Search results for "philadelphia"

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Plane Talk

Philadelphia airport announces five finalists in landscape redesign competition
Last week, the Philadelphia Horticultural Society, in partnership with the Philadelphia International Airport, announced the five finalists selected to compete in the redesign of the 130-acre landscape surrounding the airport. The competition, announced at the beginning of June, asked landscape architects to conceive of an "Image Maker" landscape that leaves a memorable and lasting impression on the city's visitors. The landscape design would offer a chance to showcase Philadelphia as "America's Garden Capital," as well as create a more sustainable landscape for the major transportation hub. The finalists are: James Corner Field Operations Of High Line (New York City) and Navy Yards (Philadelphia) acclaim, James Corner Field Operations wrote that they intended to create a design "environmentally and horticulturally extraordinary, reflective of the diverse identity of the city, feasible, phase-able and achievable." OLIN The only Philadelphia-based firm of the selection, OLIN has previously designed Bryant Park, revamped the plaza at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art, landscaped Grace Farms in rural Connecticut, and participated in many other high-profile projects. Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects This New York-based firm is known for their work on Edward W. Kane Park at the University of Pennsylvania, and have done extensive work throughout the New York metropolitan region, including the Governors Island Park and public space. The firm was also collaborating with Heatherwick Studio on the recently killed Pier 55 project. West 8 A Dutch firm with offices in New York and Belgium, West 8 is familiar with airport design, having done a similar revamp for Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport in 1992. Phyto Studio A niche firm from Arlington, Virginia, Phyto Studio aims to honor Philadelphia's "gutsy, gritty, and revolutionary spirit" in their design. They have completed small-scale projects for botanical gardens, residential properties, and public infrastructure across the country.

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Each team will receive a stipend of $20,000 to develop a plan and budget for the challenge. The final designs will be showcased at the Philadelphia Horticultural Society's annual Flower Show from March 3 – 11, 2018, at the Pennsylvania Convention Center at 12th and Arch Streets in Philadelphia.  The winning design will then help to raise funds and take further steps in implementing the project.
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More mock-ups

A transparent border wall? Trump administration picks 4 firms for prototypes
Five days after Donald J. Trump took the presidential oath of office, he signed an executive order ordering the construction of a massive border wall, intended to be the cornerstone of his anti-immigration policy as promised throughout his 2016 presidential campaign. Even before the order shifted from rhetoric to reality, architects have been responding to the question of whether they should participate in such a project and what such a massive piece of infrastructure could look like—including Mexican firm Estudio 3.14, which released renderings of a perplexingly aestheticized, Luis Barragán–inspired pink wall to much criticism in October. Now, nearly eight months later, some scattered logistics are falling into place. Last Thursday, U.S. Customs and Border Protection awarded contracts for non-concrete prototype walls to four firms at a sum of about $3.6 million, adding to the four firms already selected to build concrete prototypes. The firms are: Caddell Construction (of Montgomery, Alabama), KWR Construction (of Sierra Vista, Arizona), ELTA North America Inc. (of Annapolis Junction, Maryland), and W. G. Yates & Sons Construction Company (of Philadelphia, Mississippi). Caddell Construction and W. G. Yates were also picked in the previous round of contracts for concrete prototypes. This latest development seems to correlate with Trump's request earlier this summer that the wall be, of all things, transparent. His reasoning? “As horrible as it sounds, when they throw the large sacks of drugs over, and if you have people on the other side of the wall, you don’t see them—they hit you on the head with 60 pounds of stuff? It’s over,” Trump told reporters on July 13. “As crazy as that sounds, you need transparency through that wall.” Sanho Tree, a fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, responded: “Over a 2,000 mile border, I think you’d have a higher chance of getting hit by a meteorite than a bag of drugs.” The Washington Post even took the accusation seriously, spoke to some experts, and discovered that a casual toss like the one Trump described would likely require a catapult or other medieval military device. While Trump the architect may lack a basic understanding of physical dynamics, Trump the politician seems to be unhesitant about carrying through on his promise to build the wall. We await to see how this transparency (or lack thereof) evolves.
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Off Center

Two Philadelphia architects discuss projects beyond Center City
As Philadelphia expands, architects and designers find themselves increasingly working on projects outside of Center City. This is both good and bad news for those in Philly's periphery, which has seen rising rents but also a growth in architectural variation as well. Two architects at Philadelphia-based firms: Scott Erdy, Principal of Erdy McHenry Architecture, and Eric Oskey, a Partner at Moto Designshop, are contributing projects outside of Center City at various scales.   Speaking to The Architect's Newspaper (AN), Scott Erdy spoke of Millennium Hall, a student residence and retail project that was completed in 2009. Here, the end walls of the building are glazed, while the other facades are highly textured, comprised of an array of curved panels which form a composite aluminum rain screen. [intersitial] Such facade projections are seldom seen on student halls where cost limits intricacy. However, Erdy explained that eliminating material waste persuaded the fabricator to go ahead with it. "The folds and side edges are directly related to the size of the raw material fabricated," he said. "We were able to convince NovingerGroup [the fabricators] that it would cost them no more to create than eight inches of relief in the facade as it would be it flat—so long as wasn't wasting any material." "It was a great learning experience for us," he added. "Engaging with the people doing the work for us results in high quality and good price." The relationship with the fabricator was aided by the fact that Erdy McHenry Architecture had worked with them before on another project, Race Street Residence Hall, which was built three years prior. Erdy also spoke about another facade project. At The Piazza at Schmidt’s, a housing complex between Poplar and Fishtown, the facade operates on numerous levels to facilitate views in and out of the building, as well as, according to Erdy, to engage outdoor space as a "social exercise." Erdy elaborated on how the facade came to be. "The skin is basically a window system that was modified with the sub-contractor (GMI)  to make it cost-effective," he said. "The gridded element of that building is a direct expression of the underlying structure." Also speaking to AN, Eric Oskey explained how Moto Designshop has been using layered screens at a residential scale. At the Walnut Estates, a residential complex finished last year, Oskey used a perforated brick wall to form a facade that is offset from the main structure. The white brickwork provided light and privacy to the luxury apartments behind the facade, but was also parted to allow substantial views to a swath of floor-to-ceiling windows. Oskey will be discussing this project and others in further detail at the upcoming Facades+ Conference in Philadelphia. Scott Erdy will also be present to elaborate on the two projects mentioned here, as well as EVO Tower (completed in 2014) and The Radian (completed in 2009). At their panel, "Philadelphia’s Design Trajectories: Growing Beyond Center City," Erdy and Oskey will be joined by Danielle DiLeo Kim, who will discuss how buildings can come together and activate the street level and how facades, as she describes, can act as "identity makers for cities." Facades+AM Philadelphia is being held at the National Museum of American Jewish History on September 25. More information on the conference can be found at am.facadesplus.com. Seating is limited.
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Ward Village

The facade on Honolulu's Ae’o tower will make wind visible
Want to live in Hawaii? The Howard Hughes Corporation is building a 40-story residential tower in Honolulu's Kaka’ako neighborhood. The 3.6-acre community, known as Ward Village, includes Ae’o tower designed by the Seattle office of Bohlin Cywinski Jackson (BCJ), the same firm behind the recently-completed Manetti Shrem Museum at UC Davis. The glass-clad tower is officially titled Ae’o and will sit atop a podium that includes Whole Foods Market. This will provide street level retail, while the tower itself will house 466 units. Tom Kirk, a partner at BCJ, told The Architect's Newspaper (AN) that the "Ae’o tower plays a crucial role in the development of the larger Ward Village project." "Great care was afforded to panoramic vistas within the tower and amenity deck that respect the mauka (mountains) and makai (ocean) views," Kirk said. The placement of project components such as the seventh-floor amenity level and a sky terrace "honor the unique environment and promote Hawaiian lifestyle." To achieve this, BCJ used the Ae'o tower's skin as a device to transmit the island way of life. "The idea of taking a force in nature such as wind, an important element in Hawaiian culture, and abstracting it into a built form was particularly intriguing to us," said Kirk. "Wind cannot be seen, but is felt; we extracted invisible waves of the trade winds around the islands and represented it as 3-D folds in the podium screen. In order to articulate the mass of the tower, view windows, or ‘wings,’ peel off the like wind-swept waves to create a heightened sense of place. This positions the residence living spaces toward the stunning ocean view, while allowing for a profound connection back toward the mountains." The Ae'o tower is due for completion next year. Kirk will speaking about the project in greater detail at the upcoming Facades+ AM conference on September 25 in Philadelphia. There, he will be joined by Jeff Goldstein, a principal at DIGSAU; Petar Mattioni, a partner at KSS Architects; and moderator Jon McCandlish, an associate at KieranTimberlake. Using the Ae'o tower as a precedent, Kirk will join his fellow panelists to discuss how facade performance can encompass more than just technical environmental properties. "I think conversations about envelope performance focus a lot on U-value, or air tightness, or technical environmentally performative aspects," McCandlish told AN. "That is obviously critical and some of the primary criteria we as designers use when considering building facades. However, the idea of performance as a phenomenon, being something that provides layering, texture—these don't have to be additive criteria, but something that works in symbiosis with environmental performance." Facades+AM Philadelphia is being held at the National Museum of American Jewish History. More information on the conference can be found at am.facadesplus.com. Seating is limited.
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Recap

The retail crisis reshaping NYC's streets and AN’s other can’t-miss top posts from this week
Missed some of our articles, Tweets, and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don't sweat it—we've gathered the week's must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Las Vegas gambles its future on sports, conventions, and lesiure As Las Vegas recovers from the Great Recession, city and business leaders are betting that the region’s future lies in a more diverse set of recreational offerings than the ones that made the city famous. Though many of the transformative projects are still in the planning or construction phases, the signs are clear: The boom-and-bust region is moving away from a strictly gambling-focused urbanism toward one more broadly defined by indiscriminate leisure, including sports, large-scale conventions, relaxation, and even traditional mixed-use urbanism. Louis Kahn’s architecture comes home to Philadelphia with major exhibition Last Friday, an exhibition on the late U.S. architect Louis Isadore Kahn opened in Philadelphia, the city where he practiced during the majority of his life. Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture details the architect’s career as well as his journey to the U.S. from the former U.S.S.R. and his early forays into the design world. What’s being done—or not—to save Manhattan’s small businesses from Amazon and big box competition High rent, high taxes, regulations that favor owners over tenants, and plain old capitalism—the incentive for owners to seek their property’s maximum value, and the consumer’s desire to acquire goods at the lowest price—all contribute to the twin plagues of vacancy and the mall-ification (national chains displacing small, local businesses) of Manhattan. Stakeholders, though, disagree on what should be done to solve a growing crisis at street level. Henry Urbach on curating architecture, The Glass House, and what’s next for him The Architect’s Newspaper Editor-in-Chief William Menking sat down with Henry Urbach to discuss Urbach’s long and varied career as a dealer of architecture drawings, curator at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and director of the Philip Johnson Glass House. New renderings revealed as Moynihan Train Hall reaches major construction milestone Governor Andrew Cuomo announced a construction milestone at the Penn-Farley complex, the soon-to-be bigger and (hopefully) better train station on Manhattan’s West Side. This was the last time the James A. Farley Post Office, re-christened as the Moynihan Train Hall, will be open to the public before it’s transformed into a transit hub by SOM.
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AIANYS

AIA New York State announces 2017 Design Awards winners
The American Institute of Architects New York State (AIANYS) has announced the winners of its 49th annual Design Awards. Honoring architects, designers, and planners from New York State as well works completed by others in New York State, the winners will be officially recognized at a reception held on November 10, this year in Albany, New York. AIANYS President Robert E. Stark said, “Demonstrative of what we have come to expect in New York, these buildings are simply amazing.  These structures are an investment in the built environment and add value to the communities they serve. Modern to traditional, preservation to unbuilt, they are remarkable in their own right. I would like to acknowledge all who submitted their projects and congratulate the recipients of these prestigious awards.” The 28 winners have been sorted into nine categories of which can be found below.

Adaptive Reuse & Historic Preservation

St. Ann's Warehouse - Award of Excellence Marvel Architects Brooklyn Read more from AN here. Sagamore Pendry Rec Pier Hotel - Award of Excellence Beatty Harvey Coco Architects Baltimore, MD

Interiors

National September 11 Memorial Museum at the World Trade Center - Award of Merit Davis Brody Bond, LLP New York Read more from AN here.  Bergdorf Goodman - Award of Citation MNA New York Dior Seoul - Award of Citation Peter Marino Architect Seoul, South Korea

Commercial & Industrial: Large Projects

Novartis Oncology Building - Award of Excellence WEISS/MANFREDI East Hanover, NJ Baccarat Hotel & Residences - Award of Merit Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP New York Cummins Indy Distribution Headquarters - Award of Merit Deborah Berke Partners Indianapolis, IN Read more from AN here. 

Commercial & Industrial: Small Projects

Hublot Fifth Avenue - Award of Excellence Peter Marino Architect New York

Institutional

Arizona State University Beus Center for Law and Society - Award of Excellence Ennead Architects Phoenix, AZ Kent State Center for Architecture and Environmental Design - Award of Excellence WEISS/MANFREDI Kent, Ohio Read more from AN here. Center for Character and Leadership Development - Award of Excellence Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP Colorado Springs, CO Read more from AN here. Vassar College Bridge for Laboratory Sciences - Award of Merit Ennead Architects Poughkeepsie, NY Read more from AN here. Onondaga Lakeview Amphitheater - Award of Citation DLR Group | Westlake Reed Leskosky Geddes, NY FBI Biometric Technology Center - Award of Citation Clarksburg, WV Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP New York, NY Perry World House - Award of Citation 1100 Architect Philadelphia Read more from AN here. Theater Renovation Project - Award of Citation Popli Design Group Rochester, NY Duke West Union District Bridge/Pavilion - Award of Citation Architecture Operations D.P.C. Durham, NC

International

Josai i-House Dormitory - Award of Citation  Studio SUMO Togane, Japan Ogden Centre for Fundamental Physics - Award of Citation Studio Libeskind Durham, United Kingdom

Residential, Multifamily

VIA 57 West - Award of Excellence BIG - Bjarke Ingels Group New York Read more from AN here.

Residential, Small

Michigan Lake House - Award of Excellence Desai Chia Architecture Leelanau, MI
Bar House - Award of Merit Audrey Matlock Architect East Hampton, NY Southampton House - Award of Merit Peter Marino Architect Southampton, NY Old Orchard - Award of Citation Blaze Makoid Architecture East Hampton, NY De Maria Pavilion - Award of Citation Gluckman Tang Bridgehampton, NY Read more from AN here.

Unbuilt

Maker Park - Award of Citation STUDIO V Architecture Brooklyn Read more from AN here.

Urban Planning/Design

Southwest Brooklyn - Award of Excellence AECOM Brooklyn Read more from AN here.
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September 25

Matthew Krissel of KieranTimberlake Architects on the coming Facades+ AM Philadelphia
How are computational devices changing the way we approach design? Why is it essential to look at building envelopes as more than just an environmentally-focused skin? These are some of the questions that will be raised at the coming Facades+ AM conference in Philadelphia on September 25. Matthew Krissel, a partner at KieranTimberlake Architects, will be acting as co-chair throughout the conference. Krissel worked with The Architect's Newspaper (AN) on the program for each of the three panels due to take place. "There is a rich history of design here as well as a growing group of young and emerging design practices doing innovative work," Krissel told AN. "At KieranTimberlake Architects, we are seeking continuous improvement of not just what we design and make but also how and why." The first panel will look at how technology is changing the way architects work with facades. From both a performance and poetic perspective, computational design has meant that contemporary designers approach building skins differently. Krissel talked about "augmenting a rich tradition of design processes" and exploring new methods of design. "Beyond simply using computation for expedient production, we see it as a means to expanding the creative potential of the design team." "In panel two, we take on the WHY, expanding the definition of performance to include desire, poetics, and cultural identity [which] elevate the human experience in meaningful ways," said Krissel. The panel will also look at how facades can be both environmentally responsive (and responsible) but also contribute to the phenomenological experience of a building.  The final panel will address, in relation to the previous discussions, what is being done in Philadelphia, the city where KieranTimberlake Architects is based. Surveying Philly buildings of various scales, this discussion will touch on why the design community must see their individual projects as part of a larger urban collective where buildings give back more than they take from society.  "I wanted the conference to take on a similar trajectory and create a larger narrative about the transformative capacity of design and the built environment," Krissel added. "This conference is an opportunity to build that narrative that extends from process to outcomes and do it with a mix of established practices and emerging voices in design." Facades+AM Philadelphia is at the National Museum of American Jewish History September 25th. Information at am.facadesplus.com.
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The Power of Architecture

Louis Kahn's architecture comes home to Philadelphia with major exhibition
Last Friday, an exhibition on the late U.S. architect Louis Isadore Kahn opened in Philadelphia, the city where he practiced during the majority of his life. Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture details the architect's career as well as his journey to the U.S. from the former U.S.S.R. and his early forays into the design world. Kahn was born in 1901 in Pärnu, now in Estonia (formerly under the Governorate of Livonia in the Russian Empire) and left for the U.S. with his family in 1906. His family endured a tough start to life in America. Such was the state of the Schmuilowsky's finances (the surname was later changed to Kahn by his father in 1915) that Kahn could only use charcoal sticks made from burnt sticks to draw; these drawings contributed to a meager income. Kahn continued to use charcoal later in life and these drawings can be found in Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture, along with further artwork created using watercolors and pastels. The exhibition's introduction provides in-depth biographical insight into Kahn's early life, followed by six thematic sections. One section, titled "City," looks at Kahn's time in Philadelphia, a place where he developed as an architect and where he taught architecture at the University of Pennsylvania. "Science," meanwhile, shows examples of how Kahn used structural systems found in nature as a precedent for his work. "Landscape" touches on a similar note, demonstrating the importance Kahn placed on the site and context of his architecture. Likewise, "House" examines how the architect bridged nature and the built environment with the design of dwellings. "Community," on the other hand, details how Kahn used and believed in architecture as a social device, especially for public buildings. Finally, "Eternal Present," exhibits Kahn's study of architectural history, showing this mostly through drawings from his travels to Greece, Italy, and Egypt. Famous quotes from Kahn are interspersed throughout the exhibition's multiple levels. Models also abound, one notable highlight being a twelve-foot-high model of the City Tower Project. Planned for Philly and designed in 1952, the tower was never realized. The exhibit also features interviews with the likes of Renzo Piano, Sou Fujimoto, Peter Zumthor, and Frank Gehry. Louis Kahn: The Power of Architecture will be on show at The Fabric Workshop and Museum for three months, closing on November 5, 2017. After previously being exhibited in Weil am Rhein, Germany and Fort Worth, Texas, this will be the only time it comes to the East Coast. More details on events such as lectures and family-orientated programs surrounding the exhibition can be found here.
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Twenty20

Eight new cricket stadiums could be coming to the U.S. by 2020
"Howzat! Edged and caught at gully trying to drive a dibbly dobbly over silly mid-off." If that made no sense to you, you're not alone. The weird and wonderful game of cricket is still yet to fully catch on in the U.S., but one developer, Jignesh ‘Jay’ Pandya, from Philadelphia, has his mind set on such an agenda, planning eight new stadiums across the country. The Atlanta metro area, The District of Columbia, Florida, Texas, the New York City metro area, Illinois, and California, are the shortlisted regions Pandya is targeting for new cricket teams. In a big step toward realization, he and his firm Global Sports Ventures (GSV) have joined forces with JLL's Sports and Entertainment Group to build eight stadiums in U.S. cities by 2020, forming a new American professional cricket league. For now, the only images that have been released show a mixed-used complex for a site somewhere in Atlanta. The scheme, if built, will include restaurants and residential units. The incentive, however, may be more financial rather than for the love of cricket. GSV has said these eight stadiums will be a $2.4 billion investment, resulting the in the creation of around 17,000 jobs. Each stadium is touted to cost between $70 million and $125 million to build, while specific sites are still being scouted out. Cricket, of course, is played in the U.S. and exhibition matches are hosted on baseball fields, but a professional league would require teams having their own stadiums to avoid congestion and clashing. Furthermore, a cricket field is usually circular. It is bound by rope or markers with a circumference of 1,411 to 1,545 feet—that's about 1.5 times longer than a baseball field. Spectator capacity follows a similar ratio. Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles can hold 56,000, whereas the Melbourne Cricket Ground in Australia has a capacity of 100,024. The real test, however, will be getting people to actually go, and even more pressing will be television coverage and lucrative sponsorship deals. According to 11Alive, a news broadcaster in Atlanta, only 35 percent of viewers said they would not attend a cricket game in the city. This answer, however, may relate to the growing Indian population in the U.S. Already hugely popular in India, Pakistan, and much of South Asia, Pandya believes the immigrant communities from those regions could become a strong base of supporters. Evidence for this lies in the fact that ESPN covers the Indian Premier League (IPL)—a cricket league that is admittedly the world's most popular—with a service costing $29.99 for the 2017 season. “We know our plans are ambitious, and GSV is committed to launching a professional cricket league in the U.S. by 2020,” Pandya told WXIA. The IPL runs a fast-paced 20 over (160 "bowls"—a.k.a. pitches) format of the game, known as "Twenty20." This is the fastest way of playing the game. While the sport is complex, history suggests that changing the rules to placate American audiences does not work. This can be seen most emphatically with soccer in the U.S. as recently as 20 years ago. Pandya's story sounds eerily similar to Jim Paglia's, an entrepreneur who, in 1993, had plans for a new soccer league in the U.S. He proposed 12 new soccer stadiums in American suburbs, initially targeting eight cities: Chicago, St. Louis, Boston, New York, Atlanta, Dallas, Washington, D.C., and Orlando, Florida (the parallels continue). Until then, soccer in America had had a tumultuous time of it, with soccer leagues—both indoor and outdoor—starting and failing. Paglia proposed that each stadium would be part of a larger complex, similar to Pandya's scheme in Atlanta. He also planned a much bigger change, altering the rules to "put a product on the field that would draw more [American] fans." The changes involved dividing the pitch with colored chevrons, limiting player movement, including more than two goals and various goal sizes, and having long-shots scoring more "points" than close-range goals. Further still, players would wear different colored jerseys based on position. "ProZone Soccer," as Paglia called it, failed spectacularly. However, soccer in its standard form based on British "Association Football" is now popular. Since the U.S. hosted the World Cup in 1994 and its women's team has had much success, soccer is now the third most-played team sport in America with more than 24 million playing the game at some level. Crucially, it is well watched too. Numerous broadcasters show many live MLS games and new stadiums are now such a hot topic that a U.S.-focused email newsletter titled "Soccer Stadium Digest," run by American architecture firm Populous, exists. "There is the feeling in the industry that the leading firms are creating a uniquely American style of soccer stadium," a spokesperson for the digest told The Architect's Newspaper in an email last year.  Architecturally speaking, aside from standard tiered seating, cricket grounds boast a unique typology: the cricket pavilion. The pavilion was once (and in many ways still is) a very British typology. Its Victorian ornamentation—a stylistic extension of the railway—is a common feature in any English town and has been emulated across the former colonies in India, Pakistan, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand, and Zimbabwe, all countries where cricket is hugely popular. It can even be found in Philadelphia with McKim, Mead & White's Germantown Cricket Pavilion which still stands today. Cricket in late 19th- and early 20th-century Philadelphia, however, was quickly usurped by lawn tennis. The colonial inflection is a hallmark of the game's roots, going back to Lord's Cricket Ground in London which opened more than 200 years ago, though it's no longer present in modern stadiums. It was at the Lord's Cricket Ground—the supposed "home of cricket"—that a new spaceship-like addition breathed fresh air into the stadium. Jan Kaplický, David Nixon, and Amanda Levete's Future Systems delivered the Lord's Media Center—, which won the RIBA Stirling Prize in 1999. Though that was nearly 20 years ago, that and the more recent addition to the Emirates Old Trafford Cricket Ground in Manchester by BDP Architects suggest there is room for innovation and modernity in cricket stadium design. For Pandya to succeed, he needs time. In the opinion of this author, eight stadiums by 2020 is a tall order, but the marketing spiel of offering Twenty20 cricket by 2020 is indeed catchy. Along with that form of the game, Pandya also needs to bank on the longer versions becoming popular as a result. One day games (40 overs each) and five-day tests, where both teams bat twice, are commonplace. Moreover, even after time is up, the result can still be a draw. He also needs to stick to the rules. Changing the laws of the game? Well, that's just not cricket.
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No Timeline Yet, Though

A James Turrell "Skyspace" pavilion will land at the Philadelphia Museum of Art

A permanent James Turrell pavilion will be coming to the Philadelphia Museum of Art, although critics initially raised questions of its appropriateness, according to the Philadelphia Inquirer.

The City of Philadelphia's Historical Commission approved the installation of the modern pavilion last month, paving a spot for the artist to build on an iconic rocky outcrop behind the museum. The pavilion is being built with Philadelphia-based KSK Architects and is a part of Turrell’s Skyspace series. Every Skyspace varies, but they all feature a proportioned chamber with an aperture in the ceiling and computerized light installations that are meant to evoke meditation and contemplation.

This new pavilion will be a free-standing structure with an opening in the canopy for a framed view of the sky. A twice-daily show at sunrise and sunset with colored lights will be projected onto the underside of the canopy. There are already two other pavilions on the outcrop, and Turrell’s will be the third—a modern, 21st-century piece. It is being paid for by an anonymous donor and is only the second commission the museum has installed (the first being Sol Lewitt’s garden composition).

According to the Philadelphia Inquirer, the pavilion was initially denounced as an “alien spaceship” by one Historical Commission member; a National Park Service official also warned that it could ruin the iconic landscape. (The site overlooks the historic Fairmount Water Works.) After several changes, including blending the canopy more into its environment and obscuring the lights, the pavilion gained approval from both commissions.

Despite initial objections, Dan McCoubrey, head of the commission’s Architectural Committee, said that “it’s a very logical place for a pavilion,” as reported in Plan Philly. “It’s a pavilion that’s contemporary in style. We have a rustic pavilion, a neoclassical pavilion, and now a wonderful contemporary pavilion.”

Inga Saffron's article in the Inquirer pointed out that while the museum did get approval from the Art and Historical Commissions, there was little public engagement process for the pavilion. 

There are more than 80 Skyspace installations across the world, including Turrell's first Philadelphian one in the Chestnut Hill Friends Meeting House. There is no set timeline for the project yet.

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Hoverpin

Announcing a whole new way to discover stories about your city, region, or neighborhood
Have you ever walked by a new construction site and wondered what's being built? Spotted a striking storefront and wanted to know who designed it? Perhaps you'd be alarmed to discover your favorite park is at risk? At The Architect's Newspaper (AN), we're obsessed with covering the most important stories on the built environment, whether it's a mega project or a thoughtful change to a small plaza. Now you can discover our articles based on your location at any given moment. AN has partnered with Hoverpin, a free app that helps users find new people, places, and events, to make this possible. Here's how it works:
  1. Open Facebook's Messenger app on your phone. (If you don't have an iPhone, Messenger is free to download. The app requires you to have a Facebook account.)
  2. In the "Search" bar at the top, type "The Architect's Newspaper."
  3. AN's blue, circular icon should appear—click on it.
  4. Tap "Get Started" for a quick tour, then click "Explore."
  5. Select "Your location"—you'll be asked to send your location. You can adjust your pin on the map if you like. Tap the small, blue arrow once you're ready.
After you send your location, a number of articles will appear, each one relating to a site near you. Each "pin" links to the full article on AN's website. You can also view the project's exact location on a map or share the story others. Curious about a specific city? Just tap "Send a message" then enter the city's name (e.g. Philadelphia). We have over 250 articles available on this Messenger app, so while not every location will have relevant articles, our database grows every day. (A note to our international readers—at the moment, our pins are primarily in the U.S.) Want to explore our archive on your desktop? Visit the Messenger app's desktop version and repeat the steps above; the "Search" bar is at the top left of the page and features a small magnifying glass icon. You can also find all of our "pins" on this easy-to-navigate map. If you'd like to send a regular message through the app, just tap "Contact Us" and we'll respond as quickly as possible. Have questions or comments? Please let us know below or email info[at]archpaper.com!
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Recap

From a threatened Kahn project to the plan to revamp a Philly hub: AN’s can’t-miss top posts from this week
Missed some of our articles, Tweets, and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don't sweat it—we've gathered the week's must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Tesla’s solar roof will cost less than normal roofs While the oil companies struggle to maintain their environmentally disastrous stranglehold on the market and the planet, there are some very realistic technologies that threaten to disrupt the status quo. One of the most dangerous for the oil companies is the Tesla solar roof, an off-the-shelf consumer system of tempered glass tiles. Digital Frank Lloyd Wright catalogue is almost as good as the hardcover In conjunction with the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright: Unpacking the Archive, a new online version of the exhibition catalogue book is now available to preview and purchase. Designers halt work on Staten Island wheel It looks like plans for a giant Ferris wheel on Staten Island have ground to a halt. Court papers reveal the designers, Mammoet-Starneth, left the job in May after a pay dispute with the developer. Now, plans for the New York Wheel are on hold. Philadelphians: How should architects revamp 30th Street Station? As part of Philadelphia’s massive downtown redevelopment efforts, new plans were released on Tuesday for an integrated civic space surrounding 30th Street Station—the third-busiest Amtrak station in the country—by a design team including FXFOWLE, !melk, and ARUP. Amtrak and the project’s team have opened up the renderings for public comment via an online survey. Louis Kahn’s floating concert hall faces demolition

Kahn’s lesser-known and only maritime project, Point Counterpoint II, a 195-foot floating concert hall, could soon face demolition if no potential buyer claims the ship.