Search results for "San Francisco"

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Building Ban

Weekend edition: Shigeru Ban and Heatherwick Studio under construction, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Repair plan for shuttered Transbay Transit Center is in the works The Metropolitan Transportation Commission approved a repair plan for the Transbay Transit Center that the Transbay Joint Powers Authority will consider. Shigeru Ban Architects burnishes its status as a leader in mass timber Known for experimenting with paper tubes and bamboo, Shigeru Ban Architects is burnishing its reputation in tall and mass timber. Preview Heatherwick Studio’s upcoming New York City projects Heatherwick Studio has three projects under construction within a 19-block span of Manhattan's West Side, and AN took the opportunity to check in. Seattle set to finally close Alaskan Way Viaduct and open new tunnel The two-mile Alaskan Way Viaduct, long been considered a major hazard to the city and its drivers, will close this Friday, January 11. United States withdraws from UNESCO (again) The United States has withdrawn from UNESCO in protest of the organization's recognition of cultural sites in the West Bank. That's all—see you next week!
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Steel Waiting For a Solution

Repair plan for shuttered Transbay Transit Center is in the works
Late last week, Transbay Joint Powers Authority officials in San Francisco approved plans to repair a pair of fractured beams that were discovered at the now-shuttered Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects–designed Transbay Transit Center last fall. The plan calls for the installation of four sets of new steel reinforcing plates to shore up the failing members, The San Francisco Examiner reported. The peer-reviewed repair plans were approved in late December by the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC), a transportation agency that works across the nine-county San Francisco Bay Area. MTC’s preliminary investigation concluded that the issues with the fissured beams were linked to the presence of welding access holes that had been cut into the beams to facilitate their installation. In all, four beams will be reinforced under the repair plan: the two fractured beams spanning over Fremont Street and a pair of corresponding but uncompromised beams located on the opposite side of the building. According to the report, the steel plates will be bolted together above and below the areas where the fractures occurred on each beam. A date for reopening the center has not been set, but authorities are at work on a construction schedule for the repairs. A further update to the plans will be presented to the board of the Transbay Joint Powers Authority later this week. The $2.2 billion transit center opened to much fanfare in August 2018 but closed just a few weeks after its debut because of the construction faults. The transit center spans three blocks and is capped by a 5.4-acre park designed by PLP Landscape Architects. Thornton Tomasetti is the design engineer for the project. The center has been closed for over 100 days and commuters have gone back to using a temporary bus depot that had been in operation during construction for their daily transportation needs.
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Get Your Shinto On

Burning Man’s 2019 temple gets back to basics
The central temple for Burning Man 2019 has been revealed, and architect Geordie Van Der Bosch has chosen to keep the building simple and linear. As opposed to last year’s digitally-fabricated, fractal-invoking Galaxia, 2019’s Temple of Direction references traditional Japanese torii gates and presents a clear entrance and exit. Burning Man takes place on the "playa" of Black Rock Desert in Nevada every August, and 70,000 attendees are expected to crowd into the temporary Black Rock City this year. The theme for 2019 is “Metamorphosis,” and the Temple of Direction is appropriately supposed to represent a journey for the viewer. The 180-foot-long, 37-foot-wide, 36-foot-tall temple specifically references the gates of the Fushimi Inari-taisha shrine in Kyoto, Japan. Visitors will pass through a narrow opening that gradually widens to a great hall in the center of the temple before they pass into an open-air gap and exit through the other end. The four entrances to the temple have also been aligned to the four cardinal directions, and the entire installation will be encircled by eye-shaped fencing.
According to the Burning Man Journal, “This linear form reflects the passage of life with its beginning, middle, and end. Throughout the structure, there are areas that reflect this journey: narrow & wide spaces, bright & dark spaces, and tunnels that create intimate physical settings. Meanwhile, a large central hall, an altar, and many shelves for offerings create the setting for our collective experience.” The San Francisco–based Van Der Bosch has lived in England and Japan previously (near the Fushimi Inari-taisha shrine his temple is based on). He’s also an avid Burning Man attendee, having been to seven previous festivals. Interested in helping realize the Temple of Direction? Festival organizers are currently looking for volunteers to help fabricate the temple in Oakland, California, and will begin fundraising to cover the construction costs soon. Of course, as is the Burning Man way, the entire temple will be set on fire and razed when the festival ends on September 2.
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2018 Winding Down

Weekend edition: Women in architecture aren’t hiding but face challenges in the field
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Stop asking where all the female architects are; we’re right here Madame Architect editor Julia Gamolina weighs in on the tired, problematic question: Where are all the female architects? Design legend Murray Moss discusses the future of “anti-disciplinarity” The design legend gave two lectures and graduate-level workshops this past semester at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). Architects rally behind Doriana Fuksas after prize snub This month two groups started a petition demanding that Doriana Fuksas be included in a lifetime achievement award given to her partner Massimiliano. San Francisco orders historic Neutra home be rebuilt after being torn down After an illegal demolition of one of the five remaining Richard Neutra–designed homes in San Francisco, the homeowner was ordered to build an exact replica. AN will be closed through Wednesday, December 26, but we will see you on Thursday!
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Breaking the Mold

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for New Materials
2018 Best of Design Award for New Materials: Cyclopean Cannibalism Designer: Matter Design Location: Seoul, South Korea

By translating an ancient method of masonry into a digital procedure, Matter Design developed Cyclopean Cannibalism as a sustainable alternative to the standard practice of landfilling demolition debris. This project illustrates how the carcasses of previous buildings could be reused as a new material. To do this, rubble is scanned and input into a digital algorithm that sorts random shapes. Each stonelike component is carved by a robotic arm and recomposed into a new construction. In today’s urban context, we generate unprecedented quantities of waste. In order to more intelligently reconsider existing building stock, the profession could learn from cyclopean construction. Can our future cities digest themselves?

Honorable Mentions Project Name: One Thousand Museum Designers: Zaha Hadid Architects and ODP Architects Location: Miami Project Name: Clastic Order Designer: T+E+A+M Location: San Francisco
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Are You Leddy For It?

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Adaptive Reuse
2018 Best of Design Award winner for Urban Design: San Francisco Art Institute at Fort Mason Designer: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects Location: San Francisco Located on the edge of San Francisco Bay, Fort Mason Pier 2 has been transformed from a historic army warehouse into a satellite campus for the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI). This adaptive reuse project preserves the industrial integrity of the landmark concrete-and-steel structure while supporting the school’s pedagogical goals. The iconic shed was restored with an integrated sustainable building system, working with the existing building structure and materials. A photovoltaic solar system was mounted on the building’s gabled roof. The design interweaves the historic and contemporary, preserving the dramatic, light-filled industrial structure to create 160 studios, workshops, flexible teaching spaces, public galleries, and a media theater. Honorable Mentions  Project Name: Empire Stores Designer: S9 Architecture Location: Brooklyn, New York Project Name: Cristo Rey St. Martin College Prep Designer: JGMA Location: Waukegan, Illinois
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Tearing Down the House

San Francisco orders historic Neutra home be rebuilt after being torn down
Preservationists in Twin Peaks, San Francisco, were aghast this past December when it came to light that much of a 1935 home designed by Richard Neutra had been illegally demolished months prior. Owner Ross Johnston had purchased the 1,300-square-foot 49 Hopkins Avenue—also known as the Largent House—for $1.7 million with plans to replace it with a 4,000-square-foot mega-mansion in 2017. Only the home’s garage door and frame still stand today, but on December 13, the City Planning Commission unanimously ruled that Johnston must build an exact replica of the house, as well as a plaque detailing the building’s history. The Largent House was one of only five buildings designed by Neutra in San Francisco. The two-story, whitewashed-concrete-block and redwood-timber building made ample use of glass bricks to let in natural light and included a greenhouse-like glass topper to enclose an indoor pool. The plague of illegal demolitions by San Franciscan homeowners hoping to build big or flip the property is widespread, and punitive repercussions are rare. The city is in the middle of a housing crisis, and when faced with the option of forbidding offenders from building on the demoed lot, the Planning Commission has let homeowners off the hook. Not this time. Johnson applied for a demolition permit and permission to build his new house two months after the home was razed, arguing that a fire in 1968 and remodels throughout the 1980s and ’90s had removed the home’s architectural significance. Rather than flipping the plot of land, Johnson claims that he was only building something that could accommodate his six-person family and that the demo was undertaken for safety and quality of life reasons. The Planning Commission disagreed, and in a 5-0 vote, ordered Johnson to rebuild the Largent House. Planning Commissioner Dennis Richards hopes that the move, along with the recently proposed Housing Preservation and Expansion Reform Act, which harshly penalizes illegal demolitions, would help curb speculation in the housing market. “The fact that it was a unanimous vote should send a message to everyone that is playing fast and loose that the game is over,” Peskin told the San Francisco Chronicle. “We want to preserve iconic, historic structures, but even more important, we want to protect our reservoir of more affordable housing stock. You want a 1,300-square-foot house to be worth what a 1,300-square-foot house is worth, rather than a mega-mansion.” Unfortunately, this isn’t a shocking story in 2018, as a number of architecturally significant homes, including a Venturi Scott Brown–designed house in Pittsburgh, faced under-the-radar demolitions and renovations.
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CMY-Play

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Young Architects
2018 Best of Design Awards winner for Young Architects: Runaway Designer: SPORTS Location: Santa Barbara, California Runaway is a mobile pop-up pavilion first developed by SPORTS for the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara. With the goal of bringing art to underrepresented neighborhoods, three self-similar, open-structure objects were designed to reference the foggy and hazy climate of California’s coastal region. The collection’s orientation and composition is intended to be rearranged at different sites. In each deployment, the project generates public space and arts programming for underserved communities. Runaway illustrates the potential for small architectural objects to add a robust and ephemeral layer to urban centers—one that repositions the city as a series of small episodic moments rather than grand architectural interventions. Honorable Mentions Project name: Noodle Soup Designer: office ca Location: Lake Forest, Illinois Project name: Malleable Monuments Designer: The Open Workshop Location: San Francisco
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More Than Skin Deep

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Interior — Healthcare
2018 Best of Design Award for Interior — Healthcare: NYDG Integral Health & Wellness Designer: Brandon Haw Architecture Location: New York Situated in Manhattan’s Ladies’ Mile historic district, the NYDG Integral Health & Wellness is the new, 7,000-square-foot flagship facility for the New York Dermatology Group. Eight blood work and nutrition treatment rooms, two cryotherapy suites, and a shop are integrated within a single loft space. Brandon Haw Architecture developed the interior project as a space within a space. A central, freestanding enclosure—clad in wave-pattern fiberglass panels—contains all facilities while making room for a perimeter walkway, allowing patients and staff to circulate alongside magnificent, light-filled windows. Treatment-room walls were custom-built in Italy using yacht hull technology. Small details like bronze trims, door pulls, and cabinetry were introduced to complement dark reclaimed wood block floors. Honorable Mention Project Name: Studio Dental II Designer: Montalba Architects Location: San Francisco
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Flat Living

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Interior — Residential
2018 Best of Design Award for Interior — Residential: 15th St Designer: Mork Ulnes Architects Location: San Francisco

By converting an uninhabitable attic into a unified and light-filled volume, Mork Ulnes Architects gave new life to a 1907 Victorian flat. The formerly compartmentalized house was transformed into an expansive home centered on collective living. To host a growing family, the gabled attic level was lightly divided into bedrooms, thanks to a series of partial-height walls. A double-height stair atrium cuts into the center of the building, linking the newly habitable attic to the levels below. The attic’s wood framework is a graphic echo of the original roofline within the expanded building shell. This framework language carries throughout the project in casework details, windows, guardrails, and the kitchen.

Honorable Mentions Project Name: Fort Green Place Designer: Matter of Architecture Location: Brooklyn, New York Project Name: Little House. Big City. Designer: Office of Architecture Location: Brooklyn, New York
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Hole-ier Than Thou

Possible source of failure discovered for San Francisco’s Transbay Center
Nearly three months after a pair of cracked steel beams were discovered at the Pelli Clarke Pelli–designed Transbay Transit Center in San Francisco, crews investigating the structural failures have begun to piece together what might have gone awry. According to recent investigations, the beams in question were not only fabricated with imperfections that rendered the steel more brittle and weaker than specified, but they were also altered by the fabricators before they were installed in a way that differed from the shop drawing designs that had been initially approved for the project, The Mercury News reported. The changes include the addition of so-called “weld access” or “weld termination” holes along the web of each joist to make installation easier. While it is still unknown exactly which type of openings were made in the beams—there are key design differences between the two types of holes—the resulting change is thought to have created an imbalance in how the loads from the building above were delivered down to the transit center’s foundations. As the center came under regular use, the buses and crowds that occupied its upper levels put enormous strain on the compromised beams, resulting in the debilitating fissures. The Mercury News reported that Stockon, California–based Herrick Corporation, the company responsible for fabricating the steel beams in question, prefers to refer to the openings as “weld termination” holes because those openings are less strictly regulated than “weld access” holes, which have more stringent design and finishing requirements. Design engineers Thornton Tomasetti have not provided comment regarding the nature of the openings in question. Robert Hazleton, president of Herrick Corporation told The Mercury News, “It may sound like a small thing, but it does change how you finish the inside of the hole,” adding, “There are less specific requirements for a weld termination hole.” The stresses resulting from the new openings compounded the inadequacies of the steel members, according to the report, which also highlighted a lack of specificity regarding these types of failures in San Francisco’s building codes as a key oversight in the building’s design. Potential fixes for the beams include welding supplemental steel plates to each member to improve their rigidity, though the Transbay Joint Powers Authority, the public agency tasked with building and maintaining the terminal, will not have a specific plan for repairs or an estimated date for reopening the $2.2 billion complex until January 2019. Until a final cause and remedy are found, San Francisco commuters will continue to use the temporary bus terminal created during construction of the Transbay Center for their transportation needs.
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Building Wall and Building Wall Quickly

Weekend edition: Amazon gets grilled, Brutalism gets preserved, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Stunning new photos document I.M. Pei’s early brutalist museum I.M. Pei's first museum design, The Everson Museum of Art, is a big, brutalist structure that's celebrating its 50th birthday in Syracuse, New York. Chicago aims to preserve the vernacular architecture in its largest Mexican-American community The Commission on Chicago Landmarks has approved a preliminary designation for a dense array of vernacular buildings in the heart of Pilsen. Against all odds, progressive land-use reforms are taking root in American cities With Minneapolis, San Francisco, and Los Angeles moving forward with land-use reforms, the thinking behind how American cities work could soon change. DHS says it is “building wall and building wall quickly” in bizarre statement In an odd press release, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security touts quick construction of the U.S.-Mexico border wall key sections. New York’s proposal for Amazon’s HQ2 is much worse than we thought The concessions from the city have raised eyebrows and triggered a trio of City Council hearings on the terms of the deal.