi and Veiga aren’t ready to release any design ideas just yet. The only thing that’s certain is that they’ll have to work around some serious logistical issues including the fact that they can’t build anything taller than the current structures and can’t go past its four street perimeters. 
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One to Watch

The Railyards in Sacramento will be America's next big urban development
A neglected parcel of land once home to a leg of the First Transcontinental Railroad could become the next Hudson Yards-like mega-development in the United States. The former Union Pacific Railyards spans 244-acres just north of downtown Sacramento, California,—the largest urban infill site in the country—and is currently being eyed for several large-scale projects. Built in the 1860s, the site served the western terminus of a 1,912-mile-long stretch of rail line that extended from Council Bluffs, Iowa, to the Oakland Long Wharf in San Francisco Bay. Old, existing brick buildings used as maintenance shops in the yard's heyday still exist on the massive industrial plot and serve up sour views for drivers along Interstate 5 or passengers on flights headed into the nearby airport.  Sacramento has long had a difficult relationship with the Railyards—environmental remediation has been ongoing for decades—but recent investment in the adjacent Downtown Commons district has brought in significant interest in revamping the underused land next door. For example, the Golden 1 Center, a new high-tech arena for the city’s NBA franchise, the Sacramento Kings, finished up construction in 2016 and has spurred the introduction of new hotels and businesses in the area.  Around the same time the venue was completed, the local city council approved a planning entitlement submitted by Downtown Railyard Ventures, a subsidiary of the development group, LDK Ventures, that bought the Railyards in 2010 for $18 million. The ambitious company has a masterplan to make the Union Pacific return to its roots as a central hub of activity and innovation. In the next several decades, The Railyards, as the project is formally being marketed, will become a mixed-use urban landscape made to attract local residents, tech workers, and tourists. In total, there’s set to be 30 acres of green space, 70,000 square feet of retail, up to 10,000 residential units, 5 million square feet of office space, a 1,000-room hotel, and a mass transit hub with a new Amtrak station.  Preservation will be a key component of redevelopment on the site—unlike at Hudson Yards—with the partial reuse of the “Central Shops” buildings and the old Southern Pacific Sacramento Depot. It’s suspected that this area will become some sort of tech district for the city. In addition, three major architectural projects already in the works will anchor the initial phase of development.  By far the biggest and most-talked-about development coming to Sacramento is a new, $250 million soccer stadium for a future MLS franchise. The city has been in talks to upgrade its own team, Republic FC, to major league status now that it’s secured long-term funding from billionaire businessman Ron Burkle. The proposed development would include a 20,000-seat sports and entertainment arena situated on 14-acres of the Railyards’ northeastern corner, as well as a surrounding 17-acres of commercial buildings and retail.  Visuals for the project have already been revealed by architecture and infrastructure engineering firm HNTB and feature a square-shaped, open-air bowl with red inverted triangles that wrap and protect a 360-degree canopy. Fans will have unencumbered views of the surrounding city from anywhere around the pitch. Housing is planned in between the arena and an upcoming 900,000-square-foot hospital by Kaiser Permanente. The healthcare giant announced in January that it had purchased 18 acres of land to build a state-of-the-art medical facility on the northwestern edge of the Railyards that will open in 2025 and offer services to the thousands of people who live downtown.  Other structures slated to come online include a light rail stop, two six-story office and retail buildings by RMW Architecture & Interiors, as well as a 175,000-square-foot museum. On the southernmost portion of the Railyards, there will be a 17-story complex housing the Sacramento County Courthouse. Designed by Miami-based studio MOTIV in collaboration with NBBJ, the largely-glass-clad structure is supposed to start construction this fall and open in 2023. 
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Public Palace

India's first sculpture park opens for a second season
India’s first public sculpture park opened last year in the sprawling Madhavendra Palace, a milestone for the country’s contemporary art scene. The palace's formal corridors and rooms have been curated as a uniquely rich pathway for visitors to The Sculpture Park to see new works of contemporary sculpture in each edition of the park’s programming. This year, 23 artists have brought new, often site-specific works to the palace, and over half of them live and work in India themselves.  “For most of my career as a gallerist and curator, I have been trying to break away from the white-box exhibition space,” 2019 edition curator Peter Nagy told Hyperallergic. “With this project, I am able to indulge my passions for art, architecture, and decor into a marvelous synthesis of the past and the present.”  Completed in 1892, the Palace is the best-preserved section of the Nahargarh Fort complex, which was designed to sit organically amongst the hills as a pleasure retreat for Maharaja Sawai Madho Singh, founder of the city of Jaipur. Twenty-three artists will explore ideas of landscape, politics, and colonialism in their works this year, amidst the backdrop of an Indian heritage landmark to create a striking context. From architectural explorations of the intersections of modern colonial and traditional styles to World War II radio relics, the pieces are varied in narrative as well as scale, but united by their common backdrop. The palace as sculpture park continues to exist as an example of public and private sectors working side-by-side for the proliferation of the arts. A collaboration between the Government of Rajasthan and Saat Saath Arts non-profit, The Sculpture Park states in its mission statement that the park is an example of an “India of the 21st century,” a "synthesis of the contemporary with the traditional, bringing art into the public realm and reclaiming public spaces.” But with works decrying hot-button issues such as the Kashmir border crises and the lingering effects of war and empire, it is difficult to see how the park's artists plan to work with governmental bodies to reform the topics this exhibition is expressing.  Yet, the public is responding. Just since the park’s opening, visitation to the palace has increased by 37 percent.
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Cradle-To-Grave Design

Hare & Hare tracks how cemeteries became thoughtful landscapes
Hare & Hare, Landscape Architects and City Planners Carol Grove and Cydney Millstein University of Georgia Press in association with Library of American Landscape History List price: $39.95; 264 pages Cemeteries are like cities. They need streets that efficiently accommodate traffic flow, harmonious neighborhoods of related structures, visual landmarks and vistas, and a sense of place that will attract not only its permanent residents but also visitors. Sidney J. Hare (1860–1938) was one of America’s most influential designers of such landscapes. “On a national level, Sid’s foremost contribution was his participation in the ideological and physical shaping of a new type of cemetery, one fit for the twentieth century,” write Carol Grove and Cydney Millstein in their book, Hare & Hare Landscape Architects and City Planners. What had once been spooky, gloomy, often remotely sited plots of land well outside the city limits for the dead, suddenly became, through the work of Hare and his son, S. Herbert Hare (1888–­1960), in-town locales that were very much alive. The father-son team of landscape architects, based in Kansas City, designed fifty-four cemeteries throughout the country and one in Costa Rica—among them, Forest Hill in Kansas City, where they would both eventually be buried. In Monongahela, Pennsylvania, and Grandview in Salem, Ohio, which would forever change the way the dead and the living interact. The team fashioned cities of the dead that incorporated macadam-paved roads that honored the natural topographies, introduced engaging architectural elements, along with lakes and plant features, and chose foliage for the ways they would change throughout the seasons. A kind of design mantra evolved for them: More nature and less marble and stone. The elder Hare “understood more than aesthetics,” the authors recount in this first-ever dual biography of the designers, for he was “grounded [too] in the technical aspects of dealing with nature.” Quoting Hare directly, the authors write that he considered the best cemetery to be a “botanical garden, bird sanctuary, and arboretum.” The book proves that some of the best-recognized and most prized city planning designs are often ones whose makers go uncredited. “It was not until the formation of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) in 1899 and Harvard and MIT’s offering courses geared toward future practitioners the next year that landscape architecture began to coalesce as a profession,” write Grove, a professor of art history and archaeology at the University of Missouri, and Millstein, founder and principal of the Architectural and Historical Research in Kansas City. This record of the Hares' lives and works reinforces the notion that the discipline of landscape architecture is “the fourth fine art after architecture, painting, and sculpture.” The moment the elder Hare enlisted his son to join the firm he established in Kansas City’s Gumbel Building in 1910, the two embarked on making some of the most resonant landscapes in America. One of the great American places is Kansas City’s Country Club District, for which Hare & Hare would plan some 2500 acres over a forty-year period. They would incorporate extant pasture land and wood into some of the residential neighborhoods, including Mission Hills, defined by narrow, sinuous roadways, interior parks or “parklets”, as they called them, and carefully chose flowering shrubs and sculptural trees. So obsessed was the father-son team during their work on the complex, which they began in 1913 with the developer, J.C. Nichols, that no element was too small to be accounted for—weathervanes, bridges, the fonts on the signage, the placement of public artworks, the locales for campfire sites and bridle paths. Grove and Millstein expertly detail the process for this city planning project, recounting that the Hares made more than two hundred finished drawings, apart from those they executed for some of their many individual residential commissions within the district. “Transformed by Hare & Hare’s plan—praised as beautiful, thoughtful, and original—Mission Hills was perhaps the finest neighborhood executed for Nichols,” conclude the authors. No landscape, no matter how seemingly topographically challenged, couldn’t be tamed and transformed by Hare & Hare. For their many works in Houston, for instance, the elder Hare’s vision for the new residential neighborhood of Forest Hill embraced as one of its defining scenic attributes what many would have considered its biggest natural obstacle—a swampy, sinuous bayou. Making that watery source one of its focal points was a revolutionary idea in its day. He and his son decided to depart from the strict street grid of nearby downtown Houston and instead fashion a series of roadways that radiated in arcs, outward like a giant fan. Meanwhile, their work in planning the city’s exclusive residential neighborhood known as River Oaks—some 2000 acres of land—endures. As the authors point out, “Fifty years after its inception, the architectural critic Ada Louise Huxtable condemned 1970s Houston, but noted River Oaks’ exceptional planning.” Other notable projects of theirs documented by the authors include Houston’s Hermann Park, on which the Hares worked for more than twenty-five years, the expansive grounds of Tulsa’s Villa Philbrook (now open to the public as the Philbrook Museum of Art), the city of Longview, Washington, the Lake of the Ozarks, and parks in Fort Worth, Dallas, Joplin, Missouri, and elsewhere. Ultimately, upon the younger Hare’s death in 1960, the firm could list some four thousand projects in more than thirty states, Canada, and Costa Rica. As Robin Karson, executive director of the Library of American Landscape History (LALH) points out in her preface, the book “covers so much formerly uncharted territory in the history of American landscape design.” Indeed, LALH’s ongoing mission is to keep laying the often ignored historical groundwork for the discipline of landscape architecture. Even though the book immerses readers at times in the thick brambles of city bureaucracies and office politics through which the designers had to hack their way, the personalities of the two men emerge, so much so that the book functions, too, as a revealing biography of them. We feel them in action. Of Herbert, the authors state, “…he recognized that good design was achieved both over the drafting board and in the field, not by one or the other.” “Sid and Herbert believed that good landscape architecture was both a science and an art,” the authors state. “Although they emphasized the practical, functional role of their profession, they firmly believed that if a city for a garden ‘is not to be a work of art, then it would be best not to build it.’” We are grateful the Hares designed it and built it. And readers should be grateful this book was published to keep their accomplishments acknowledged and flourishing.
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Dream Designs

Want to own a house designed by a renowned architect? Here are seven options currently on the market

While summer may be drawing to a close, daydreaming about beautiful houses has no season. For those who are particularly discriminating about architecture, and who happen to be in the market for a multi-million-dollar listing, there are plenty of options to run through. AN has rounded up seven houses designed by nationally and internationally renowned architects that are for sale right now. Do some window shopping below:

Marcel Breuer’s Gargarin House I Litchfield, CT

Between 1956 and 1957, the celebrated Bauhaus architect Marcel Breuer, whose masterpieces include New York’s Met Breuer museum (formerly the Whitney), designed a stunning home for Andrew and Jamie Gargarin in Litchfield, Connecticut. Sitting on 1.7 acres of gently sloping land, the low-slung house was constructed with steel, reinforced concrete, stone, and glass. Its styling is decidedly modern both inside and out, with materials and vistas that are sure to please any buyer with money to spare.

Perhaps the most unique feature in the Gargarin House I is the bush-hammered concrete fireplace. Its irregular form rises in the middle of the glass-walled living room, providing the home with one of its only architectural elements that is not strictly rectilinear. The fireplace and the storied house it occupies can be yours for $3.8 million.

Arthur Cogswell, Jr.’s Durham dream house Durham, NC

As the only house on this list priced under one million dollars (and still by only $50,000), Arthur Cogswell, Jr.’s midcentury modern design in Durham, North Carolina offers a comparatively affordable option for those looking to own property crafted by a notable architect. Cogswell is best known as a residential architect with modernist proclivities. Most of his projects have been completed for private clients in North Carolina.

This particular home is 3,259 square feet with four bedrooms and three full bathrooms. Because it has only had one owner since its initial construction, the house is remarkably well preserved. Images show that many of the rooms have maintained their original wood cabinetry, while the back deck is still covered by a geometric pergola. The room that has changed most significantly is the kitchen, which underwent a complete renovation to meet twenty-first-century standards of living. Built in 1966, the home sits on 2.33 acres and is listed for $950,000.

Steven Holl-designed Catskills getaway Middleburgh, NY

Nestled in a heavily wooded area in New York’s Catskills region, Steven Holl’s bright red “Y House” has hit the market for $1.6 million. The two main sections of the house (there is also a detached garage and a boathouse) branch off from one another to form the shape of the letter “Y”. They both terminate in outdoor spaces—balconies on the second floor and small patios on the ground floor. The roofline of the structure slopes upward toward this point, creating a volume that appears to open up to the mountain views.

Constructed in 1999, the house takes full advantage of its surroundings. From the interior, irregularly shaped windows frame the landscape in unexpected ways, while communal spaces benefit from larger, floor-to-ceiling glass. The 33-acre site also has a minimalist, glass-walled boathouse perched at the edge of a serene pond.

Richard Neutra’s midcentury masterpiece Weston, CT

In the quiet town of Weston, Connecticut, Betty Corwin is selling a house designed for her and her husband by Richard Neutra in 1955. Situated on a 4.3-acre lot above the Saugatuck River, the five-bedroom Corwin House is surrounded by mature trees and lush landscaping. With many of its original finishes still intact, including the yellow kitchen cabinetry and plenty of built-ins, the home is a particularly well-preserved example of midcentury modern residential architecture. Corwin, now in her 90’s, has made only a few changes to the kitchen appliances and bathrooms.

Perhaps best known for his extensive portfolio of house projects in California, Neutra built a number of modern residential structures throughout the mid-twentieth century. Listed at $2.7 million, the Corwin House is one of the architect’s two remaining homes in the state of Connecticut, presenting East Coast buyers with a rare chance to purchase a piece of his legacy.

Wine country stunner by Michael Palladino of Richard Meier Partners Santa Ynez, CA

Designed by Michael Palladino of Richard Meier Partners, this six-bedroom, eight-bathroom house sits in the Santa Ynez Valley northwest of Santa Barbara, California. Buyers of Son Sereno will have no shortage of space, inside or out. The home itself boasts 8,000 square feet of living space, while the 116-acre lot includes an olive grove and several riding trails. The scenery surrounding the contemporary structure is characteristic of this region of California—mature oak and sycamore trees dot a landscape of rolling green hills and vineyards.

Built in 2005, the building uses a combination of stucco and stone walls to support a high, curvilinear ceiling over the main living space. There is a wealth of amenities, including an attached three-car garage, two fireplaces, and panoramic views of the valley. The asking price is currently set at $7,900,000.

Paul Rudolph’s Milam Residence Ponte Vedra Beach, FL

As AN reported earlier this summer, Paul Rudolph’s beachside Milam Residence outside Jacksonville, Florida hit the market for $4,445,000. With a distinctive geometric facade that lends visual depth to the building, the Milam Residence presents potential buyers with the opportunity to own something that stands out in the coastal neighborhood, where most residential architecture prescribes to a more Mediterranean aesthetic. With 6,800 square feet of living space spread between the main building and a separate guest house, there is no shortage of space, either.

While Rudolph is better known for his institutional projects, including the Yale School of Architecture’s Paul Rudolph Hall, the Milam House is still a piece of history. Built in 1961 for the attorney Arthur Milam, the residence is being sold by the family of the original owners.

Rafael Viñoly-designed head-turner Ridgefield, CT

Rafael Viñoly’s most famous residential project may be his gleaming tower at 432 Park Avenue in New York City, but for those who prefer a more tranquil setting, a house he designed in Ridgefield, Connecticut is now on the market. Built in 1990 for Alice Lawrence, whose late husband Sylvan Lawrence was a real estate mogul in Manhattan, the house is a dramatic contemporary design composed primarily of concrete and glass. Designed for Mrs. Lawrence’s extensive art collection, the house comprises one part of a listing that includes a farmhouse next door and a total of 16 acres of land.

With three bedrooms, four bathrooms, and both indoor and outdoor pool options, the Lawrence House offers a taste of luxury to anyone who can afford its $9.8 million price tag.

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Not Bargain Bin

Gensler will lead the project team for Walmart's new headquarters
Gensler has been announced as the lead firm on the project team for the new Walmart headquarters in Arkansas. The 350-acre home office campus, centered around community, innovation, and sustainability, will be located between Central Avenue and Highway 102 in Bentonville, Arkansas Dan Bartlett, the executive vice president of corporate affairs at Walmart, announced the project team for the campus as design leaders across both the Arkansas community and the world. His team choice was intended to highlight the collaboration between global and local designers. The rest of the project team includes: Miller Boskus Lack Architects of Fayetteville, Arkansas, CEI Engineering Associates, Inc. of Bentonville, Walter P Moore of Houston, Sasaki of Watertown, Massachusetts, and the Los Angeles branch of landscape architecture firm SWA Group. The team will focus their abilities towards amenity buildings, low-cost engineering and material sourcing, a downtown extension, and wildlife preservation.  Douglas C. Gensler, Gensler's managing director and principal, issued the following comment for Walmart's website: “We are honored and humbled to be the creative partner helping shape Walmart’s future campus. The design is innovative, resilient, thoughtful and purpose-driven that places people at the heart of the company's next chapter. The new Walmart campus will embody the DNA attributes for a connected and successful work-place with the latest advances in technology and sustainability, while reflecting the Walmart culture and seamlessly integrating into the fabric of the community.” The new headquarters will span 20 buildings, with the "Razorback Regional Greenway" running through the center of the campus, harmonizing biking and walking trails that encourage internal mobility. The offices are expected to hold 14,000- to- 17,000 employees, and will join expanded cafeteria spaces, fitness spaces, a childcare facility, and accessible parking. The renderings, released in May, display office buildings boasting large windows with an abundance of natural light and open green spaces seeded with native vegetation that bolster the sustainable design.  Gensler has noted that the buildings will feature energy-efficient lighting and HVAC systems under the goal of creating a zero-waste environment that operates completely on renewable energy.  The new Walmart Arkansas headquarters will be another corporate campus that Gensler can add to their extensive resume; it joins Facebook’s one-million-square-foot headquarters in Menlo Park, California, the Washington Post Offices in Washington D.C., and the renovation of the Adobe campus in San Jose, California.
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Don't Wait Too Late

There's only one month left to enter Archpaper's 2019 Best of Design Awards
Don't wait until it's too late to enter the 2019 AN Best of Design Awards. There's only one month left until the October 4 deadline, so begin (or complete) your submissions today! With 50 comprehensive categories to choose from, there are more chances to win than ever before. This a great opportunity to make sure your latest completed, unbuilt, speculative, and research-based projects receive the recognition they deserve. Our esteemed jury, comprised of New Affiliates Co-Founder Jaffer Kolb; Selldorf Architects partner Sara Lopergolo; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill associate director Carlos Madrid III; The Architectural League of New York program director Anne Rieselbach; The Architect’s Newspaper executive editor Matt Shaw; and Oana Stănescu Studio founder Oana Stănescu, will select the best Canadian, Mexican, and US building, interior, installation, representation, renovation, public, urban, and student projects. Winners, Honorable Mentions, and Editor's Picks in all 50 categories will be announced in the special end-of-year Best of Design magazine, in dedicated articles on Archpaper.com and ANInteriormag.com, and extensively on our social media platforms. Winners will also receive a signed limited edition poster by famous radical architecture collective Archigram. Categories
  • Adaptive Reuse
  • Restoration & Preservation
  • Building Renovation — Single-Unit
  • Building Renovation — Multi-Unit
  • Building Renovation — Commercial
  • Building Renovation — Civic
  • Architectural Lighting — Indoor
  • Architectural Lighting — Outdoor
  • Architectural Representation — Analog
  • Architectural Representation — Digital
  • Cultural
  • Public
  • Education
  • Healthcare
  • Commercial — Hospitality
  • Commercial — Office
  • Commercial — Retail + Mixed Use
  • Digital Fabrication
  • Facades
  • Green Building
  • Infrastructure
  • Interior — Institutional
  • Interior — Healthcare
  • Interior — Hospitality
  • Interior — Residential
  • Interior — Retail
  • Interior — Workplace
  • Landscape — Residential
  • Landscape — Public
  • New Materials
  • Research
  • Residential — Multi-Unit
  • Residential — Single-Unit
  • Small Spaces
  • Temporary Installation
  • Exhibition Design
  • Unbuilt — Commercial
  • Unbuilt — Cultural
  • Unbuilt — Education
  • Unbuilt — Public
  • Unbuilt — Residential
  • Unbuilt — Urban Design
  • Unbuilt — Green
  • Unbuilt — Landscape
  • Unbuilt — Interior
  • Urban Design
  • Young Architects Award
  • Student Work — Individual
  • Student Work — Group
  • Student Work — Representation
Eligibility  In order for a project to be eligible for submission, it must have been completed within one year’s time of the submission deadline (October 2018). Landscape, Public, Unbuilt, and Representation projects must have been completed within two years time of the submission deadline (October 2017). The Best Of Design Awards are open to Canadian, Mexican, U.S. and international firms (e.g., architects/ designers/ consultants/ engineers/ manufacturers), but projects submitted must be located within Canada, Mexico, or The United States.
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Graham Grants

Graham Foundation announces 2019 organizational grant recipients

The Chicago-based Graham Foundation has released a list of organizations that will receive its coveted Production and Presentation Grants to pursue architecture-related projects this year. A total of 54 organizations will be presented with financial support from the foundation, with no grantee’s allocation exceeding $30,000 and few receiving the full amount requested. In line with the Graham Foundation’s mission to “foster the development and exchange of diverse and challenging ideas about architecture,” awardees will receive assistance with production-related expenses for a variety of undertakings that aim to enrich architectural discourse, including films, publications, exhibitions, and lectures. Final decisions were made on the basis of four criteria: originality, feasibility, capacity, and potential for impact.

The winning projects for 2020 are split into four distinct categories—exhibitions; film, video, and new media projects; public programs; and publications—and were submitted by a wide range of institutions, companies, and non-profits. Among the grantees are Boston’s MASS Design Group, Michael Sorkin’s Terreform, the Oslo Architecture Triennale, and the University of Chicago’s South Side Home Movie Project. Several past grant recipients received funding for new projects this year, including the Museum of Modern Art for a publication on the work of Robert Venturi and Mexico City-based LIGA-Space for Architecture, which is working to highlight Latin American designers in its annual public program. Here is the full list of the 2020 recipients and their respective projects:

EXHIBITIONS (19 awards)

Àkéte Art Foundation Lagos, Nigeria How To Build a Lagoon with Just a Bottle of Wine?, 2nd Lagos Biennial

ArchiteXX Syracuse, NY Now What?! Advocacy, Activism, and Alliances in American Architecture since 1968

Art Institute of Chicago Chicago, IL In a Cloud, in a Wall, in a Chair: Six Modernists in Mexico at Midcentury

Chicago Architecture Biennial Chicago, IL Graham Foundation Artistic Director

Cranbrook Art Museum Bloomfield Hills, MI Ruth Adler Schnee: Modern Designs for Living

Elmhurst Art Museum Elmhurst, IL Assaf Evron & Claudia Weber

El Museo Francisco Oller y Diego Rivera Buffalo, NY Paul Rudolph’s Shoreline Apartments

Equitable Vitrines Los Angeles, CA Florian Hecker

Landmark Columbus Foundation Columbus, IN Good Design and the Community: 2019 Exhibition, Exhibit Columbus

LIGA–Space for Architecture Mexico City, Mexico LIGA Public Program 2019–2020

Madison Square Park Conservancy New York, NY Martin Puryear: Liberty/Libertà: US Pavilion, 58th International Art Exhibition

Materials & Applications Los Angeles, CA Staging Construction

National Building Museum Washington, DC Architecture is Never Neutral: The Work of MASS Design Group

National Trust for Historic Preservation—Farnsworth House Plano, IL Edith Farnsworth Reconsidered

Oslo Architecture Triennale Oslo, Norway Enough: The Architecture of Degrowth, Oslo Architecture Triennale 2019

Serpentine Galleries London, United Kingdom Serpentine Pavilion 2019 by Junya Ishigami

Storefront for Art and Architecture New York, NY Building Cycles

Toronto Biennial of Art Toronto, Canada Learning from Ice

University of Illinois at Chicago—College of Architecture, Design, and the Arts Chicago, IL A Certain Kind of Life

FILM/VIDEO/NEW MEDIA PROJECTS (4 awards)

Architectural Association School of Architecture London, United Kingdom Architecture in Translation

The Funambulist Paris, France The Funambulist Network

MASS Design Group Boston, MA The Whole Architect: Giancarlo De Carlo

University of Chicago—South Side Home Movie Project Chicago, IL South Side Home Movie Project Interactive Digital Archive

PUBLIC PROGRAMS (6 awards)

Association of Architecture Organizations Chicago, IL 2019 Design Matters Conference

Harvard University—Graduate School of Design—African American Student Union Cambridge, MA Black Futurism: Creating a More Equitable Future

Independent Curators International New York, NY Curatorial Forum

Lampo Chicago, IL Lampo 2019 Concert Series at the Graham Foundation

New Architecture Writers London, United Kingdom Constructive Criticism

University of Michigan—A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning Ann Arbor, MI Re: Housing: Detroit

PUBLICATIONS (25 awards)

Anyone Corporation New York, NY Log: Observations on Architecture and the Contemporary City, Issues 47, 48, and 49

ETH Zurich—gta exhibitions Zurich, Switzerland Inside Outside / Petra Blaisse

Flat Out Inc. Chicago, IL Flat Out, Issues 5 and 6

Harvard University—Graduate School of Design–New Geographies Cambridge, MA New Geographies 11: Extraterrestrial

Haus der Kulturen der Welt Berlin, Germany Counter Gravity: The Architecture Films of Heinz Emigholz

Instituto Bardi/Casa de Vidro São Paulo, Brazil Casa de Vidro: The Bardis’ Life between Art, Architecture and Landscape

The Museum of Modern Art New York, NY Robert Venturi’s Complexity and Contradiction at Fifty

Northwestern University Press Evanston, IL Southern Exposure: The Overlooked Architecture of Chicago’s South Side

Paprika! New Haven, CT Paprika! Volume V

Places Journal San Francisco, CA Reservoir: Nature, Culture, Infrastructure

PRAXIS, Inc. Boston, MA PRAXIS, Issue 15: Bad Architectures

Produzioni Nero Scrl Rome, Italy Scenes from the Life of Raimund Abraham

REAL foundation London, United Kingdom Kommunen in der Neuen Welt: 1740–1972

Rice University—School of Architecture Houston, TX PLAT 9.0

The School of Architecture at Taliesin Scottsdale, AZ WASH Magazine, Issues 003 and 004

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum New York, NY Countryside, The Future

Southern California Institute of Architecture Los Angeles, CA LA8020

Standpunkte Basel, Switzerland Archetypes: David Ross

The Studio Museum in Harlem New York, NY The Smokehouse Associates

Terreform New York, NY UR (Urban Research) 2019

University of California, Los Angeles—Department of Architecture and Urban Design Los Angeles, CA POOL, Issue No. 5

University of Florida—Graduate School of Architecture Gainesville, FL VORKURS_Dérive

University of Maryland, College Park—School of Architecture, Planning and Preservation College Park, MD See/Saw, No. 2: Difference

University of Miami—School of Architecture Coral Gables, FL Cuban Modernism: Mid-Century Architecture, 1940–1970

Yale University Press New Haven, CT Mies van der Rohe: The Architect in His Time

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Kings of Leong

AN visits a Los Angeles LGBT Center designed to stand out
In recognition of the many services it has provided for its community for 50 years, the Los Angeles LGBT Center recently opened a brand new campus that was designed to stand out in May of this year. The Anita May Rosenstein Campus was collaboratively designed by Leong Leong and Killefer Flammang Architects to provide courses, space, and amenities for an estimated 42,000 lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and questioning youths and seniors in Los Angeles each month. The 183,000-square-foot campus offers many much-needed programs for the local LGBTQ community, including youth, senior and drop-in centers, a youth academy and a homeless shelter for up to 100 people. The campus is sited on a relatively quiet intersection at Santa Monica Boulevard and North McCadden Place in Hollywood, built across the street from The Village at Ed Gould Plaza, another facility owned by the Los Angeles LGBT Center which houses a theater, offices, art galleries and community meeting spaces. The campus’s 12 programs were formally separated from one another across the four-acre site to create the visual complexity and porosity of a typical college campus. “Inspired by the mission of the Center,” said Dominic Leong, one of the partners of Leong Leong, “the architecture is a cohesive mosaic of identities and programs rather than a singular iconic gesture.” The rounded edges, fritted glass, and cylindrical skylights are all nods to the circular logo for the Los Angeles LGBT Center, while lending the campus the added benefit of proudly standing out among its boxy neighbors. “The Center’s leaders gave KFA and Leong Leong a clear vision: that the design of the new Anita May Rosenstein Campus must reflect the boldness, optimism, and absolute certainty of the Center’s mission to care for, champion, and celebrate LGBT individuals and families,” said Barbara Flammang, one of the partners of Killefer Flammang Architects. “We hope that the design and formal expression of these buildings and open, landscaped spaces contribute to the flourishing of the people who live in, work at, and visit this wonderful place.” Boldness and openness are apparent design intentions even at night, when the edges of the building’s exterior are highlighted in purple neon, and one can see from the street that even some of the interior spaces appear thick with a purple haze. The layout of many of the building’s living spaces is reflective of many of the gestures prevalent in the coliving spaces being built today, such as WeLive and Second Home. The communal kitchen and main activity room, for instance, can appear as a single large room when the large sliding doors between them are held open, while the lightness and transparency of the design throughout encourages interaction among its clients and staff. Though the campus is now open and has already begun serving its community, the completion of its second phase remains highly anticipated. Expected to be completed early next year, Phase II will include 98 units for seniors and 25 apartments for younger tenants. The intergenerational nature of the campus was intended to spur the commingling of its diverse clientele.
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Best of Products Awards

Meet the winners of our 2019 Best of Products Awards

After hours of carefully deliberating over five hundred entries from our largest ever Best of Products Awards, we are excited to share the Winners, Honorable Mentions, and Editors’ Picks. These eighteen diverse categories cover a wide range of sectors, including building materials, acoustics, furnishings, finishes, tech products and tools, kitchens, baths, and more. Our judges evaluated submissions for originality, innovation, functionality, aesthetics, performance, and value, and selected one winner and two honorable mentions in each category. New this year, our editors also picked their favorite products in all 18 categories.

All images are courtesy of their respective manufacturers unless otherwise noted. The Best of Products Awards Jury: Lora Appleton Founder kinder MODERN & Female Design Council Constantin Boym Founder Boym Partners Gabrielle Golenda Products Editor The Architect’s Newspaper Alda Ly Principal and Founder Alda Ly Architecture & Design William Menking Editor in Chief The Architect’s Newspaper Fiona Raby Cofounder Dunne & Raby Categories:

Indoor Finishes and Surfaces

Winner ExCinere Dzek “It’s fascinating how this product brings the outside in, and then back outside again. It evokes an actual landscape in a way that’s subtle but special; a great talking point for your clients.” —Lora Appleton Honorable Mentions Matte Collection Callidus Guild iD Mixonomi Tarkett North America Editors' Picks Magna Recycled Glass Slab Walker Zanger Soft Onyx Fiandre Indoor Lighting and Electrical Winner Noctambule FLOS “The scale of this product is grand for a modular component. It’s monumental enough to look great in a large-scale palatial setting but can also be scaled down to an urban residential context.” —Lora Appleton Honorable Mentions Dorval Lambert & Fils RAY Sconce Stickbulb Editors’ Picks Plena Foscarini Haller E USM Fascio Medium Linear Chandelier with Crystal Visual Comfort & Co. Residential Interior Furnishings Winner Stille Standard Issue “The product is interesting because the manufacturer was able to produce something that is familiar but still new. It shows that shapes don’t always have to be reinvented. It represents a sort of aesthetic recycling.” —Constantin Boym Honorable Mentions Portal Armoire Henrybuilt Beanie Sofa Nea Studio Editors’ Picks 5M Chair soft limits Hull Collection O&G Studio Hillock Console Skylar Morgan Furniture   Commercial Interior Furnishings Winner Meredith Lounge Chair Poppin “If I saw a bunch of these chairs in an airport, I’d be very happy.” —Matt Shaw, The Architect’s Newspaper’s executive editor Honorable Mentions Divy Mobile 3form Racer Collection Blu Dot Editors’ Picks Swing Pair Landing Wilkhahn Acoustics Winner Trypta Luceplan “With more and more open ceilings in commercial offices, there hasn’t been a lot of innovation in how we deal with noise. This product is a good example of lighting that integrates acoustics panels.”—Alda Ly Honorable Mentions Kula Glass Unika Vaev Blade Luxxbox Editors’ Picks Open Spaces 2.0 CertainTeed Ceilings VaporSoft® Arktura Home Accessories Winner Alaire Collection Atlas Homewares Honorable Mentions Side Table Fink Furniture Vestalia LATOxLATO Editors’ Picks Smooth Operator Kit Garden Glory Soffio Foscarini Textiles Winner VEER Wolf-Gordon “There’s a subtlety to the combination of textures in this product that makes it strong. There’s something beautiful about the transition between its 2- and 3-dimensionality.”—Fiona Raby Honorable Mentions Scaramouche Dedar Tatami System Tarkett North America Editors’ Picks Gradation Shaw Contract The Bauhaus Project Designtex Baths Winner SONAR Wave Double Basin Laufen “The riveting around the edges creates a nice, soft touch.”—Gabrielle Golenda Honorable Mentions Petra Agape Elan Grid Shower Door VIGO Editors’ Picks SideKick Shower System Peerless Faucet SteamVection Steamhead ThermaSol Kitchens Winner Heritage Induction Pro Ranges Dacor “There’s a stereotype that induction cooktops aren’t powerful, but it’s nice to see this technology as an industrial-level product.”—Alda Ly Honorable Mention Space Theory Space Theory Emerald Finish True Residential Editors’ Picks Gunmetal Kitchen Amuneal Professional 7 Series Range Viking Range Touchless Kitchen Faucet Kohler Outdoor Lighting and Electrical Winner LP Xperi Louis Poulsen “This product has both uplight and downlight functions, so it goes beyond the typical scope of a streetlight and considers more ephemeral types of illumination.”—Gabrielle Golenda Honorable Mentions Pursuit Architectural Area Lighting Uma Mini Pablo Designs Editors’ Picks KFL Collection KIM Lighting CIRC Estiluz USA Outdoor Furnishings Winner F100 Flycycle “Often the problem with bike racks is that they are beautifully designed but aren’t very functional. It’s nice to see something so successful at meeting both criteria.” —Constantin Boym Honorable Mentions Paseo Planters OSSO Concrete Design Rambler Picnic Table Shift Editors’ Picks Circula Collection Blu Dot Stack mmcité1 Outdoor Finishes and Surfaces Winner Bison 30-inch-by-30-inch Ipe Wood Deck Tile Bison Innovative Products “Unlike other decking products available today, these plank squares snap into a sliding system, which makes installation easier and allows you to make different configurations.”—Gabrielle Golenda Honorable Mention Dekton Grip+ Cosentino Gradients Móz Designs Editors’ Picks Ombré Cement Tile Villa Lagoon Tile Variegated Zebra Honed “Limestone” Pure + FreeForm Openings Winner Attack Resistant Openings ASSA ABLOY Opening Solutions “This product is necessary given the current state of affairs. Innovation in safety is essential, and it’s really great to see companies using ingenuity to deal with this systemic issue. It’s a Band-Aid solution to an unfortunate problem in the United States.”—Lora Appleton Honorable Mentions The Mitica Collection Boffi Group - ADL Bird1st Glass Guardian Glass Editors’ Picks Lift and Slide WinDoor Steel Entry Pivot Doors MAIDEN Steel Facades Winner InVert Self-Shading Windows TBM Designs “This product reinforces weather conditions and makes you more aware of what’s outside. Rather than everything being completely controlled by humans, natural systems control the building, which is something we need to be dealing with more and more.”—Fiona Raby Honorable Mentions Living Wall Facades Eco Brooklyn Modified Wood Cladding Kebony Editors’ Picks Concrete Skin Breeze Rieder North America Perforated Building Facade Rigidized Metals Isopure Sedak Building Materials Winner Mass Plywood Panel Freres Lumber Co. “To see that there’s advancement in the acceptance of these new, innovative, wood materials is promising.”—Alda Ly Honorable Mentions Foamglas Owens Corning DELTA-DRY & LATH Dörken Systems Editors’ Picks Louvre Railing System Amuneal LP WeatherLogic Air & Water Barrier LP Building Solutions HVAC Winner EcoBlue WeatherMaster Rooftop Units Carrier “This product is simpler, more dependable, and lower maintenance than comparable options on the market today. Too often, design is perceived as something that has to be seen, but this is an invisible product that has a strong impact regardless.”—Constantin Boym Honorable Mentions EME3625DFLMD Ruskin XP Series Industrial HVLS Ceiling Fan Hunter Industrial Editors’ Picks MLZ One-Way Ceiling Cassette Mitsubishi Electric Trane HVAC US i6 Big Ass Fans Tech: Smart Products Winner Life Anew NEXT TOTO USA & Georgia Pacific Pro “Too often, intelligent design becomes an area for gimmicks, but in this case, there aren’t any. This product is a serious working system.”—Constantin Boym Honorable Mentions Intentek Wireless Charging Surface Formica Phyn Plus Smart Uponor North America Editors' Picks PureWarmth Kohler Storage System with Expandable Battery Pack LG Electronics Integrated Wine Column Signature Kitchen Suite Tech: Design Tools Winner ARCHICAD 23 GRAPHISOFT SE “It’s nice that this product allows architects to use Apple computers. It’s just more flexible.”—Alda Ly Honorable Mentions Layer Layer ColorReader Datacolor Editors' Picks OpenCA and ProIO IngeniousIO Origami XR Origami XR
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Coast to Coast

The HKIA brings Hong Kong architecture to L.A. in Island__Peninsula
An upcoming exhibition will bring together two vastly different cities on opposite sides of the same ocean. Organized by the Hong Kong Institute of Architects (HKIA), Island__Peninsula is a 14-day public exhibition which aims to compare the contrasting urban landscapes of both Los Angeles and its Chinese counterpart while illustrating what they believe to be a unique “Hong Kong style”.  Sixteen exhibits have bene organized under four themes that encompass the architecture of Hong Kong: glamor, efficiency, orderliness, and constant change. The exhibits will be displayed in the form of “islands”, a concept inspired by a 1975 novel, Island and Peninsula, by Liu Yichang which explores fragments of daily life in the Chinese city composed of 263 islands.  Accordingly, Island__Peninsula will offer a range of both built and conceptual work at various scales from individual homes, high-density towers, streetscapes, and community facilities. Works on view will include a theater emphasizing the traditional Chinese craft of bamboo scaffolding, speculations on transit-oriented developments, and how a university project adapts to the undulating hillside terrain of the city.  Under the “Land of Efficiency” theme, one exhibitor opened a dialogue between the two cities through a project called “Case Study Tower”. Employing the symbolism of Art & Architecture’s Case Study Houses, Chiu Ning and Lau Wai Kin multiplied and composed imagery and drawings of the homes to visualize a fictional tower typical of Hong Kong’s residences.  In concurrence with the exhibition, an interactive installation titled “Skyline Cello” will be on view at Hysan Place in Hong Kong. The artist, Keith Lam, “uses the skyline of Hong Kong and Los Angeles as musical score”, encouraging visitors to create their own "music of the city."  Island__Peninsula was co-curated by Chang Hoi Wood and So Kwok Kin and will run from September 19 through October 2 at the Westfield Oasis Space at Westfield Century City, Los Angeles.