Search results for "Hudson Yards"

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It’s Kind of a BIG Deal

Renderings revealed of High Line luxury development by Bjarke Ingels Group
New renderings and details on Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) multiuse development under construction on 76 11th Avenue along New York City’s High Line park were released yesterday. The project, dubbed “The Eleventh” will contain a five-star 137 key Six Senses hotel and spa (the company’s first in U.S. location) in the East Tower and approximately 240 luxury apartments split between the two towers, as well as retail space and a public promenade accompanying the adjacent High Line. “When we acquired the last major downtown development site in 2015 we had a blank slate to create a new neighborhood on one of the world’s most valuable and desired pieces of land,” said HFZ Capital Group chairman and founder Ziel Feldman in a press release. The Eleventh will consist of two towers that, at an estimated 300- and 400-feet tall, will be the tallest buildings in the West Chelsea neighborhood (the West tower will be the taller of the two), ensuring panoramic views of downtown and midtown Manhattan and the Hudson River. In addition to the 240 condominiums and hotel, taking up roughly 950,000 square feet, 90,000 square feet will be devoted to retail. The two, twisting towers topped with glass “crowns” have a distinct BIG geometric sleekness about them that is, if not reminiscent of, then certainly complementary to the firm’s VIA 57 West and “The Spiral,” both just north along the Hudson River. According to the press release, the buildings are inspired by “New York City's classic modernist structures and cultural institutions … The punched window openings, meanwhile, are an important nod to the past, a reference to the historic industrial buildings of the neighborhood and nearby Meatpacking District.” The Eleventh joins a slew of starchitecture along the High Line, including Zaha Hadid’s West 28th Street, Neil Denari’s HL23, DS+R’s “The Shed,” and Renzo Piano’s Whitney Museum. The Eleventh is slated to open 2019.
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Going Up

Plans filed for $3.2 billion Bjarke Ingels-designed tower at Hudson Yards
New York-based developer Tishman Speyer officially filed their plans for the $3.2 billion, 65-story office skyscraper designed by Copenhagen-based Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG). Dubbed the Spiral for its continuous band of terraces, the tower will reach a height of 1,005 feet. BIG has been quite busy in New York—they just wrapped Via 57 West and The Architect's Newspaper has even heard they're being passed over for projects because clients fear their office is too busy. Though the plans filed with the city only call for 2.2 million square feet, Tishman Speyer is marketing the property at 2.85 million square feet in size; the project will also include 27,000 square feet of retail space on the ground floor. The Spiral is one of two towers in Hudson Yards already being considered by investment firm BlackRock (if the company decides to leave its Park Avenue home, according to a report by Crain’s New York Business). Back in 2014, Tishman Speyer paid $438 million for the two parcels of land where the Spiral will stand; the company also received a $170 million, 25-year tax abatement on the project later that year. When tenants of two townhouse apartments at 35th Street and 10th Ave. refused to move out, Tishman Speyer paid them a $25 million settlement to vacate the premises in order to move forward with their plans, instead of spending years in court battling it out against the now infamous tenant attorney David Rozenholc, according to Gothamist Tishman Speyer has received over $1 billion from international investors to move the project forward and the developer hopes to pre-lease a third of the building to cover the remaining costs of construction, as reported by The Real Deal. The company also purchased two additional parcels of land across from the Javits Center at 11th Avenue earlier this year, with plans to build another 1.3 million-square-foot office tower.
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Final Five

BREAKING: Designs for new Port Authority bus terminal revealed
The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey has announced five finalists teams in its competition to design a new bus terminal in New York City. The finalists are: Arcadis of New York, Archilier Architecture ConsortiumHudson Terminal Center CollaborativePelli Clarke Pelli Architects, and Perkins Eastman. The Port Authority Bus Terminal International Design + Deliverability Competition solicits conceptual plans for a bus terminal on Manhattan's west side that would replace the 65-year-old dreaded pit of doom that commuters must traverse to get out of and into the city from New Jersey and elsewhere. The competition is part of a master plan that rethinks both the terminal and its surroundings. The redesigned terminal will accommodate an expected increase in passenger flows. Today, the terminal accommodates 7,000 buses and 220,000 passenger trips each weekday. In 25 years, the Port Authority estimates that ridership is expected to increase 35 to 51 percent 2040. The agency's Trans-Hudson Commuting Capacity Study, as well as input from riders, neighbors, and area community groups, will guide concept designs.
In Phase one of the competition, the agency sought out "design-led" teams with expertise in engineering and architecture, transportation planning, financing, and land use. The current phase, Phase two, culled the best submissions from phase one for a round of refinement towards a deliverable conceptual design and method for bringing the concept to action. Each finalist submitted detailed multimedia presentations to introduce their concepts. Arcadis of New York's entry, below, positions the terminal over Dyer Avenue, and shows a sleek, light-filled atrium edged with green. The team includes ARCADISSam Schwartz Transportation Consultants, Benthem Crouwel Architects, and CallisonRTKL, among others. https://youtu.be/7jz5LEOTZUo Archilier Architecture Consortium proposes a four-million-square-foot terminal topped with a 9.8-acre rooftop park and rounded out by a 33,000-square-foot plaza on Eighth Avenue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XIT6rx6rNnE Hudson Terminal Center Collaborative is comprised of STV AECOM, SOM, McMillen Jacobs (MMJ), Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers (MRCE), CBRE, CIBC, James Lima Planning + Development, and Duke Geological Laboratory. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9eFIOsz-XA Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects' team includes BuroHappold and WXY among its 16 collaborators. The design features a curving skylight and green-roofed building that connects with Hudson Yards to the west and Times Square to the east. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zF2k6D_w-IQ Perkins Eastman's entry, created in collaboration with ARUP and Mikyoung Kim Design, among others, puts the bus terminal on the lowest floor of the Javitz Center to get the buses off the local street network. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-DVLqhHNU8o The winning team will receive a one million dollar honorarium. Read more about entry guidelines and submissions criteria here.
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Vessel

Heatherwick Studio unveils design for new device at Hudson Yards
Over the din of construction on nearby towers, today Anderson Cooper moderated a panel discussion and design unveiling of Vessel, Heatherwick Studio's new public work at Hudson Yards
Stephen M. Ross, president of Related Companies, Thomas Woltz, founding principal of Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects (NBW), and Thomas Heatherwick of Heatherwick Studios spoke with Cooper about the value of public space in New York and the opportunities that designing a park and plaza ab ova present. The project's cost was previously reported as $200 million, though there's been no update on whether that's changed with the just-unveiled design.
"Vessel was really unlike anything I've ever seen in New York. We wanted something great. The city is about having great public places," gushed Ross, whose real estate firm is a co-developer of Hudson Yards, the 365-acre mixed-used development on Manhattan's Far West Side. Heatherwick's design, he said, "was love at first sight.”

In a see-and-be-seen city where even the ultra-rich schlep in and out of the subway, Vessel elevates the time-honored art of flânerie to civic priority. Its 154 vertiginous steel-and-concrete staircases are meant to help visitors experience Hudson Yards and surrounding people from as many angles as desired (or, perhaps, angles unintended). The stairs and viewing platforms converge in a lattice that suggests a panopticon with the geometry of an inverted beehive. When complete, the 16-story structure will be the tallest freestanding observation platform in the city (at least until the New York Wheel starts rolling).

"So often, historic public spaces are commemorating kings, or battles, or tragedies. But this is a new public space. It would be a fake duty to look back," Heatherwick told The Architect's Newspaper. Instead, the project reacts to a 21st-century urban condition: "Buildings are getting bigger and bigger—that mega-scale, it's something new. But 2,000 years ago, humans were mostly the same size we are now. The human scale stays true. This project was not driven by fitness or health alone, but more by how we could nurture the human scale."

Hudson Yards, Cooper maintained, needed an attraction for those humans—a Christmas tree 365 days per year but also something the public could interact with. “It was an extraordinary thing, to make a new public square, in the center of the city," Heatherwick said, comparing Hudson Yards to Trafalgar Square and Bryant Park. "We felt enormous pressure to not make gardens but to make an urban square, an extension of New York."

The design blends a key cue from the High Line—elevation—and reacts to the city’s fire escapes, stoops, and the countless staircases that facilitate the flow of people in the city. “We wanted to make a project out of just stairs, an ultimate body thing,” Heatherwick explained. Visitors can hit their FitBit goals twice over by climbing 250 flights to the structure's top.

On the ground, NBW collaborated with Heatherwick to create the Public Square and Gardens at Hudson Yards, a six-acre public space that links Hudson Yards with Hudson River Park and the High Line, which will get a new on-site entrance at Tenth Avenue and 30th Street.

Like Heatherwick, who designed Vessel's teacup form with upper-story office workers in mind, Woltz wanted "to create a site that was quite graphic" for the square and gardens. The firm consulted 400-year-old maps to determine the site's original environmental conditions (it was a wet meadow) and captured a snapshot of native flora from that time, Woltz told AN.

This is one of NBW's two active commissions for landscapes over infrastructure: The platform the park sits on is the ventilation cover for the rail yard below, and the platform had to be engineered to support 200 mature trees. “The landscape operates in a seven-foot-thick sandwich of structure. I will never in my life take for granted being on real earth, because everything here is constructed,” Woltz said.

Amid exhalations on Twitter, some raised concerns about the accessibility of the public spaces, especially Vessel, whose stair-fixation seemed to exclude parents with strollers and people who use wheelchairs.

A model depicted elevators on a fixed track—hardly the expansive views and exuberant movement promised by the architects. The project is inclusive, Heatherwick maintained. He told AN that the model is outdated; new renderings, including the bird's eye view, below, were captured from elevators that snake around Vessel's insides on curving tracks.

The High Line, with the new perspectives it gives people on public (and private) space, was key to Heatherwick's approach to Vessel, which he calls "a device, not a sculpture." In the most successful public spaces, there's a chemistry to seeing that's aided by human interaction, he said. A good public space, too, should offer an element of play. "I asked, 'Why are playgrounds only made for children?' We're creating a vertical structure for all of us."

Vessel will be complete in 2018.

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Buckhead Park Over GA400

New renderings revealed for ambitious, highway-capping park in Atlanta
Atlanta is planning a cap-and-trade of the best kind: Today, ROGERS PARTNERS Architects+Urban Designers (Rogers Partners) and Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects released more details of a proposal to cover a stretch of highway in the city's Buckhead neighborhood and convert it to a lush nine-acre park. "Buckhead Park Over GA400 is a new park typology for the city. Most Atlanta parts are historic, or like Centennial Park, built for a special purpose [such as the Olympics]. This park will create quality public space where you already have density. Like most great public places, it's about creating a series of scaled experiences" for visitors, explained Rob Rogers, principal at Rogers Partners. Thomas Woltz, principal at Nelson Byrd Woltz, added that the park, which straddles an eight-lane highway, "is connected to existing infrastructure and is being built in found space, much like New York's Hudson Yards and Millennium Park in Chicago." The pair presented their design this morning for Buckhead Park Over GA400 to the board of the project's sponsors, the Buckhead Community Improvement District (BCID). Buckhead, an affluent neighborhood in northern Atlanta that's crisscrossed by interstate and local highways, is one of the city's primary commercial districts, with dense development clustered along its main corridor, Peachtree Road. As car-oriented Atlanta grows, the city is looking to enhance the quality of its green spaces and encourage walkable environments. Buckhead Park Over GA400 is born out of that ambition, and designed as a local park with regional pull, Rogers and Woltz agreed. A series of public spaces—the plaza, the commons, and the gardens—will be complemented by MARTA stations that bring commuters into the neighborhood and by connections to the Atlanta Beltline, and Path 400, a state-funded recreational trails initiative.
"When we started the project, one of the things we thought was most exciting was taking this void in the middle of the neighborhood, and turning that into the heart of Buckhead as a public space. When you're making this major public space, we thought, 'How do you ground that? How do you make this part of Atlanta?'" Woltz said. The design team looked to nature: the Appalachian foothills are one of the most biodiverse areas on the planet, so he and Rogers decided to ground the design of the ab ovo park in the region's bio-heritage. The curving lawns, stepped seating, and sweeping overhead paths that will guide visitors over sunken lanes of traffic are manifestations of the region's ecology, abstracted through form, material choices, and horticulture, especially. The plaza's high canopies evoke the native savannah, while upland ecology is represented in the park's commons, which is scaled to host large events. The gardens off of Peachtree Road buffer visitors from that busy, car-oriented thoroughfare. Even at the conceptual level, the design choices reflect structural considerations, Woltz explained. A half-mile-long allée linking the plaza, the commons, and the gardens will be planted over the structure of the train tracks, so the designers know they will have enough stability to support mature trees. "This approach is the opposite of decorating the outdoors with plants," Woltz added. "We're selecting the most resilient plants that are still iconic for this ecology." Woltz and Rogers are hopeful that the next part of concept study, which includes community outreach and deeper financial analysis, will move forward soon.
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Under New Management

AN talks to Michael Samuelian, the next president and CEO of the Trust for Governors Island
With new leadership at its helm, Governors Island, the 172-acre island in the middle of New York Harbor, is poised for some exciting changes. The Architect's Newspaper (AN) spoke with Michael Samuelian about balancing public and private space in new developments, changes on the New York City waterfront, and his soon-to-be-finalized new job as president and CEO of the Trust for Governors Island. AN: You are a board member of Friends of Governors Island. How were you selected for your new role? Michael Samuelian: Through conversations with the mayor's office, with [deputy mayor] Alicia Glen's office, a few key people on the board of the Trust, some of whom I knew, some I didn't know. I don't know how many people they were speaking with at the time, it was not an atypical series of conversations; we spoke about the position, about why I wanted it, and how I can give back to the city. As a vice president at Related Companies you were responsible for the development of Hudson Yards, a project that weaves together public and private space. What lessons from that project will you be bringing to Governors Island? For the last couple of years I was predominately responsible for public space at the Yards, and its interaction with the High Line, the Shed, the Community Board, and the BID, all of the outward-facing entities, so I certainly learned about the balance of public and private needs on the job. I think that's one of the most important things I'll bring to Governors Island. Governors Island is not about creating the most value, necessarily, it's about creating the right mix of uses. That's what I'm most excited about. With Hudson Yards, it was about integrating the project with the rest of the neighborhood. With an island, there's not a lot of integration you can do, but you can focus on some of the most important aspects of public space, which are connectivity and vitality. That's what we want at Governors Island... to create a place that's a real destination, that New Yorkers fall in love with. There's a lot of development happening on the island's south side: The Hills were just completed and there are more opportunities for private development there as well. Could you speak to how you see those public and private spaces being integrated? The most important thing—one of the things the mayor and I discussed about the role—number one, is do no harm. Governors Island is a fantastic place today, and like a good doctor, you don't want to kill the patient, you want to make him better. Our challenge on Governors Island is that it's a fantastic place already, but how do we make it better? The issue of balance is important to me, figuring out what the right balance of public and private uses while making it even more accessible to people. While we have half a million people coming there per year; that pales in comparison to other public parks. One of my first priorities is getting more people, more New Yorkers, to the island and figuring out that right balance of uses. That will be through some additional private uses. But the number one thing is enhancing accessibility, getting more people to the island. There's some concern about private uses there and honestly I don't come with any predisposed notion of what should happen on the island. The other important concept is plurality. There's not one big idea that will make the island magical, it's already magical. It's really about finding the right balance of uses there. Aside from the public space, not one use should dominate the island; all the other uses should support the public space. I hear you. Is there an ideal balance of uses in your mind, though, or the Trust's mind? We have to figure that out. We really want to harness the energy of the city, and aside from housing, that could be any use under the sun: Institutional, cultural, commercial, retail, hotel. Our first task is to figure out what the appropriate mix of uses is, in order to answer the number one goal, which is enhancing access to the island. What are the great public uses that will get people to experience the island? All of the historic buildings, and the public spaces that just opened, those are starting to gain traction with visitors. For the first time, more people are coming to Governors Island from the Brooklyn side rather than the Manhattan side. I think that's an important thing for people to know. It's an island for everyone, not just north Brooklyn or lower Manhattan. It's an island for the entire city. The more we can get this on people's radar, the better we've done our job. In terms of broadening access to the island and on the island, are there any specific projects we should be looking out for? I think the mayor's plan for enhanced East River Ferry access is a great first step to get New Yorkers thinking about the water and waterborne transportation. Obviously, we are an island so we'd be the main beneficiary of that [laughs]. But with all the waterfront development that's happening in Greenpoint and Williamsburg, all along the Brooklyn waterfront, all of that will help us as more and more people build a relationship with the water, and being an island on the East River Ferry route, it's important that we are part of that conversation. There's so much development, as you said, happening on New York's waterfronts in all five boroughs. Do you see Governors Island setting a model for waterfront development in the city? I'm coming there as a neutral party, not predisposed to any particular uses, but we are starting with relatively neutral territory: We have a million square feet of empty historic buildings, we have the potential for a lot more development on the south side of the island, but there's no magic number, no magic piece that will make it all sing together. To use kind of a difficult term, it's about curating the right types of uses that will make Governors Island even more special. Interview edited and condensed for clarity.
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The Stitch

New engineering study would explore capping and developing a swath of Atlanta’s downtown highway
The private nonprofit Central Atlanta Progress (CAP) is raising $1 million for a detailed engineering study for "The Stitch," a 3/4-mile-long platform and park that would be installed over the congested Downtown Connector highway that runs through Atlanta. According to Atlanta Magazine, CAP already paid $100,000 to the Pasadena, California-based engineering firm Jacobs for an 114-page-long concept plan (whose images are seen here). The Downtown Connector, also known as Interstate 75/85, split Atlanta's downtown and midtown apart when it opened in 1952. The stretch was named among the country's worst traffic choke points by Forbes. The capped area would extend from the Civic Center MARTA station to Piedmont Avenue. The Stitch would reclaim that area; the current proposal includes three mixed use "character zones" with a variety of programs. The first, "Emory Square," would be an urban plaza atop a reimagined MARTA station. The Civic Center bus and train terminal would become the Emory Square station, the centerpiece of a public park. "Peachtree Green," at Peachtree Street and Ralph McGill Boulevard, would become a three-acre park with water features, a restaurant, a pavilion, and a memorial. Finally "Energy Park" would be a mixed-use residential development located next to Georgia Power's headquarters. Energy Park would include lawns, a dog park, a playground, water features, and a pavilion. Other cities, including New YorkToronto, and Philadelphia, also have plans for development on capped rail yards. Additionally, the city of Atlanta is working on the BeltLine, a project to convert the city's old rail corridor into 33 miles of multi-use trails. Four trail segments and six parks are already open, as is affordable housing along the corridor. The Stitch is still in the conceptual phase; a construction schedule and concrete budget have not yet been determined. CAP estimates a $300 million price tag for the project based on recent similar capping projects.
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Daily Dose

Center for Architecture announces “Building of the Day” tours for Archtober
The Center for Architecture in New York City is organizing Building of the Day tours throughout the month of October as part of their yearly Archtober programming. Also known as Architecture and Design Month, the sixth annual edition of Archtober will feature a range of exhibitions, conferences, films, lectures, and more. The Building of the Day is a daily architect-led tour of a New York City building, starting with the Samsung 837 event space in the Meatpacking district. Tickets are now available at the Archtober website. Here is a complete schedule of tours: Oct. 1 Samsung 837 Morris Adjmi Architects; Interiors by Gensler 887 Washington Street, New York, NY 100142 Oct. 2 The Lowline Raad Studio 140 Essex Street, New York 100023 Oct. 3 Ocean Breeze Track and Fieldhouse Sage and Coombe Architects 625 Father Capodanno Boulevard, Staten Island, NY 103054 Oct. 4 David Zwirner Gallery Selldorf Architects 537 West 20th Street, New York, NY 100115 Oct. 5 Turnstyle Architecture Outfit Columbus Circle subway station, New York, NY, 100236 Oct. 6 New York State Pavilion Philip Johnson (1964) Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Flushing, NY 113557 Oct. 7 Metro Pictures Gallery 1100 Architect 519 West 24th Street, New York, NY 100118 Oct. 8 Weeksville Heritage Center Caples Jefferson Architects 158 Buffalo Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 112139 Oct. 9 Bronx Historic Post Office Studio V Architecture 558 Grand Concourse, Bronx, New York 1045110 Oct. 10 Schermerhorn Row Original Architect Unknown 12 Fulton Street, New York, NY 100381 Oct. 11 Manhattan Districts 1/2/5 Garage and Salt Shed Dattner Architects with WXY architecture + urban design 500 Washington Street, New York, NY 10014
Oct. 12 Horizon Media A+I 75 Varick Street, New York, NY 1001313 Oct. 13 New York Public Library – 53rd Street Branch TEN Arquitectos 20 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 1001914 Oct. 14 St. Ann’s Warehouse Marvel Architects 45 Water Street, Brooklyn, NY 112011
Oct. 14 - 16 Open House New York Weekend Oct. 17 Pivot Architecture Workshop 201 West 16th Street, New York, 1001118 Oct. 18 Edible School Yard at PS 7, East Harlem WORKac 160 East 120th Street, New York, NY 1003519 Oct. 19 St. Patrick’s Cathedral James Renwick, Jr. (1910); Murphy Burnham & Buttrick Architects 625 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 1002220 Oct. 20 CRS Studio Clouds Architecture Office 123 4th Avenue, 3rd Floor, New York, NY 1000321 Oct. 21 Museum of the City of New York Joseph H. Freedlander (1932); Ennead Architects (2015) 1220 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 1002922 Oct. 22 Industry City William Higginson (1906) 220 36th Street, Brooklyn, NY 1123223 Oct. 23 Lever House Skidmore, Owings & Merrill 390 Park Avenue, New York, NY 1002224 Oct. 24 520 West 28th Street Zaha Hadid 520 West 28th Street, New York, NY 1000125 Oct. 25 Met Bueuer Marcel Breuer (1966); Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners (2016) 945 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 1002126 Oct. 26 Gould Memorial Library, Bronx Community College Stanford White 2155 University Avenue, Bronx, NY 1045327 Oct. 27 Knowledge Center, Columbia University Mitchell | Giurgola Architects 701 West 168th Street, New York, NY 1003228 Oct. 28 Hudson Yards Various architects Oct. 29 Japan Society Gruzen & Partners 333 West 47th Street, New York, NY 1001730 Oct. 30 The Battery Quennell Rothschild & Partners Battery Park, New York, NY 10004 Oct. 31 Pacific Park: 461 Dean Street SHoP Architects 461 Dean Street, Brooklyn, NY 11217  
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Green Community

A new petition aims to turn 360 unbuildable lots in NYC into green spaces
The New York Restoration Project (NYRP) has launched a petition to turn more than 360 lots deemed unbuildable into parks, gardens, and other green spaces, often in underserved neighborhoods. These lots are considered unusable for building because of their odd size, shape, or proneness to flooding. Rather than leaving them abandoned, the NYRP is offering to transform these patches of land into usable green spaces. They are petitioning the Mayor's office to place this land under their care. Public parks are an incredibly valuable part of a neighborhood, with benefits to quality of life for residents as well as potential for urban farming and use as a community space. Parks are often few and far between in the neighborhoods that need them most, while those in more affluent neighborhoods tend to have more resources available for maintenance. By acquiring this otherwise unusable land from the city and relying on volunteers for labor, the NYRP would be able to provide an essential service to underserved neighborhoods in all five boroughs at a low cost, as well as cleaning up the vacant lots. The NYRP just celebrated the 20th anniversary of its founding by Bette Midler in 1995. The non-profit organization revitalizes neglected parks across the five boroughs, specifically in underserved neighborhoods. In 1999, Midler and the NYRP led a coalition to save 114 community gardens being auctioned off by the city for commercial development. They now maintain 52 of those community gardens with the help of volunteers. The organization also completed their MillionTreesNYC initiative on November 20, 2015, two years ahead of schedule. With the help of the NYC Department of Parks and Recreation, the NYRP planted one million trees across the five boroughs. They also offer free trees for New Yorkers to plant in their yards. Sign the petition here, and find more opportunities to donate or volunteer on the NYRP website.
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Rail Deck Park

City of Toronto to build 21-acre park over downtown railroad tracks
Toronto Mayor John Tory has announced plans to protect 21 acres of downtown real estate for the future Rail Deck Park. The park will be placed on top of an existing rail corridor. According to the city, this may be the last opportunity to create a public park for the city's expanding downtown population. According to the Ontario Ministry of Finance, greater Toronto's population is projected to increase by over 2.8 million, or 42.9 percent, in the next 25 years. The population of downtown Toronto is expected to double. Public improvements like this proposed park take an important step toward preparing the city for a long-term population boom. This announcement comes as part of Toronto's TOCore initiative, which is set up to ease downtown into this more populated future. TOCore is a long-range plan to create infrastructure and amenities to accommodate a significantly higher population density. Among the planned improvements are more options for bike commuting, new community facilities, and, of course, new parks. "Great cities have great parks. As Toronto grows, we need to take bold action to create public space and make sure we build a city that makes future generations proud,” said Mayor Tory in a press release. “This is our last chance to secure a piece of land that could transform the way we experience our city.” The park will be built on what is now Toronto's western rail corridor, on a site that spans from Blue Jays Way to Bathurst Street. No other details are available yet. Toronto will follow in the footsteps of Chicago's Millennium Park, Philadelphia's University City, and Hudson Yards in Manhattan by capping a rail yard to make room for new development.
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Hudson Yards

Watch Diller Scofidio + Renfro and Rockwell Group’s versatile telescopic Shed in action
By 2019, the Hudson Yards on Manhattan's West Side will host The Shed. Half a century ago, chances are most people would have presumed that any mention of a "shed" in the rail yards would be used to house locomotives. Now, that couldn't be farther from the truth. Designed by New York-based Diller Scofidio + Renfro in collaboration with Rockwell Group, The Shed will be home to New York City’s "first newly established 21st-century center for the arts." Rising to six stories and covering 200,000-square-feet, The Shed will comprise a museum, theater/performance space, rehearsal area, and an artists' lab. "We will work with original artists and thinkers from across all art forms and disciplines, to produce and present their new work for the widest range of audiences from NYC and around the world," said The Shed in its mission statement. "We will welcome those artists who take risks, advance their fields, and address the significant issues of our time." "As NYC’s first newly established 21st-century center for the arts, we will benefit from the latest technology, offering powerful opportunities for our artists and our audiences," the mission statement continued. This leads to The Shed's most defining feature: a telescoping shell mounted on rails. Mimicking the great cranes that were once commonplace on the piers stretching into the Hudson River, the shell can support (literally and figuratively) a wide range of activities when it's rolled onto the adjacent plaza. The 20,000 square-foot public plaza can be transformed into an multitude of venues, most notably a 1,250-seat theater (up from its other 500-seater capacity venue). The theater will be created by lifting a screen on one of the main building's upper levels and replacing it with seating. At 120 feet high, the space can be a sound- and temperature-controlled hall that can also cater for an audience of 3,000 members around a performance space. It can also house large-scale artwork. When not covering the plaza, the shell can be used as a canvas for screenings. Watch the telescopic framework in action in the video below:
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YES YES YES YES

NY Islanders may build new arena on Willets Point
The New York Islanders may have a new home at Willets Point, right next to the Mets' Citi Field in Queens. The hockey team now plays at the SHoP-designed Barclays Center, but the 15,700-capacity space is reviled by fans and players alike. Fans have complained of seats with obstructed views (there are 1,500), while players bemoan the low quality of the ice. Home games averaged 13,626 fans, the third lowest turnout in the league. Frank Gehry's proposal had a greater capacity and better sightlines for hockey games, but the scheme was scrapped amid cost-cutting. The team moved to the Barclay's Center after its former owner wasn't able to secure public funding to build a new arena on the site of the Nassau Coliseum, the Islanders' home. The team has been discussing a move for months; it would put them closer to their Long Island fan base, Bloomberg reports. The northern Queens neighborhood the Islanders could call home is a potholed warren of chopshops wedged between Flushing Meadows Corona Park and Flushing Creek. The shops that flourish there provide skilled jobs, and its unpaved streets lined with cars in various states of assembly offer an intriguing detour (and great auto parts discounts) for intrepid visitors. But, like all New York spaces that could be developed to produce a higher return on capital, Willets Point will soon be transformed, one way or another. In 2012, Sterling and Related, Hudson Yards' developer, struck an agreement with the city to convert the neighborhood into a giant soulless shopping mall (uh, retail and entertainment district) to which the Islanders may say YES! YES! YES!