Search results for "Agence Ter"

Editorial>A status quo to believe in?

In this issue, we cover a landscape of in-between spaces: divergent urban uses of public realm via Los Angeles’s Great Streets initiative, thoughtfully considered multifamily development in Santa Monica, a fresh batch of transit options in L.A., and a blending of private and public space in Seattle. If this seems like a jumbled mess, that’s because this collection of stories reflects the increasingly contested nature of West Coast urbanism. When considering the region’s pervasive homelessness crisis, increasing unaffordability, and legislative squabbles over development, we see a condition that is rooted at the nexus of two things: where we live and how we get there.

But really, this is old news. The tension between density and mobility has been a driving force in the West’s development since the colonial era, when conquistadors established El Camino Real and set up camps one day’s horse ride apart.

In today’s quest to make the West’s cities more livable, sustainable, and equitable, an effort is underway to give various modes of transportation—walking, cycling, light rail, and ridesharing—equal priority, meaning that single-occupant cars are watching their day in the sun fading in the rearview. If one argument is gaining traction, with large transit expansions planned in Los Angeles, San Francisco, and Seattle over the coming years, it’s a common sense one: that pedestrianized forms of mobility simply make for better cities. Where there is less of a reliance on cars and the space they require, people can live in smaller homes, coexist closer together, talk to one another more often, and have the time to enjoy their neighborhoods.

But only, of course, if they can afford to live in these areas in the first place. Because, simultaneously, the West is enduring a widespread shortage of rental and private homes resulting from decades of gradual downzoning and anti-density legislation that have left the region massively under-built. And whereas Los Angeles was once capable of housing 10 million people under the city’s 1960 zoning regulations, today, it can only accommodate about four million inhabitants and has been built out according to what is currently allowed. The reality is that hundreds of thousands of housing units are needed across the region to meet today’s needs, and the few talented designers who are stepping in to provide thoughtful, equitable distribution and design of those units are hampered by legislation, restrictive ordinances, or threats of litigation. Changes in zoning created this problem, and changes in zoning can help will solve it.

And when planning departments do not step in or act too slowly, state governments will act on their behalf. California’s AB1866, for example, set a new, relatively liberal statewide standard for the implementation of Accessory Dwelling Units, the small, sometimes-detached efficiency suites on otherwise single-family properties that are quietly up-zoning even the wealthiest of neighborhoods. These so-called “in-law” units, already common in working-class areas, help populations grow up and age in place, provide a landing pad for recent immigrants, and allow homeowners to earn rental income through their properties. Though this is a stop-gap solution, it is, at least, a developing front and a site of overall disruption.

Community-oriented designers can also subvert the rules. But too often, community-oriented design is impermanent or doesn’t operate at a scale widespread enough to create lasting change. There is an under-addressed middle market that designers and developers have been too hesitant to embrace. The terminus of the new Expo and the adjacent Tongva Park designed by James Corner Field Operations in Santa Monica, however, are powerfully permanent statements. Though Tongva Park opened almost two years ago, the completion of the Expo terminus and its associated intersection make for a metaphoric moment: a pedestrianized street connecting public transit to a pier over the ocean. This design, bookended by the recently selected minimalist Agence Ter and SALT-designed proposal for PershingSquare in Downtown Los Angeles, creates an east-west urban route, while Gehry Partners’ ongoing community engagement surrounding its working designs for the Los Angeles River has the potential to create an ecologically significant north-south spine.

In this election season, let’s call this slow-burning revolution the Clinton option for urbanism: ignoring calls for barbarism and perfecting the status quo to be, if nothing else, better and available to many more. Right now, that’s the best West Coast cities can hope for, and maybe it’s not so bad.

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Museum of the 20th Century

Star-studded list of international architects compete for new Berlin museum
A total of 42 firms have been selected in the most recent round of a design competition for the Museum of the 20th Century. The museum will be located in the heart of the Berlin Cultural Forum. New York practices SO-IL, Snøhetta and REX are on the list, along with British firms Zaha Hadid Architects and David Chipperfield Architects. Back in November 2014, Germany’s parliament put aside 200 million euros for the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation and a new, much-needed building to show 20th century art at the Cultural Forum. In September 2015, a competition was launched for a design strategy that would include the site layout, architecture, and landscaping of the museum. The new building is set to display "internationally significant art collections" including the National Gallery's Marx and Pietzsch collections, parts of the Marzona collection, and works from the Kupferstichkabinett (Museum of Prints and Drawings). Now whittled down to a pool of 42, of which 13 were invited agencies, the selected firms will submit more detailed proposals mid-September of this year. A jury is due to meet the following month to decide where to go from there. Culture Minister Monika Grütters explained: "The great interest [in] the project shows that it is an attractive challenge for any renowned agency to build in this neighborhood. We expect exciting and bold designs [that] dare the restructuring of the Cultural Forum, without challenging the existing ensemble," which includes the nearby Mies van der Rohe-designed Neue Nationalgalerie. President of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation Hermann Parzinger said: "It must be possible to combine outstanding architectural and urban design with the requirements of a museum in the 21st century. I want a building that sets a new mark at this location, but it brings the necessary openness." The finalists include the following offices:
  • 3XN Architects, Copenhagen, Denmark with Henrik Jorgenson Landskab, Copenhagen, Denmark
  • Aires Mateus e Associados, Lisbon, Portugal with PROAP Lda, Lisbon
  • Beatriz Elena Alés + Zaera, Castelló, Spain
  • Arga16, Berlin, Germany with Anne Wex Berlin, Germany
  • Barkow Leibinger GmbH, Berlin, Germany with Professor Gabriele Kiefer, Berlin, Germany
  • BAROZZI / VEIGA GmbH, Barcelona, Spain with antón & Ghiggi landschaftsarchitektur GmbH, Zurich, Switzerland
  • Behnisch Architekten, Stuttgart, Germany
  • Bruno Fioretti Marquez Architekten, Berlin, Germany with Capatti staubach Landscape Architects, Berlin, Germany
  • David Chipperfield Architects, Berlin, Germany with Wirtz International NV, Schoten
  • CHOE Hackh / CUTE ARCHITECTS, Frankfurt am Main, Germany with Park Design, Kejoo Park, Seoul, South Korea
  • Christ & Gantenbein Architects, Basel, Switzerland with Fontana Landschaftsarchitektur GmbH, Basel
  • Cukrowicz nachbaur ARCHITEKTEN ZT GMBH, Bregenz, Austria with Studio Volcano, Landschaftsarchitektur GmbH, Zurich
  • Pedro Domingos arquitectos unip. Ida + Pedro Matos Gameiro arquitecto Ida Lisbon, Portugal with Baldios arquitectos paisagistas, Ida Lisbon, Portugal
  • Dost architecture Schaffhausen, Switzerland with Boesch landscape architecture Schaffhausen, Switzerland
  • Max Dudler architect, Berlin, Germany with Planorama Landscape Architecture, Berlin
  • Sou Fujimoto Architects, Tokyo, Japan with Latz + Partner, Kranzberg, Germany
  • Gmp International GmbH, Berlin, Germany
  • Grüntuch Ernst planning GmbH, Berlin, Germany with Sinai Society of Landscape Architects mbH, Berlin, Germany
  • Zaha Hadid Limited (Zaha Hadid Architects), London, United Kingdom with GREAT.MAX. Ltd., Edinburgh, United Kingdom
  • HASCHER JEHLE architecture, design and consulting Hascher Jehle GmbH, Berlin, Germany with Weidinger Landschaftsarchitekten, Berlin, Germany
  • Heinle, Wischer und Partner, Freie Architekten Berlin, Germany with Prof. Heinz W. Hallmann Landscape Architect Aachen, Germany
  • Herzog & De Meuron, Basel, Switzerland with Vogt Landscape architects, Zurich / Berlin
  • Florian Hoogen Architect BDA Mönchengladbach, Germany with hermanns landscape architecture / environmental planning Schwalmtal, Germany
  • Lacaton & VASSAL ARCHITECTS, Paris, France with CYRILLE MARLIN, Pau, France
  • Lundgaard & Tranberg Arkitekter A / S, Copenhagen, Denmark with SCHØNHERR A / S, Copenhagen
  • Mangado Y ASOCIADOS SL, Pamplona, Spain with TOWNSHEND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS LIMITED, London, United Kingdom
  • Josep Lluis Mateo - MAP Arquitectos, Barcelona, Spain with D'ici là paysages & territoires, Paris, France
  • Office for Metropolitan Architecture (OMA); Rotterdam, Netherlands with Inside Outside, Amsterdam
  • Dominique Perrault Architecture, Paris, France with Agence Louis Benech, Paris, France
  • REX Architecture PC, New York, USA with Marti-Baron + Miething, Paris, France
  • Sauerbruch Hutton Architects, Berlin, Germany with Gustafson Porter, London
  • Schulz and Schulz Architekten GmbH, Leipzig, Petra and Paul Kahlfeldt Architekten, Berlin with POLA Landscape Architects, Berlin, Germany
  • Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA, Tokyo, Japan with Bureau Bas Smets, Brussels, Belgium
  • Shenzhen Huahui Design Co., Ltd. Nanshan (Shenzhen), China with Beijing Chuangyi Best Landscape Design Co. Ltd. Beijing, China
  • Snøhetta architects, Oslo, Norway
  • SO - IL Ltd, New York, USA with Stoss Landscape Urbanism, Boston, USA
  • Staab Architekten GmbH, Berlin, Germany with Levin Monsigny, Berlin
  • TOPOTEK 1, Berlin, Germany and Pordenone, Italy with TOPOTEK 1 Berlin, Germany
  • Emilio Tuñón Arquitectos, Madrid, Spain, Tunon & Ruckstuhl GmbH Architects SIA, Rüschlikon, Switzerland with Benavides Laperche, Madrid, Spain
  • UNStudio, Amsterdam, Netherlands, Wenzel + Wenzel Freie Architekten, Berlin, Germany with Ramboll Studio Dreiseitl GmbH, Ueberlingen, Germany
  • ARGE Weyell Zipse architect / architect horns Basel, Switzerland with James Melsom landscape architect BSLA, Basel, Switzerland
  • Riken Yamamoto & Field Shop Co., Ltd., Yokohama, Japan, Holzer Kobler Architects Berlin GmbH, Berlin, Germany, Holzer Kobler Architects GmbH, Zurich,
  • Switzerland with vetschpartner Landschaftsarchitekten AG, Zurich, Switzerland
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Cool Off

Mia Lehrer selected to design L.A.’s FaB Park
The team led by Mia Lehrer and Associates (MLA), in partnership with Office of Metropolitan Architecture (OMA) and design innovation firm IDEO, was selected by the City of Los Angeles this morning to design the new $12 million public park located at the intersection of First and Broadway in Downtown Los Angeles. MLA’s proposal for the so-called FaB Park utilizes a mix of meadows, gardens, and terraces packed with native plantings and mature oak trees to create a shady “California oaklands” landscape that can handle and capture all on-site stormwater for treatment and infiltration. The design also features a large, split-level structure with amphitheater seating designed by OMA that will be programmed by IDEO with public events focusing on food and entertainment. The structure injects a sizable commercial element into the scheme and features and associated beer garden and test kitchen. Towering, leaf-shaped shade structures dot the central plaza adjacent to the restaurant and amphitheater and aim to distribute shade across the unplanted portions of the scheme. The plaza will be accessed from a variety of approaches connecting to surrounding sidewalks, each of which frames one of the scheme’s signature gardens. A paseo will runs across the site from the corner of First and Broadway to Spring Street and City Hall and cuts through the plaza. The park aims to not only create place of respite in one of downtown’s most symbolic sites, but also to connect foot traffic between the Rios, Clementi, Hale Studios-designed Grand Park adjacent to FaB Park, City Hall, and the Los Angeles Times headquarters, and new SOM-designed United States Courthouse across the street. FaB Park is the second major park-related development in the neighborhood, with the Agence Ter and SALT-designed, minimalist proposal for the blighted Pershing Square sitting just four blocks away released just a few weeks ago.
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Pershing Square-Off

Agence Ter selected to redesign L.A.’s Pershing Square
Agence Ter was selected this morning as the winners of the competition aimed at redesigning Downtown Los Angeles’s central, 5-acre park, Pershing Square. The firm’s proposal for the city’s most historic open space aims to “get rid of trendy design approaches” that have plagued the park’s prior redesigns and to provide, as Agence Ter partner Henri Bava declared at the announcement ceremony, a “timeless design able to change with the neighborhood.” The French landscape firm’s approach is notable for the “town square” approach taken to the site, where a large canopy located at the western edge of the park will house cafés and other amenities that open onto a grassy knoll at the center of the park. Agence Ter’s proposal beat out entries by James Corner Field Operations with Fredrick Fischer and Partners, SWA and Morphosis, and wHY and Civitas. Bava announced that the agency would open a Los Angeles office to oversee the design and construction of the park. Downtown Los Angeles councilperson Jose Huizar, surrounded by a cohort of joyful politicos and city boosters, announced the winning entry in a heavily-attended morning ceremony in the downtrodden park. Councilperson Huizar told the crowd, “Of all the designs presented, [Agence Ter’s proposal] won us over, and more importantly, won over the public. We are very confident in the selection and final decision.” The four finalists were selected in December 2015 from an original pool of ten groups that presented work to Pershing Square Renew, a nonprofit partnership between Huizar and business leaders, residents, and activists administering the redesign. Those four teams presented final schemes to the public in late April. In the three weeks since, politicians, business people, and residents have provided input via public and online forums made available for comment. Agence Ter’s proposal was selected at the conclusion of this semi-public vetting process. The city’s oldest park, Pershing Square has lived through many iterations and names throughout its 150 plus year history. The winning proposal will be the third such iteration for the square in the last 100 years. The most recent version of the park was designed in 1994 Mexican Modernist architect Ricardo Legorreta. Laurie Olin was the landscape architect while Barbara McCarren designed the site’s hardscaping. A disciple of Luis Barragán, Legorreta’s scheme for the park takes a coy approach to the plaza mayor concept by using brightly-painted platonic stucco masses to frame and divide the area programmatically. These spaces include a purple campanile, small café area, seating integrated with expanses of lawn, and a large fountain surrounded by sculptural orbs. The park sits above a city-owned, five-story parking complex and has been generally unloved by the public because of it’s lack of porosity and the physical impediments resulting from the garage’s many access ramps. The rapid fire progress seen on the redevelopment of the park, a process that began only in 2013, has mirrored the transformation of the area from run-down business district to affluent enclave. A Ralphs supermarket opened in the area in 2007, the first in over 50 years. That market catalyzed a residential boom in the area and since then, Ace and Standard hotel locations have come on line, bringing with them a slew of high-end culinary and retail establishments, including a 42,000 square foot Whole Foods location that opened in November of 2015. The winning scheme, if built and ultimately successful, would cement Downtown L.A.’s status as one of the city’s distinct and vital neighborhoods. As of this morning’s announcement, however, no budget for the redevelopment has been released and a timeline for the construction of the project is still to be decided. Councilperson Huizar expressed hope that the park would be open by 2019, he and other City officials and residents are joined in their hope that this version of the park will be the one that finally sticks. Hopefully Agence Ter’s scheme won’t be wiped away twenty years from now like Legorreta’s.
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Pershing Square-Off

Here’s a First Look at the Finalists Vying to Redesign Downtown LA’s Pershing Square
Here’s the first look at the four final designs by Agence Ter and team, James Corner Field Operations with Fredrick Fischer and Partners, SWA and Morphosis, and wHY and Civitas for LA’s Pershing Square. Angelenos are being invited to comment on the finalists’ proposals over the next few weeks as Pershing Square Renew, a collection of designers, business leaders, and officials civic leaders, seeks to redevelop the centrally-located, five-acre square at the heart of Downtown LA. The teams of finalists hail from an original pool of ten groups that presented work to the nonprofit in October of 2015. That grouping was reduced to four teams in December, with those finalists' final submissions are now vying for the final selection, to be announced in May. The proposals are shown below and will be formally presented to the public at the Palace Theatre in Downtown Los Angeles on April 28th at a sold out event. See Pershing Square Renew’s website for updates on further public viewings.
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Four finalists selected to redesign Pershing Square in Los Angeles
Pershing Square Renew just announced the four finalists of the Pershing Square design competition: SWA with Morphosis, James Corner Field Operations with Frederick Fisher & Partners, Agence TER with SALT Landscape Architects, and wHY with Civitas. These teams will now develop fully fleshed out proposals for the five-acre park in Downtown Los Angeles. The finalist concept boards offer clues as to what to expect from the final proposals: SWA and Morphosis identified four strategies for their reorganized park: ecology (native trees and a drought-friendly water feature), mobility (a road diet along Olive Street and better Metro connections), programing (a market and a day/night event venue), and sustainable business (reworked parked concession, food vendor, and retail spaces.) James Corner Field Operations with Frederick Fisher & Partners held off at hinting at a design. Their concept boards show increased porosity between the park and the both the surrounding neighborhood as well as the cultural life of all of downtown and the Arts District. Expect the design to engage both in the park and along the adjacent streets and sidewalks. Agence TER with SALT Landscape Architects’ boards depict a boldy understated proposal. They envision Pershing Square as a giant lawn with several atmospheric gardens: a foggy garden, a scent garden, a dry garden, a wind garden, and an edible garden. Services are discretely tucked under a large shade canopy. wHY with Civitas landscape architecture group’s concept boards was also slim on design details. Although the proposal echoed some ideas seen in other team proposals, such as connections to the surrounding neighborhood, an emphasis on natural ecology, and food/market vendors, it uniquely suggested that the park offer education programming as well as something that could be digital connectivity entitled “Syncing Urban Hardware and Software.” The four finalists will develop their proposals over the first quarter of 2016, leading to another round of jury interviews and a public presentation in March. It’s unclear how and when the design will be built, since at moment the only funding for the project seems to be the $2 million pledged to by the Department of Recreation and Parks and MacFarlane Partners, who each chipped in one million. The Pershing Square Renew jury is: Janet Marie Smith (Jury Chair) SVP, Planning and Development, Los Angeles Dodgers José Huizar, Councilmember, 14th District, City of Los Angeles Donna Bojarsky, Founder and President, Future of Cities: Leading in LA Simon Ha, Downtown Los Angeles Neighborhood Council and Downtown LA Resident Mary McCue, Founder, MJM Management Group Rick Poulos, Principal, NBBJ Janet Rosenberg, Founding Principal, Janet Rosenberg & Studio Michael Shull, General Manager, Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks Michael Woo, Dean, Cal Poly Pomona, School of Environmental Design
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Pershing Square Renew wants your input on Semi-Finalist Concept Boards
In October, Pershing Square Renew selected 10 teams as semi-finalists for the redesign of Downtown Los Angeles’ oft-maligned urban space. The international design competition drew hundreds of entries and the two-handfuls selected represent both local and global practices. Reviewing the initial presentation boards, there’s common interest in opening up Pershing Square to the surrounding urban blocks, a porosity currently lacking in Legoretta’s scheme. The teams’ approaches are split between active and passive landscapes with some concepts showing large lawns and water features meant for calm reflection and light recreation, others packed the square with programming: dog parks, cafes, yoga zones, performance venues, etc. Pershing Square Renew posed the concept boards on their website and are now asking the Los Angeles community to weigh in with comments for the jury. Soon, the organization will select four top teams out of the field of semi-finalists and have them each develop a more comprehensive final design. Until then, have a gander at the boards below.
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Semi-finalists Announced for Pershing Square Competition
A shortlist was announced for the Pershing Square Renew competition. Ten teams were selected to have a chance at a crack at redoing Ricardo Legorreta's scheme. The five-acre park is seen as the centerpiece of a revitalized Downtown Los Angeles and the competition, a public-private partnership backed by councilmember José Huizar, is a critical step toward that effort. The ten semi-finalists are global, national, and local—and often in combination. They include: Paris-based Agence Ter with SALT Landscape ArchitectsSnohetta, James Corner Field Operations and Frederick Fisher and Partners, New York-based W Architecture, San Francisco-based PWP Landscape Architecture with Allied Works Architecture, Mia Lehrer Associates with NYC’s !Melk, Peterson Studio + BNIM, Rios Clementi Hale with OMA, SWA with Morphosis, and wHY Architecture These teams will continue to develop designs, which will be reviewed later this fall and a group of four finalists will be announced in December. Pershing Square Renew will select a winner in February 2016. On bets as to who might emerge from the pack, it seems that the organization is looking for details over gesture. “Their challenge isn’t to win awards; it’s to win over hearts,” said executive director Eduardo Santana. “More than anything else, these groups need to focus on the experiences their design will inspire and the memories the Square will create.”
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AIANY Honors 2012 Design Award Winners: Unbuilt Work
[Editor's Note: This the third in a four-part series documenting the winners of the AIANY's 2012 Design Awards, which are broken down into four categories: architecture, interiorsunbuilt work, and urban design. This list covers awards for unbuilt work.] The AIANY has released its annual list of Design Awards noting projects that demonstrate exemplary originality and quality, and the category covering unbuilt work tends to be among the most creative. This year's Honor and Merit Award winners for unbuilt work were selected by a jury consisting of Scott Erdy of Erdy McHenry Architecture, Thomas Hacker of THA, and Bruce Lindsey, dean of the College of Architecture at Washington University. Three unbuilt projects were distinguished with the top Honor Award including the Hirshhorn Museum Seasonal Inflatable Pavilion by Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Kling Stubbins, Dortoir Familial by NADAAA, Bidard & Raissi, and Agence François Vieillecroze, and the USAFA/Center for Character & Leadership Development by Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. Winning work in all four categories will be on display ay the Center for Architecture at 536 LaGuardia Place beginning April 19 through May 31.

Un-Built Work Honor Award Winners:

Hirshhorn Museum Seasonal Inflatable Pavilion, Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Kling Stubbins Washington, DC Dortoir Familial, NADAAA, Bidard & Raissi, and Agence François Vieillecroze Ramatuelle, France USAFA/Center for Character & Leadership Development, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Colorado Springs, CO

Un-Built Work Merit Award Winners:

West 57th, SLCE with BIG Bjarke Ingels Group New York, NY Brooklyn Detention Center, 1100 Architect and RicciGreene Associates Brooklyn, NY Magok Waterfront : INTER-CITY, UnitedLAB Seoul, South Korea Sabah Al-Salem University College of Education, Perkins+Will Shadadiyah, Kuwait University City, Kuwait The House on Chicken Feet: Fairy Tale Architecture, Bernheimer Architecture and LevenBetts with Guy Nordenson Associates Various Center for Architecture Science and Ecology, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill in collaboration with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute New York, NY Click on a thumbnail to launch the slideshow. All photos courtesy respective firms unless noted otherwise.
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Redesigning Chicago’s Navy Pier: And Then There Were 11
The 52 two teams competing to redesign Chicago's Navy pier have been narrowed down to 11. Lots of heavy hitters made the cut, including teams headed by BIG, Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas/Studio Gang, James Corner Field Operations. Many of Chicago's leading firms are represented on the teams. 1. AAECOM, BIG, Lead Pencil Studio, Project Projects, Speirs + Major, WET Design, Davis Langdon, Christy Webber, Tivoli International 2. Aedas Architects, Martha Schwartz Partners, Halcrow Yolles, Solomon Cordwell Buenz, Marshall Brown Projects, Pentagram, Fisher Marantz Stone, Suzanne Randolph Fine Arts 3. Frederic Schwartz Architects, Alejandro Zaera-Polo Architects, Thomas Balsley Associates, Arup, Atelier Ten, Pentagram, Fisher Marantz Stone, Nancy Rosen 4. Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Magnusson Klemencic Associates, Pentagram, Tillotson Design Associates 5. Jacques Ferrier Architectures, Sensual City Studio, Tim Brown Architects, Agence Ter, Integral Ruedi Baur, Chris Rockey, Dear Production 6. James Corner Field Operations, Terry Guen Design Associates, nArchitects, Bruce Mau Design, Leo Villareal, L'Observatoire International, Ed Marszewski, Fluidity Design Consultants, Patrick Blanc, John Greenlee & Associates, Chris Wangro, Billings Jackson, Buro Happold, Primera, HR&A Advisors, ETM Associates 7. !melk, HOK, UrbanLab, Terry Guen Design Associates, Thirst, Zoe Ryan, Conservation Design Forum, HR&A Advisors, Magnusson Klemencic Associates, Sam Schwartz Engineering, Leni Schwendinger LIGHT projects, CMS Fountain Consultants, Karin Bacon Enterprises 8. OMA/SGA (Studio Gang Architects), SCAPE, Thirst, Tillotson Design Associates, Arup, dbHMS, Fluidity Design Consultants, Patti Gilford Fine Arts, Robert Kirschner, Davis Langdon, KLOA 9. SHoP Architects, Brininstool, Kerwin and Lynch, Coen + Partners, GCAM Group, Mark Robbins, Pentagram, L'Observatoire International, Acoustic Dimensions, Arup 10. Xavier Vendrell Studio, Grimshaw Architects, Harley Ellis Devereaux, Arup, Studio Lab, Schuler Shook, Iñigo Manglano-Ovalle, Sarah Herda 11. Zaha Hadid Architects, tvsdesign, Balmori Associates, Halvorson and Partners, Space Agency, Seam
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Every Designer on the Planet Wants to Redesign Chicago’s Navy Pier
There's a certain dorky pleasure in the reading lists of teams vying for design competitions. The big names paired with the dependable locals. The firms with very busy dance cards that everyone seems to want. The odd random people with no discernible reason to be involved. The 52 teams that responded to the Navy Pier RFQ have all those in spades. Zaha! Foster + Partners, BIG, OMA! Every prominent Chicago architect! Hoerr Schaupt Landscape Architects on no less than four teams! We'll be watching to see who makes the next round. Amusement aside, it's great to see so many prominent local and international designers vying to improve the iconic pier. 1. AECOM, BIG, Lead Pencil Studio, Project Projects, Speirs + Major, WET Design, Davis Langdon, Christy Webber 2. Aedas Architects, Martha Schwartz Partners, Halcrow Yolles 3. All Design, Halcrow Yolles, Janet Rosenberg + Associates 4. Behnisch Architekten, Urban Strategies, Urban Works, Mia Lehrer + Associates, Arup 5. Booth Hansen, Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects, Terry Guen Design Associates,Arup, Tillett Lighting Design, Bruce Mau Design 6, Cooper Carry, SWA Group, Janet Rosenberg + Associates, Terry Guen Design Associates, MIG, Light Projects, Fluidity Design Consultants, Selbert Perkins Design, Arup, Chicago Public Art Group 7. D+K Architects, Theaster Gates, Schuler Shook, Daniel Weinbach & Partners, Larson Engineering, Tylk Gustafson Reckers Wilson Andrews 8. Design Workshop,Pickard Chilton, Patrick B Quigley Associates, JSC Art Consulting, Selbert Perkins Design, CMS Collaborataive, AES, RWDI, Live.Work.Learn.Play, Altus Works, Nelson Nygaard, MGPG Events, Primera 9. EC Purdy and Associates, Milhouse Engineering, Hitchcock Design Group, Vistara, GSG, Nayar Nayar, Land Surveying Services, Gjean Guarino 10. Epstein, Foster + Partners, Site Design Group, Schuler Shook, Catt Lyon Design 11. Frederic Schwartz Architects, Alejandro Zaera-Polo Architects, Thomas Balsley Associates, Arup, Atelier Ten, Pentagram, Fisher Marantz Stone, Nancy Rosen Inc. 12. Gustafson Guthrie Nichol, Diller Scofidio + Renfro, Magnusson Klemencic Associates, Pentagram, Tillotson Design Associates 13. Habitat 14. ingenhoven architects, Goettsch partners,Werner Sobek, Magnusson Klemencic Associates, Topotek 1, Liskae Associates, Jack Rouse, Office for Visual Interaction, Barbara Flynn 15. Jacques Ferrier Architectures, Sensual City Studio, Agenceter, Integral Ruedi Baur, Chris Rockey, Dear Production 16. James Corner Field Operations, nArchitects, Leo Villareal, Bruce Mau Design, L’Observatoire International, Fluidity Design Consultants, Patrick Marszewski, Buro Happold, Primera, HR&A Advisors, ETM Associates 17. John Ronan Architects, Janet Rosenberg + Associates, Arup, Thirst, Derek Porter Studio, CLUAA, Sharma Art Advisory 18. Kengo Kuma and Associates, StudioGC, Pivot Design, Anne Kustner Lighting Design, Terra Engineering, Primera 19. Krueck + Sexton Architect, Brooks+Scarpa, Uhlir Consulting, Charles Anderson Atelier, Terry Guen Design Associates, Fluidity Design Consultants, James Rondeau, Fisher Marantz Stone, Thornton Tomasetti, Pentagram 20. Landworks Studio, NADAAA, Arup, Urban Art Projects, 50,000 feet, L’Observatoire International 21. Lohan Anderson, PWP Landscape Architecture, Civitas, LAM Partners,Catt Lyon Design, Halvorson and Partners, Terra Engineering 22. Machado and Silvetti Associates, Grant Associates, Solomon Cordwell Buenz (SCB), Terry Guen Design Associates, Buro Happold, Thomas.matthews, Jason Bruges Studio 23. marquardt + GRIDWERK ARCHITECTURE, Conservation Design Forum, Urban Works 24. !melk, HOK, UrbanLab, Terry Guen Design Associates, Zoe Ryan, Thirst, Conservation Design Forum, HR&A Advisors, Magnusson Klemencic Associates, Sam Schwatz Engineering, Leni Schwendinger LIGHT projects, CMS Collaborataive, Karin Bacon Enterprises 25. Metropolitan Workshop, Buro Happold, Townshend Landscape Architects, Squint/Opera, Speirs + Major, Modus Operandi, HR&A Advisors, A Different View 26. Miralles Tagliabue, David Woodhouse Architects, Site Design Group, Atelier Ten, TKB, Primera, Schuler Shook, Selbert Perkins Design, Waterline Studios, Concord Group, Sam Schwartz Engineering 27. Morphosis, Terry Guen Design Associates, Arup, Horton Lees Brogden Lighting Design, Pentagram, Merry Norris Contemporary Art 28. MorrisTerra, CD+M Lighting Design Group, WET Design, ESI Design 29. MSI Design, Utopia Entertainment, Hunt Design, Gallegos Lighting, Fluidity Design Consultants 30. OBRA Architects, Dattner Architects, Hood Design, L’Observatoire International, Mary Jane Jacob, CSS, Philip Habib 31 OMA/SGA, SCAPE, Thirst, Tillotson Design Associates, Arup, dbHMS, Patti Gilford Fine Arts, Robert Kirschner, Davis Langdon, KLOA 32. Perkins + Will, Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects, John David Mooney 33. PLANT Architect, Dialog Urban Design, Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects, Enermodal Engineering, United Visual Artists, Leni Schwendinger Light Projects, Dan Euser Water Projects, Andrew Jones, Entro Communications, Beth Kapusta, The Publicity Works 34. Rafael Viñoly Architects, Sasaki Associates, URS Corporation, Thornton Tomasetti, V3 Companies, Alfred Benesch & Company, Pentagram, Art Production Fund, One Lux Studio 35. Rios Clementi Hale Studios, Destefano Partners 36. Rogers Marvel Architects, Rockwell Group, Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects, L’Observatoire International, Mary Jane Jacob 37. Ross Barney Architects, Hoerr Schaudt Landscape Architects, Arup, WET Design, Karpowicz Studios, Thirst, Schuler Shook 38. RTKL Associates, Adjaye Associates, Rios Clemente Hale, Siteworks, Daniel Weinbach & Partners, Speirs + Major, Pentagram, Greenblue, Halvorson and Partners, Joseph Becherer, Fluidity Design Consultants, C.H. Johnson Consultants, Primera 39. Safdie Architects, SCB, SWA Group, Terry Guen Design Associates, Moffatt & Nichol, Sam Schwatz Engineering, Halvorson and Partners, Primera, RME, Cotter Consulting, Concord Group, TKB, Speirs + Major, Pentagram, Fluidity Design Consultants, SMW, Ned Kahn, Electroland, FTL Design Engineering, Motive Industries 40. SANJAY EKTATE 41. SHoP Architects, Brininstool Kerwin + Lynch, Coen + Partners, GCAM Group, Mark Robbins, Pentagram, L’Observatoire International, Acoustic Dimensions, Arup 42. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, Wirtz International, James Carpenter Design Associates 43. STOSS Landscpe Urbanism, MPdL Studio, Myefski Architects, Terry Guen Design Associates, Jacobs Ryan Associates, L’Observatoire International, Studio Blue, Buro Happold, KPFF Consulting Engineers 44. TCL, Grain Collective, ARM 45. UNStudio, CAMES/gibson, Tom Leader Studio, a.g. Licht, Robert Somol, Lord Cultural Resources, Buro Happold, Norcon 46. Vasilko Architects, Philips Farevaag Smallenberg, Sussman Preja & Co., Schuler Shook, Vasilko Architects, Shabica & Associates, CS Associates, WMA Consulting Engineers 47. W Architecture, Handel Architects, Tillett Lighting Design, Site Design Group, 212, Lisa Corrin, Green Shield Ecology 48. WEISS/MANFREDI, Terry Guen Design Associates, Magnusson Klemencic Associates, HR&A Advisors, Brandston Partnership, Construction Cost Systems, Urban Works, Pentagram, dbHMS, Fluidity Design Consultants, Lisa Corrin 49. Woods Bagot, Surfacedesign, Lisa Freiman Curator, Bailey Edwards Architecture, Sherwood Design Engineers, Original Champions of Design 50. WORKSHOP: Ken Smith Landscape Architect, Michael Maltzan Architecture, Guy Nordenson and Associates, EE&K/Perkins Eastman, HR&A Advisors, Site Design Group, Edgewater Resources, Terra Engineering, Tillotson Design Associates, Merry Norris Contemporary Art, April Greiman, Fluidity Design Consultants, ETM Associates, Ambius 51. Xavier Vendrell Studio, Grimshaw Architects, Harley Ellis Devereaux, Arup, Studio Lab, Schuler Shook, IA+igo Manglano-Ovalle, Sarah Herda 52. Zaha Hadid Architects, tvsdesign, Balmori Associates, Halvorson and Partners, Space Agency, Seam
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!melk in Milan
!melk, a brand new landscape architecture and urban design firm, is set to join Arata Isozaki, Daniel Libeskind, and Zaha Hadid, among others, for CityLife, an enormous development planned for the historic Fiera di Milano neighborhood in Milan.  The New York-based !melk, which was founded less than a year ago when Jerry van Eyck left West 8 and teamed up with Evan Rose, won an international competition to design a multi-level piazza, sculpture park, and butterfly garden/pavilion situated within Libeskind’s master plan.  CityLife will include skyscrapers by Isozaki, Libeskind and Hadid, as well as a museum of modern art, commercial center, housing complexes, and a new subway station.  !melk collaborated on its submission with the London-based landscape architect Gustafson Porter as well as One Works and Arup in Milan. Though !melk is a new venture, its principals have plenty of experience.  Jerry van Eyck was a partner at the award-winning Dutch firm West 8 for 17 years.  Most recently he was the project manager for development on Governor’s Island, but left the firm, in part, to pursue more US-based projects.  Ironically, !melk’s first big endeavor puts him back across the pond.  Urban designer Evan Rose is a former partner of San Francisco-based SMWM (recently merged with Perkins + Will) who built up their New York office. The CityLife project, under development by a handful of companies, is one of the largest urban interventions underway in Europe, of which more than 50% will be park space.  Isozaki’s skyscraper, Il Dritto (the Straight One), will be the tallest structure in Italy.  The project will also include waterways that suggest the canals of Lombardy.  Milan Mayor Letizia Moratti, announced !melk’s victory on October 27.   The other finalists were Agence Ter (France), Latitude Nord (France), Proap (Portugal), Latz + Partner (Germany), Rainer Schmidt (Germany), Atelier Girot (Switzerland) and Erika Skabar (Italy).