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Some New, Some Old

Francis Kéré, Office Kovacs, and others tapped for 2019 Coachella installations
Francis Kéré, Office Kovacs, NEWSUBSTANCE, and other artists, architects, and designers have been chosen to bring creative and immersive installations to the Coachella Arts and Music Festival later this year. In years past, the festival has hosted an eclectic cohort of rising and established designers and artists, including Los Angeles–based Bureau Spectacular, Italian artist Edoardo Tresoldi, Nigerian-born, Brooklyn-based artist Olalekan Jeyifous, along with many others. This year’s slate of creatives boasts several new and returning acts, including artist Robert Bose, whose kinetic balloon sculpture was present at the 2017 festival. United Kingdom–based installation artists NEWSUBSTANCE are also making a return this year. Their 2018 installation, Spectra, consisted of a seven-story sloping ramp tower wrapped in polychromic panels. Los Angeles–based Do Lab will also be participating again this year. The professional music festival venue creators have previously created installations for The Great Convergence at the Great Pyramids at Giza in Egypt, the Virgin Music Festival, and other large-scale events and music festivals around the globe. In 2018, Do Lab created a tent-like performance venue for Coachella that was fashioned out of yellow and blue triangulated panels. https://www.instagram.com/p/BsKcG6KHeJD/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet Absurdist art duo Dedo Vabo will also be returning to Coachella this year. In 2018, the team brought Corporate Office, a multi-story, LED-wrapped diorama to the festival. This year’s first-time acts are due to bring a breath of fresh air to the festival. Los Angeles–based Office Kovacs, helmed by Andrew Kovacs and Erin K. Wright, will be a part of the festival for the first time this year. Office Kovacs recently completed an installation at Woodbury University’s Wedge Gallery and also received an honorable mention designation for the Lima Art Museum New Contemporary Art Wing competition in 2016. Architect Francis Kéré will also be exhibiting his work at the festival for the first time in 2019. Kéré is currently working on a musical reflection pavilion for the Tippet Rise Art Center in Montana, among several other international projects. DKLA Design, a group of designers known for their life-like animal and abstract public art sculptures around the country, will bring their stand-alone pieces to this year’s festival, as well. Experiential designers Poetic Kinetics will bring one of their iconic works to Coachella. In 2016, the team partnered with the Architectural Association Visiting School Los Angeles (AAVSLA) summer program, the City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, and the arts organization NOW Art L.A. to create Liquid Shard, a mesmerizing, iridescent wind-driven sculpture for L.A.’s Pershing Square park. Local artists Sofia Enriquez and Raices Cultura will also create installations for the festival, which takes place April 12-14 and again April 19-21. For more information, see the festival's website.
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Government Sh*tdown

Waste is piling up in national parks thanks to government shutdown
As the nationwide federal government shutdown enters its second week, the country’s national parks and historical monuments are straining under increasing quantities of trash and human waste. Because many sites have remained at least partially open during the shutdown despite a lack of National Park Service staff, trash is not being picked up, bathrooms are filling to capacity with human waste, and visitors are running wild. Small groups of volunteers and local businesses have stepped in to fill some of the staffing gaps by donating toiletries and by helping to clean and sanitize bathrooms, but it has not proven to be enough to prevent widespread disorder. The Los Angeles Times reported that illegal camping activities have increased in Joshua Tree National Park outside Los Angeles, where hundreds of thousands of visitors frequent the park during the busy holiday season. According to the report, visitors have lit illegal fires in the park and in some instances, have strung Christmas lights from the park’s namesake Joshua trees, a spiky species of yucca that can reach 40 feet in height and only grows in the Mojave Desert. Joshua Tree National Park closed to visitors on Wednesday due to the sordid conditions. In nearby Death Valley National Park, local concessionaires have picked up where the Park Service left off and are currently maintaining the park’s trash and bathroom facilities. https://twitter.com/schwellenbach/status/1080462580114747392?s=21 Unlike previous shutdowns, local and state authorities across the country have enacted contingency plans to keep parks and historical sites open during the current impasse, a practice that has helped keep local businesses dependent on park traffic afloat but has left the parks open to unmitigated destruction. Joe De Luca, a sales associate at Nomad Ventures in the town of Joshua Tree told The Washington Post, “The parks are supposed to be heritage sites for generation after generation. I would rather they close than be damaged.” The Daily News reported that Yosemite National Park in Northern California was forced to close this week after visitors were found defecating beside roads in the park. In Utah, the Arches and Canyonlands National Parks were also forced to close because no one was around to plow snowed-in roads, according to the Salt Lake Tribune. The shutdown comes as scandal-plagued Secretary of Interior Ryan Zinke officially steps down. There is hope yet, however. A new Democratic majority is taking office in the House of Representatives on Thursday and is widely expected to pass a new funding bill to reopen the government.
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Are You Featured?

You said it! Presenting the best reader comments of 2018
Where would we be without you, dear readers? Without you, there’d be no Architect’s Newspaper AN’s most read stories of 2018 had some of the best comments. Even Patrik Schumacher came to defend himself in our comments section. Take a look at some of our favorite comments from the year. Last month, we posted an open letter from friends and colleagues of the late Zaha Hadid against Schumacher. They addressed their concerns about the settlement of her estate, the Zaha Hadid Foundation, and the governance and future of her firm (ZHA). Schumacher swooped in to defend himself, claiming we didn't hear his side of the story. Patrik, dear friend, we're open to talking. Meanwhile, we cackled at Norman McDougall's punny joke about the cancelation of Elon Musk's planned tunnel for L.A. Steve McLaughlin was disappointed with the tracklist on the architect's mixtape.  What he doesn't know is that our executive editor, Matt Shaw, breathes and walks the spirit of the famous quote Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, “music is liquid architecture; architecture is frozen music.” After The Man in the Glass House was released, author Mark Lamster left us wondering just how much of a Nazi was Philip Johnson. But Rhys Philips said that he was surprised people ever believed in all the Johnson propaganda. These readers weren't so impressed with Fentress Architects' design for the U.S. pavilion at Expo 2020 Dubai. On Twitter, Bjarke Ingels Wilder (the love child of Bjarke Ingels and Billy Wilder?) poked fun at Daniel Libeskind's affinity for sharp angles when the architect's design for the Rockefeller Center Christmas Tree star was revealed. And according to Brian Mark Camille, getting an Uber might be faster than the Virgin Hyperloop One. Who knows what people will say next year?
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Can't-ilevering

Morphosis unveils a claw-like hotel to replace a legendary L.A. nightclub
The Viper Room, the legendary Los Angeles nightclub cofounded by Johnny Depp (and where River Phoenix overdosed) is set to get an architecturally ambitious replacement courtesy of Morphosis Architects. After developer Silver Creek Development Co. picked up the parcel in West Hollywood for $80 million in July of this year, it was announced that a 15-story hotel would go up on the site. Last week the public was given its first look at the replacement, which features a vise-like volume “clamping” down on a more traditional, loggia-adorned tower. The proposal also sports glassy ground-level retail bordered by V-shaped concrete columns. The 200-foot-tall hotel will feature 115 hotel rooms, 31 condo units, 10 affordable units, a gym, a spa, restaurants, a pool, and a new home for the Viper Room. It’s somewhat hard to see in the rendering, but the developer wants to include an 820-square-foot digital billboard on the Sunset Boulevard–facing facade. The project’s initial reveal came at a community meeting on December 11, where Silver Creek sought to solicit community feedback and refine the design. The hotel will move next to the West Hollywood Planning Commission’s Design Review Subcommittee, and then the Planning Commission proper. No construction timeline has been given as of yet.
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Virtual Victory

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Digital Fabrication
2018 Best of Design Award for Digital Fabrication: 260 Kent Designer: COOKFOX Architects Location: Brooklyn, New York

Slated to be the tallest tower in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 260 Kent by COOKFOX Architects was designed using an innovative precast exterior concept inspired by the molecular structure of sugar crystals. In a unique collaboration between the architect, developer, and Gate Precast, the same BIM model that was used to design the facade and create early scaled 3D-printed models was utilized to print molds for the precast panels. When complete, the facade is intended to act as a shading element. Opening in fall 2019, the 42-story tower will join the already open 325 Kent and Domino Park as the latest edition to the Domino Sugar waterfront redevelopment project.

Honorable Mentions Project Name: A.V. Bath House Designer: Facilities Design Group Location: Custer, Michigan Project Name: MARS Pavilion Designer: Form Found Design Location: Los Angeles  
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A Subway, But For Cars

Elon Musk unveils prototype Boring Company tunnel under Los Angeles
After over two years of internet-fueled hype and fast-paced construction, erratic billionaire Elon Musk has unveiled a prototype tunnel outside Los Angeles that aims to test his far-fetched vision for a new urban transportation network below the region’s notoriously traffic-choked streets. The so-called Loop project is envisioned as a series of tunnels that could ferry private automobiles, and pods carrying pedestrians and bicyclists at speeds approaching 150 miles per hour. The tunnels, accessible from a network of parking spot-sized lifts, could eventually connect the city’s major landmarks and neighborhoods, according to a preliminary map unveiled last year. https://twitter.com/boringcompany/status/1075318894871470081?s=21 The Boring Company–backed test tunnel took shape beneath a neighborhood sandwiched between a municipal airport and Interstate 110 in Hawthrone, California, where several of Musk’s companies are headquartered. Although the test tunnel debuted with several key design changes—including the elimination of so-called “skate” platforms that private automobiles would ride on and actual travel speeds that barely approached 50 miles per hour—the bumpy debut was met with cautious optimism by observers, according to The Los Angeles Times. With a reported cost of about $40 million, the roughly mile-long test tunnel was built for a fraction of the cost of conventional subway technologies, though that is not exactly an apples-to-apples comparison, given the tube’s diminutive size relative to conventional transit routes, the fact that it was not built with unionized labor, and its overall reduced passenger capacity. According to The New York Times, Musk referred to the tunnel as “a real solution to the traffic problem we have on earth,” adding, “It’s much more like an underground highway.” The opening of the test tunnel follows the high-profile setback for Musk’s plan to build a second tube underneath the streets of the City of Los Angeles that came last month. The Boring Company is also working on a tunnel that would connect downtown Chicago with O’Hare Airport as well as a more modest loop that could potentially link L.A.’s existing subway system with Dodger Stadium.
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A Year in Sports (Architecture)

Let's kick it: Here are the top sports architecture stories of 2018
Is the United States becoming more serious about soccer? We think we have evidence to say that it is. AN’s most popular sports stories of 2018 center around the world’s greatest sport, telling us that this year’s uptick of soccer-related architecture news signals a newfound appreciation for the game in our country. Read on for several developments you should pay attention to, and other stories about why sustainable stadium design is also on the rise. David Beckham’s Miami soccer village reveals Arquitectonica’s designs Miami is set to receive its first Major League Soccer (MLS) team, backed by soccer superstar David Beckham who plans to build a 73-acre campus for the city called “Miami Freedom Park.” Arquitectonica revealed new renderings of the sports village, complete with a sweeping, 25,000-seat soccer stadium. In November, local residents voted to approve the project and its projected location on the city-owned Melreese Country Club golf course, meaning Beckham’s vision is one step closer to breaking ground. Nashville’s new $2 million soccer stadium takes shape In December 2016, MLS announced a major club expansion to four U.S. cities including Nashville, Tennessee. Though the southern city wasn’t sure it’d be awarded a new team, plans for a multimillion-dollar stadium project had been in the works for over a year. This February, HOK released its first renderings of the new stadium, which will be constructed inside the Fairgrounds, home of the Tennessee State Fair. Selecting the central site was a contentious process throughout 2017 when a lawsuit was filed citing the city had violated its charter by proposing the project on public grounds. 2026 World Cup preview: Which U.S. cities will host? As Qatar preps for the 2022 World Cup, the United States is on deck to host the 2026 games alongside Canada and Mexico. That’s exciting news for a country whose national team rarely makes it into the World Cup lineup—the joint bid automatically ensures us a spot. But what’s not yet official are the 10 cities that will host events. We know that 60 of the 80 planned matches will be played in the U.S., including those from the quarterfinals onwards, but currently, 17 cities are still in the running. Which top towns, along with their state-of-the-art stadiums (which are an integral part of the individual bid), will make the cut? We’ve listed all the contenders here from Atlanta’s new Mercedes Benz Stadium by HOK (host of the 2019 Super Bowl) to the classic Rose Bowl in Los Angeles. Naturally-ventilated Louis Armstrong Stadium debuts at US Open Ahead of this September’s US Open, the USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center finished a five-year, $600 million renovation project of its campus in Flushing, Queens, New York. The massive update included the buildout of the new Louis Armstrong Stadium, the world’s first naturally ventilated tennis arena with a retractable roof. Designed by Detroit-based firm Rossetti, the 14,000-seat stadium replaces the former Louis Armstrong Stadium, which was demolished after the 2016 championship. The new structure features the same stacked seating style as its predecessor but serves up extra sustainability with the exterior overlapping terracotta louvers that act as horizontal window blinds. New home of the Texas Rangers has a climate-controlling, retractable roof HKS has designed a new 41,000-seat baseball stadium for the Texas Rangers in Arlington, Texas, set to replace the old Globe Life Park in 2020. The aptly named Globe Life Field will be a glass- and brick-clad structure featuring new climate-controlling infrastructure and a retractable roof. HKS’s design for the 1.7 million-square-foot ballpark was inspired by the vernacular style of Texas farmhouse porches. BIG unveils designs for new Oakland A’s stadium featuring a rooftop park Late this November, Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) and the Oakland Athletics unveiled plans for a new baseball park and mixed-use campus in Oakland, California. Complete with a literally diamond-shaped stadium, the project is being pitched as a double-play for the city. It will feature an open and accessible landscape situated within Oakland’s underutilized Howard Terminal and will also include housing, recreational spots, and a business hub. Gensler and James Corner Field Operations will work alongside BIG to build out the mega-green space by 2021.
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Professor of Cities

Thom Mayne to take over SCI-Arc’s cities program
Thom Mayne of Morphosis will be rejoining the Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc) as a full-time distinguished faculty member as the new coordinator for the SCI-Arc EDGE Design of Cities postgraduate program. Mayne, one of the original founders of SCI-Arc, will be taking over the Design of Cities program from current coordinator David Ruy, who will stay on as head of postgraduate studies at the school. Regarding Mayne’s new post, SCI-Arc director Hernan Diaz Alonso said:
“It is wonderful to have Thom Mayne come back home. He is a major part of what SCI-Arc is, was, and will be. Thom Mayne represents everything that we want our students to aspire to. Thom embodies the best aspirations of architecture as a historical, cultural, and political force that is unique among creative disciplines. Thom will help us to maintain the unique spirit of exploration that defines SCI-Arc. In the contemporary world, architectural thinking should be a platform for challenging the status quo. We welcome back to SCI-Arc, one of the pioneers of this idea.”
Mayne has extensive experience as an educator and has held teaching positions at Columbia, Yale, the Harvard Graduate School of Design, the Berlage Institute in the Netherlands, the Bartlett School of Architecture in London, and most recently at the University of California, Los Angeles, where Mayne led the school’s Suprastudio, among other institutions. The Design of Cities program is focused, according to the SCI-Arc website, “against the conventional wisdom that cities are hopelessly complex, informal networks beyond the reach of any design model, this program fundamentally believes in the power of the architectural imagination to create sustainable urban designs for the twenty-first century and beyond.” With a long legacy of urban- and sustainability-focused work and research under his belt and a growing momentum toward regional urban transformation in Los Angeles and California more broadly, expect to see Mayne’s provocative ideas take on new life as he undertakes his new position.
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Big Names, Small Stuff

Woodbury launches Small Scale Architecture Store in time for the holidays
If you have some holiday shopping left to do, you're in luck. The Woodbury University School of Architecture in Los Angeles has launched a Small Scale Architecture Store just in time for the holidays. Located at the university's WUHO Gallery in Hollywood, the store features products and furniture pieces created by thought-provoking designers including Bureau Spectacular, DOT DOT DOT, Jenny Wu, New Affiliates, Ryan Tyler Martinez, ver|texx, and Yeh Studio. The store aims to "celebrate and sell the work of designers who push the boundaries of architecture and object, function and assembly, material and product, to produce indispensable objects to wear, utilize, adorn, carry, occupy, enlighten, and beautify" according to a press release. Included in the products that are up for sale are city-themed plates from NotNeutral, the product arm of RCH Studios, a faceted pendant light from DOT DOT DOT, fiberglass chairs from LA Forum and Modernica, and a Helicoid planter by Paul Anvar, among many others. Proceeds from the sales of the work will fund Woodbury University School of Architecture student scholarships. The store will run until December 23. See the WUHO Gallery website for more information.
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The Gift of Architecture

Last minute holiday shopping? Here’s what to get an architect
Trying to find a gift for a person who loves to build? We’ve asked our editors, our architect friends, and our friends who love architecture what was on their wish lists this year. From a cowboy-style hard hat to an architecture mixtape, there’s something for every architect on the 2019 AN gift guide. Happy shopping!  

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Glass House Snow Globe The Glass House Design Store $75 The Glass House is arguably the most visited (if not the most well-known) of all of Philip Johnson’s works. Architects and architecture enthusiasts alike can behold the modern icon frozen in time inside of a snow globe like no other.   Architect’s Cubes MoMA Design Store $58 Designed to inspire forms and exploration of materials, architects John Bennet and Gustavo Bonevardi conceived a set of eight cubes. Each made of a different material—maple wood, bakelite, cork, granite, EVA, silicone, acrylic, and aluminum—the Architect’s Cubes are made for play. Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models: 14 Kirigami Buildings to Cut and Fold by Marc Hagan-Guirey $23 Build paper models of the most notable Frank Lloyd Wright buildings with this cut-and-fold kit. Using the art of kirigami (the cousin of origami), paper artist Marc Hagan-Guirey devised some of Wright’s most admired architecture, including Falling Water, the Guggenheim, and the National Life Insurance Building. LEGO Architecture Imperial Hotel $160 Built in 1915, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo was a fusion of Japanese and Western architecture. While it was demolished in 1968, the lobby and reflecting pool were moved to the Japanese architecture museum Meiji-Mura. You can create your own small-scale replica of the lost landmark with this set of LEGO building blocks.

Books and Stationery

The LEGO Architect By Tom Alphin $15 You know the saying, “learn by doing?” The LEGO Architect does exactly that. Flipping through the pages you first learn about the history of architecture and then find inspiration to build your own with images of LEGO models of iconic buildings. In the last section, the author instructs readers how to become LEGO architects with a set of instructions and parts from the LEGO Architecture Studio. Happy building! Architecture Christmas Cards $18 Chicago’s Marina City sporting a Santa hat; the Farnsworth House decked out like the yard of your neighbor who decorates for Christmas the day after Halloween; Seattle’s Space Needle adorned with a fir pine. These and other buildings we all know and love have been turned into Christmas cards by a former AN editor, John Stoughton. Available in packs of ten. An Architect’s Pencil Set: The Colors of Michael Graves $25 It’s no secret: One of the things Michael Graves is known for is his love (and mastery) of colors (mainly bright colors). Designed by his firm, this 24 colored-pencil set comes with an essay on color and the architect's design process. Rem Koolhaas. Elements of Architecture $125 Love to build? Rem Koolhaas worked with Harvard Graduate School of Design on “a primordial toolkit” that helps readers to understand how the seemingly constant fundamentals of architecture are actually always in flux and evolving. The guidebook chronicles the fundamentals of buildings and design techniques, detailing every single typology, from windows to walls to toilets. Hollywood Modern: Houses of the Stars by Alan Hess and Michael Stern $55 Are celebrities your guilty pleasure? This book documents 24 "modern" homes designed by architects for stars in Southern California. Featuring glossy, full-page photos, Hollywood Modern: House of the Stars gives you an inside look at houses like Quincy Jones's Gary Cooper House and Richard Neutra's Von Sternberg House.

To Wear

M1005 Matsuda $425 It all started with Le Corbusier and his fabulous round glasses. The black circular frames that we have all come to love have become part and parcel with architecture (having spectacular spectacles has become a common trope in the industry as a whole). Japanese optical maker Matsuda offers a frame that looks particularly Corbu-inspired. M1005 is hand finished with acetate and available in five colors. Architect Tools Tie $45 Long before AutoCAD, architects' tools were as important as scissors to a barber. This tie features a motif made up of drafting tools. While rulers and tape measures remain essential, so does the occasional smart tie. Cowboy-style Hard Hat $65 Get your hard hat on, cowboy! This is not your typical construction cap, it’s a new take that comes in the guise of a cowboy hat with all the safety benefits of a traditional hard hat. Yeehaw!

For the Home

Sunset & Night Chairs By LA Forum and Modernica Mies van der Rohe once said: “A chair is a very difficult object. A skyscraper is almost easier.” These fiberglass chairs by Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design and fiberglass furniture purveyor Modernica are no exception. Even better, the proceeds from their sale will fund scholarships at Woodbury School of Architecture. You can find them at Small Scale Architecture Store in at the university's WUHO Gallery in Hollywood through December 23. Twist Again Odile Decq for Alessi $105 Finally, you can bring home an object designed by our favorite gothic architect (and seminal thinker), Odile Decq. Known as “the fruit holder that dances around the fruit,” the bowl reflects the common visual motifs that are associated with her works, only on a smaller scale. It is made from a piece of sheet metal that was cut and folded to create a whimsical, vortex-like shape that seemingly has an inner life force of its own. The Architect’s Mixtape: Practicing Spaces $10 Drop those funky beats! Practicing Spaces is a compilation of musical works by lesser-known musicians who all have one thing in common: they’re architects! From Michael Meredith of MOS Architects to Florian Idenburg of SO – IL, these funky beats are available in the format of a mixtape, that is, a cassette tape. Read more about the collective work and where to buy your own copy here.
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Layered Living

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Residential — Multi Unit
2018 Best of Design Award for Residential — Multi Unit: St. Thomas / Ninth Designer: OJT Location: New Orleans

The St. Thomas / Ninth project is composed of 12 starter homes occupying an existing warehouse and vacant parcel. OJT designed the complex in order to make the best possible use of the industrial edge site. Embracing the warehouse language became a springboard for the firm’s formal exploration of the remainder of the site. Because OJT worked with abnormally large lot minimums for single-family structures, the firm mandated a tactic that leveraged the density allowed under multifamily development regulations, but organized the site as a single-family assemblage. Each home touches down minimally in order to free the ground plane to become a courtyard. The residual spaces between buildings are reclaimed as front porches, giving each dwelling a sense of entry and ownership. Meanwhile, pitched roofs accent the industrial character of the neighborhood.

Honorable Mentions Project Name: Tolsá 61 Designer: CPDA Arquitectos Location: Mexico City Project Name: Elysian Fields Designer: Warren Techentin Architecture Location: Los Angeles
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Building Wall and Building Wall Quickly

Weekend edition: Amazon gets grilled, Brutalism gets preserved, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Stunning new photos document I.M. Pei’s early brutalist museum I.M. Pei's first museum design, The Everson Museum of Art, is a big, brutalist structure that's celebrating its 50th birthday in Syracuse, New York. Chicago aims to preserve the vernacular architecture in its largest Mexican-American community The Commission on Chicago Landmarks has approved a preliminary designation for a dense array of vernacular buildings in the heart of Pilsen. Against all odds, progressive land-use reforms are taking root in American cities With Minneapolis, San Francisco, and Los Angeles moving forward with land-use reforms, the thinking behind how American cities work could soon change. DHS says it is “building wall and building wall quickly” in bizarre statement In an odd press release, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security touts quick construction of the U.S.-Mexico border wall key sections. New York’s proposal for Amazon’s HQ2 is much worse than we thought The concessions from the city have raised eyebrows and triggered a trio of City Council hearings on the terms of the deal.