Search results for "studio gang"

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Breaking News

U.S. Pavilion announces design teams for 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale
Seven design teams have been selected to represent the United States in the U.S. Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale.  The pavilion's curators, Niall Atkinson, from the University of Chicago; Ann Lui of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and Los Angeles–based critic and curator Mimi Zeiger, selected Dimensions of Citizenship as the theme of this year's exhibition, to engage architecture in the timely question of what it means to be a citizen. According to the curators, the selected teams represent a range of design practices, from the technical to the speculative, but "are united by researched-based methodologies and the drive to use that research to push boundaries—formal, disciplinary, and political.” Each team will examine a different dimension of design and citizenship. Their projects will be placed in dialogue with existing projects by architects and other practitioners, who will be announced later. The selected exhibitors are: Amanda Williams + Andres L. Hernandez (Chicago, IL) This duo brings an artistic and political bent to the Pavilion: both Williams and Hernandez have training in architecture and explore themes related to race, vacancy, and blight in urban landscapes. Williams is most widely known for her work Color(ed) Theoryshown in the 2015 Chicago Architecture Biennale; Hernandez is co-founder of the Revival Arts Collective as well as the founder and director of the Urban Vacancy Research Initiative. DESIGN EARTH (Cambridge, MA) Headed by MIT's Rania Ghosn and El Hadi Jazairy, this design research practice works on the geographies of technological systems from speculation into the problems posed by waste management to the fate of oil-rich landscapes. They're currently at work on an exhibition titled Geostoriesa "manifesto [...] on the environmental imagination presented in architectural projects that engage the planetary scale with a commitment to the drawing as a medium." Diller Scofidio + Renfro (Cambridge, MA) This heavy-hitting firm will already be familiar to many. Best known for their work on the High Line in New York City, The Broad in Los Angeles, and the Institute of Contemporary Art in Chicago, DS+R brings a seasoned, interdisciplinary team to the task. Estudio Teddy Cruz + Fonna Forman (San Diego, CA) This research-based political and architectural practice is comprised of two professors from the University of California, San Diego (USCD): Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman. Over the years, the two have examined issues of informal urbanization, civic infrastructure, and public culture, mostly focused on Latin American cities. They also co-head USCD's Cross-Border initiative, whose mission is "to promote interdisciplinary poverty research and practice in the San Diego-Tijuana border region." Keller Easterling (New Haven, CT) Easterling is a professor at Yale University's School of Architecture and a prolific author of eight books and countless articles. Her most recent publication through Verso, Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Spaceslooks at global infrastructure with the angle that "emerging governmental and corporate forces [are] buried within the concrete and fiber-optics of our modern habitat." SCAPE (New York, NY) Founded and directed by Columbia GSAPP professor Kate Orff, SCAPE is a landscape architecture firm with an eye on large-scale ecological resilience. In its winning entry to the 2014 Rebuild by Design competition, Living BreakwatersSCAPE employed multiple lines of storm surge defense including artificial reefs promoting biodiversity in New York City's heavily polluted harbor. Orff has also published an examination of the chemical corridor between New Orleans and Baton Rouge, Louisiana, in partnership with photographer Richard Misrach – Petrochemical America – and more recently, Toward an Urban Ecology. Studio Gang (Chicago, IL) Architect and MacArthur fellow Jeanne Gang is also well-known for her designs, from her undulating Aqua Tower to her Women's March-inspired exhibit Hive at the National Building Museum. Studio Gang's international work centers on a design principle of "actionable idealism" – the capacity for design to push public awareness of different issues (whether climate change, inequity, or urban decay) and encourage change – which will lend itself well to this year's theme.

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Additionally, Iker Gil – a professor at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC), Director of MAS Studio, and founder of its design journal MAS Context – has been selected as associate curator of the exhibition to join the curatorial team of Atkinson, Lui and Zeiger.
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Instagram Eavesdrop

Studio Gang-Nick Cave collaboration, bouncy castles, and other updates from the architects of Instagram
At The Architect’s Newspaper, we’re plain addicted to Instagram. Sure, we love seeing Brutalist concrete through “Inkwell” or “Ludwig” filters, but there’s also no better place to see where architects are getting their inspiration, how they’re documenting the built environment, and where they’ve traveled of late. Below, we bring you some of the best Instagrams of this past week! (Also, don’t forget to check out our Instagram account here.) The City of Miami, days before Hurricane Irma is projected to make a direct hit, sent out its Fire Rescue Department's emergency recovery fleet to help out victims of Hurricane Harvey in Houston: Elsewhere on the continent, lighter content made it onto the feed. Andrew Kovacs' model for the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial was sighted in the wild, a re-imagination of Sir John Soane's home and museum as a dense, colorful cityscape. Over at the Queens Museum, Never Built New York (curated by AN contributing editor Sam Lubell and Greg Goldin) inflated a recreation of Eliot Noyes' unbuilt Westinghouse Pavilion for the 1964 World's Fair ... as a space-age, noded bouncy castle. Kind of looks like a fidget spinner, no? In the Zuidas neighborhood of Amsterdam, MVRDV has broken ground on Valley, a terraced green-tower mixed-use complex evocative of Stefano Boeri's Vertical Forest in Milan. The project is in collaboration with famed landscape architect Piet Oudolf. Finally, Studio Gang posted a Chicago magazine article on the collaboration between heavyweights Jeanne Gang and Nick Cave for the Navy Pier event opening both the Chicago Expo and the 2017 Chicago Architecture Biennial—but its content are still under wraps.  
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Instagram Eavesdrop

MVRDV creates a “levitating” model, Libeskind teases new memorial, and other updates from the architects of Instagram
At The Architect’s Newspaper, we’re plain addicted to Instagram. Sure, we love seeing Brutalist concrete through “Inkwell” or “Ludwig” filters, but there’s also no better place to see where architects are getting their inspiration, how they’re documenting the built environment, and where they’ve traveled of late. Below, we bring you some of the best Instagrams of this past week! (Also, don’t forget to check out our Instagram account here.) MVRDV created this impressive model that showcases the many levels of the firm's Gaîté-Montparnasse project.
Adjaye Associates proudly displayed the shiny new catalogue for Francis Kéré’s Serpentine Pavilion; Adjaye contributed texts to the book.
Studio Libeskind showcased the sculptural concrete forms of its under-construction National Holocaust Memorial in Ottawa.

National Holocaust Memorial in Ottawa opens in September! #concrete #ontheroadwithsdl #libeskind #architecture

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Florian Idenburg of SO-IL was excited to discover that the firm's Manetti Shrem Museum is now part of the UC Davis logo.
 

New @ucdavis logo includes @manettishrem museum! @solidobjectives @bohlincywinskijackson

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Last but not least, Bureau Spectacular teased an upcoming project that looks like it'll involve more "super furniture."
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Coming 2020

American Museum of Natural History files plans for Gilder Center expansion

The American Museum of Natural History (AMNH) filed plans for its $340 million expansion with the Department of Buildings (DOB) yesterday, an indication that the project is moving forward, according to Real Estate Weekly.

Designed by Chicago-based Studio Gang and officially named the Richard Gilder Center for Science, Education, and Innovation, the project was unanimously approved last year by the Landmarks Preservation Commission (LPC). The 245,000-square-foot, six-story expansion will be erected on the western side of the museum.

The proposed building is noticeably different from the AMNH’s current architectural language of Victorian Gothic, Beaux Arts, and Richardson Romanesque, but the Gilder Center will act as connective tissue for existing exhibition spaces. (The museum's Ennead-designed Rose Center for Earth and Space, while modern, is also styled very differently.) In January, Studio Gang's founding principal, Jeanne Gang, revealed the latest interior designs, which are inspired by ice glaciers and canyons to create an organic theme.

The museum plans to expand its research, educational, and exhibition capacity by building a Butterfly Vivarium, an Invisible Worlds Theater, an insectarium, and new classrooms. The designs also include 30 new circulation connections meant to solve current wayfinding issues at the museum.

While the proposal cleared the LPC and garnered support from other officials and organizations, residents and preservation and park advocates had some reservations due to the building’s encroaching footprint on Theodore Roosevelt Park. But the designers adjusted their plans, and now the building will only take up less than two percent of the 10-acre park.

The Gilder Center is slated to open in 2020, if construction starts imminently.

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Instagram Eavesdrop

From Chicago’s Navy Pier to Iceland’s minimalist beauty: What top architects were posting to Instagram this week
At The Architect's Newspaper, we're plain addicted to Instagram. Sure, we love seeing Brutalist concrete through "Inkwell" or "Ludwig" filters, but there's also no better place to see where architects are getting their inspiration, how they're documenting the built environment, and where they've traveled of late. Below, we bring you some of the best Instagrams of this past week! nARCHITECTS shared this pic of members of the Chicago Multicultural Dance school using the firm's recently-renovated Navy Pier as a stage.
Lorcan O'Herlihy posted this vibrant time lapse of the firm's collaboration with artist Diana Thater; the installation is part of the Artists of Color exhibit at the The Underground Museum in Los Angeles.
Daniel Libeskind shared this photo of the under-construction Modern Art Center in Vilnius; get a peek at what the approximately 33,000-square-foot museum will look like at Libeskind's website.

The Modern Art Center in Vilnius is underway! #ontheroadwithsdl

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Studio Gang Architects revealed its plan to reconnect Memphis, Tennessee with the city's riverfront—get the full story here on AN!
John Pawson is in Iceland and is clearly enjoying its minimalist beauty, as evidenced by several photos that have appeared on his feed recently.

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Last but not least—OMA/AMO took a dive into its archives, posting these images of special resin molds the firm developed for Prada.
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The Big Muddy

Studio Gang envisions the future of Memphis’s Mississippi riverfront
Chicago-based Studio Gang Architects has released an extensive outline envisioning the future of Memphis, Tennessee's Mississippi riverfront. Studio Gang’s Memphis Riverfront Concept is a broad framework spanning six miles of the east bank of the river. Divided into five zones—Fourth Bluff, Mud Island, Tom Lee Park, M.L.K. Park, and Greenbelt Park—the Riverfront Concept is designed to re-link the city’s downtown to the underutilized waterfront. The plan calls for changes, large and small, ranging from new park buildings to major ecological remediation. Many of the changes proposed are meant to build on the things people in Memphis already enjoy about the river. Throughout the design process, Studio Gang worked with the public and the Mayor’s Riverfront Task Force to gauge interest and gain insights into the future role of the river in the city. Based on community suggestions, the plan calls for enhancing views across the river, year-round attractions, additional family spaces, and various bike and pedestrian paths. Picturesque sunsets, barbecue, and the blues—just a few of Memphis's favorite pastimes—were all considered in the plan. For example, Tom Lee Park's new adventure playground and waterfront pavilions aim to be catalysts for the generally quiet park. Currently, the park is primarily programmed for a month-long fair each year. Studio Gang hopes that the Riverfront Concept will make it a year-round destination. The namesake of the park, Tom Lee, is a local African-American hero. Along with the Memphis-based National Civil Rights Museum, the plan proposes a “Civil Rights History Loop.” The riverfront has always been of historical significance to the city. Not only was the riverfront the site of the settlement which eventually became the city, trade along the river was the driving economic force for most of the Memphis's history. The Riverfront Concept hopes to reignite interest in the Mississippi River while reflecting back on its past importance. Among other areas that will see major changes is Mud Island—a peninsula in the river—which has been re-imagined as an Eco Hub. Currently, the area is a cultural center in the city and includes portions of the University of Memphis, as well as the Mississippi River Museum and an outdoor amphitheater. The Riverfront Concept includes learning and research areas, as well as ideas about institutional collaboration. Considering the Mississippi River watershed constitutes nearly 40 percent of the United States surface freshwater, Studio Gang argues that Memphis is an ideal location for freshwater studies. The Memphis Riverfront Concept is meant to be a starting point for much larger changes for the city. Over the past 60 years, Memphis's population has moved further and further east, away from the river. The Riverfront Concept aims to re-center the focus of the city on its historic starting point along the bluffs of the river and provide an expansive shared amenity. To do so, Studio Gang developed three design principles: foster, restore, connect. Each of these principals was constructed through discourse with the public and city officials. The "foster" principle focuses on bringing the public together and encouraging civic pride and appreciation for the river. "Restore" focuses on bringing back native ecological conditions and allowing the public to better understand the river system. The "connect" principle sets goals for bridging the divide between the city and the river, physically and culturally. The entire 140-page Memphis Riverfront Concept is available online for the public to view.
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Opening Today

Studio Gang’s “Hive” was inspired partly by the Washington, D. C. Women’s March
What color is your hive? For the new Hive exhibit at the National Building Museum, architect Jeanne Gang and her firm, Studio Gang, chose two colors, a silver shade for the outer surface and magenta for the underside and the floor. The team selected silver, Gang said, because it was a good complement to the marble columns and walls of the former Pension Building, now home of the museum, which provides the backdrop for the installation that opens July 6. And the magenta? “The magenta was inspired by the Women’s March” in Washington, D. C. last January, Gang said during a press preview this week. “It kind of connects back to that.” The color choice was an aesthetic decision, Gang explained. Besides playing off the marble in the museum, she said, “magenta was so present at the Women’s March, when you saw the hats,” Gang said. “You couldn’t help but be inspired by the color. We wanted to bring that out.” The Women’s March took place on January 21, one day after Donald Trump was inaugurated President of the United States, and drew hundreds of thousands of people to the National Mall. It was also around the time when Studio Gang was starting to plan its Washington exhibit, which became the Hive. The pink hats worn at the Women’s March were conceived as part of an initiative called the Pussyhat Project. It was started by West Coast residents Krista Suh, Jayna Zweiman, and Kat Coyle, who envisioned marchers wearing knitted hats that would make a visual statement about the event while also keeping themselves warm. “If everyone at the march wears a pink hat, the crowd will be a sea of pink, showing that we stand together, united,” they said on their website. Pink is an appropriate color for the hats because it’s associated with femininity and womanhood, the organizers wrote. “Pink is considered a very female color representing caring, compassion, and love—all qualities that have been derided as weak but are actually STRONG. Wearing pink together is a powerful statement that we are unapologetically feminine and we unapologetically stand for women’s rights.” On Monday, Gang led a tour of the Hive, demonstrating some of its acoustic components, including tubulums and wind chimes. Hive is a series of chambers made of 2,578 wound paper tubes, and the tubes have nine different diameters. Visitors can enter the chambers or walk around them to see how they were put together. One chamber, 58 feet high, is the tallest structure ever built inside the museum. Gang said the installation, like much of Studio Gang’s work, represents an effort to create spaces that encourage people to “gather and interact.” She described how the museum has planned a series of programs and activities that make use of the hive, including yoga circles and drum circles. “We’re really hoping to create a community, even if only a temporary community of people who come into the museum,” she said. Hive is the fourth “summer block party” exhibit at the National Building Museum and the first designed by a woman-led team. Other summer exhibits were designed by Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG); Daniel Arsham and Alex Mustonen of Snarkitecture, and James Corner Field Operations. Hive opens July 6 and runs through September 4. The museum is located at 401 F Street N. W. in Washington. Jeanne Gang will give a talk about her firm’s work on Thursday starting at 7 p.m. at the museum.
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Make American Green Again

From sea to shining sea: six projects restoring the U.S.’s ecosystems
As the threat of climate change and sea level rise becomes more pressing, projects looking to save our country’s ecosystems have never been more important. The relationship between water and a city’s landscape has become especially critical for all urbanists (see our water issue, which explored this in-depth). The six projects and proposals listed below aim to repair America's ecosystems and bring us closer to the environment. Unearthing a unique geological ecosystem back to Lexington, Kentucky  After winning a competition to revitalize downtown Lexington, New York–based SCAPE Landscape Architecture decided to celebrate the long-buried limestone landscape that forms the identity of Lexingtonians. With $14.1 million in funding from the U.S Department of Transportation, the project will carve pedestrian and bike paths to create new green spaces and link regional trails. There will also be new freshwater pools—“karst windows,” in reference to naturally occurring formations—to bring Lexington’s water into the open. “Here it’s all about finding a unique identity framed around a cultural and geological history of a place,” said Gena Wirth, SCAPE design principal. “What’s replicable is the multipurpose infrastructure that unites the city, its story, and its systems.” Transforming the Chicago River A clean Chicago River: a dream too good to be true? Ross Barney Architects disagrees, and may well be bringing that vision to life. The firm has dedicated extensive studies on how to transform the South Side neighborhood’s currently polluted river into an urban natural space with amenities that residents need. They even envision a water-taxi stop at the site to provide a direct connection to downtown. Bringing the people back to L.A River  A several-mile segment of the Los Angeles River that runs through Downtown Los Angeles could be getting a makeover soon, with preliminary proposals from AECOM, Gruen Associates, Chee Salette, WSP,  CH2M, Mia Lehrer + Associates (MLA), and Tetra Tech. Each of the seven teams was given a specific segment of the river to reconfigure while keeping in mind future planning approaches, like the potential extension of the Red Line subway to the Arts District. The proposals focus on increasing pedestrian connectivity to the river while also “embracing bold, world-class design,” according to a project website. Rethinking urban waterfronts with Studio Gang's research-based approach Chicago-based Studio Gang Architects’ water ecology projects are programmatically ambitious, but are backed by the firm's extensive research and collaborations with experts often outside of architecture. A study with Milwaukee-based Applied Ecological Services and Edgewater Resources presented a master plan for Milwaukee’s waterfront development. “We’re interested in the intersection between built and natural environments,” said Claire Cahan, design director at Studio Gang. “We seek to understand the natural, cultural, economic conditions far beyond a property line.” Access to Willamette Falls restored The Willamette Falls near Portland, Oregon, is the second-largest waterfall by volume in the United States and has been cut off from nearby downtown Oregon City for over a century. But Snøhetta’s latest proposal aims to restore public access by building a long, sinuous path through the site that culminates in a broad promenade with 360-degree-views. The pathway has also been designed to accommodate for cyclical and historic flood levels and is seismically resilient. Construction is expected to begin in June 2018. Cleaning up Gowanus Canal Plans to transform the long-polluted, abandoned Gowanus Canal in Brooklyn, New York, have been unveiled by non-profit Gowanus Canal Conservancy and SCAPE Landscape Architecture. The Gowanus Lowlands: A Blueprint for NYC’s Next Great Park project outlines a possible park along the waterway, which runs through Park Slope, Cobble Hill, Carroll Gardens, Red Hook, and Gowanus. Performance venues, cafes, and other attractions in between are included, as are mitigation basins, bioswales, and sponge gardens for filtration and wildlife habitation.
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Here Hear

Studio Gang and artist Nick Cave team up for special performance
As details begin to emerge surrounding EXPO Chicago and the Chicago Architecture Biennial, this latest announcement brings together one of Chicago’s favorite artists with one of its favorite architects. Scheduled to debut during EXPO’s vernissage on September 13th, Jeanne Gang and her office Studio Gang Architects have teamed up with artist Nick Cave to produce a new performance piece. Entitled Here Hear, the collaboration will have performers “intersect and respond to a field of dynamic, custom-fabricated objects.” Dressed in Nick Cave’s fantastical "Soundsuits," performers will enact Cave's latest choreographed Up Right Chicago as well as his HEARD performance. All of this will presumably take place in an environment designed by Studio Gang, all to the music of Chicago Jazz musician Kahil El Zabar. “Up Right Chicago is a call to arms, head and heart, with each performance preparing the initiates’ mind, body and spirit to face the forces that stand in the way of selfhood,” said Cave in a press release. “Through movement, ritual and song, performers enter a world they have complete control over, like warriors of their own destiny.” The new Up Right Chicago performance involves ten “initiates”—members of the community—as well as ten “practitioners,” including Cave and his partner Bob Faust. “Like Cave’s works, the objects blur the boundary between audience and performer,” said Gang. “People will engage with the objects, making them performative and expanding the collaboration to the city of Chicago.” After the first performance, the show will be moved to the outdoors to Navy Pier’s Polk Bros Performance Lawn to be performed on September 16th as part of the Chicago Architecture Biennial. EXPO has also hinted that there may be additional performances, saying a full schedule will be released later in the summer.
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Opening July 4

Watch Studio Gang’s “Hive” installation rise at the National Building Museum
Hive, an exhibition by Studio Gang, will be this year's Summer Block Party installation at the National Building Museum. While it opens July 4, you can watch its progress from the comfort of home, courtesy a work zone cam on the Museum's website. Built entirely of more than 2,700 wound paper tubes, the installation features three interconnected, domed chambers that reach 60 feet in height and mimic insect hives. Its tallest dome features an oculus over ten feet in diameter; it will filter in light to create light and shadow patterns. The tubes, which are made out of sustainable material, have a reflective silver exterior and a magenta interior that contrasts sharply with the Museum’s historic 19th-century architecture and Corinthian columns. Hive's form is inspired by other iconic built structures, including Eero Saarinen’s Gateway Arch and Brunelleschi’s Dome at the Florence Cathedral in Italy, as well as natural forms like a spider web. The smaller chambers also feature tubular instruments ranging from simple drum-like tubes to chimes. The installation creates pockets of spaces within the vast Great Hall, allowing different programs to occur within each area. Its modification of sound, light, and scale aims to challenge the way humans interact with spaces and installation sculptures. Hive will go on display from July 4, 2017, to September 4, 2017. Visit nmb.org to find the web cam and for further information on special exhibitions and programs.
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Stacked Odds

Valerio Dewalt Train Associates overcomes NIMBY lawsuit to build expressive tower on Chicago’s South Side

It was a long road from design to construction for Vue53 in the South Side Chicago neighborhood of Hyde Park. The 13-story tower sits along the bustling 53rd Street and has completely changed the character of the area. While change to the busy conduit was inevitable, not everybody was thrilled about it.

Designed by Chicago-based Valerio Dewalt Train Associates, Vue53 was originally scheduled to begin construction in early 2014. A NIMBY lawsuit delayed that start date by nearly one and a half years. The Save 53rd Street advocacy group felt the project was out of scale for the neighborhood and that the zoning change passed by the city, which allowed the tower to go up, was illegal, among other complaints. Opponents donned “Sky, Not Skyscraper” buttons at community meetings. The First District Illinois Appellate Court did not agree. In February 2015 the case was dismissed, permitting the project to continue.

Fast forward two years or so, and Hyde Park has a new 135-foot-tall 267-unit tower. A formally expressive building in glass and concrete, Vue53 comprises a large base and two shifted linear towers. The base rises to the height of the surrounding buildings and contains retail and amenities. These include a compact urban Target store as well as a rooftop terrace, complete with grass and views of the lush park across the street. The building also includes an exercise facility, a business center, and a number of study rooms distributed throughout (for the students the Vue53 is aiming to attract).

The studio, one-bedroom, and two-bedroom units may be a bit smaller than the average being built downtown, but they may also be just right for the intended tenants. The project was in fact initiated by the University of Chicago, just blocks to the south. Yet it is not the amenities, or the battle against upset neighbors, that have set this project apart.

While developers are busy constructing sleek, glassy monolith apartment buildings downtown, Vue53 takes a decidedly more formally daring approach to attracting young renters. Particularly in the upper towers, the project plays a Tetris-like game of solid and void. Together with the shifted relationship of the two towers, the project is more than a glass box on a plinth. The interplay of glass and exposed concrete only exaggerates these moves.

That relationship of glass and concrete carries right into the building’s multi-story lobby and even the units themselves. Cashing in on the trend of rougher unfinished materials, the units are a mix of the exposed concrete and more typical drywall. And though the units may be small, they are all dominated by floor-to-ceiling windows with views either to the north to downtown, or to the south over the picturesque Hyde Park neighborhood.

While Vue53 ran into some stiff opposition in its initial stages, it is by no means alone in the rising skyline of Hyde Park. With multiple new Studio Gang towers in the neighborhood as well, it may seem a bit out of the blue for the area to be receiving so much architectural investment. Yet it should be remembered that, historically, Hyde Park has been one of the most architecturally rich neighborhoods in the city. The University of Chicago alone is a zoo of formal exuberance, from Saarinen to Legorreta. Despite its detractors, Vue53 may be only the beginning of a reenergized architectural scene on the city’s South Side.

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City Within A Classroom

Team led by HKS tapped for UC San Diego mixed-use campus expansion
A team consisting of HKS Architects, Safdie Rabines Architects, and landscape architects OJB was recently selected by the University of California, San Diego to design the university’s new Living and Learning Neighborhood at North Torrey Pines, a forthcoming campus expansion modeled after traditional mixed-use urban forms. The project will provide housing for 2,000 undergraduate students as well as new educational spaces and administrative offices, among other uses. The campus extension will consist of seven new structures ranging between two and ten stories in height. Those new buildings, according to renderings released for the project, will feature blocky, articulated massing with various building geometries clad in traditional materials, including brick and wood panels. A pair of the structures will be 10-stories tall and joined at the midsection by a series of multi-level skybridges. Other structures will be composed of similarly hybridized masses, with traditional housing blocks stacked above office and educational podium structures. The buildings feature a relatively high ratio of exterior glazing, with large swaths of glass curtain walls and punched openings populating each expanse. The buildings will also feature multi-story cutouts and loggia spaces along their facades. Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects, SOM, Kevin Daly Architects, and Kieran Timberlake are currently at work on a multi-phase housing expansion at California State University, Santa Barbara while Chicago-based Studio Gang Architects are working to overhaul and expand the Moore Turnbull Page-designed Kresge College housing complex at University of California, Santa Cruz. University of California, Davis is also planning a large-scale campus expansion. The project at UC San Diego is currently preparing to enter construction this summer and is expected to be completed sometime in 2020.