Search results for "Atlanta"

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Hotlanta Hub

Through its midtown hub, Georgia Tech is priming Atlanta for an influx of technology jobs
Since the earliest days of the technology industry, home has been Silicon Valley. However, there are some signs the tide is turning and heading towards the east. Attempting to capitalize on an impending Atlanta tech boom is The Georgia Institute of Technology, which is due to move into Coda, a mixed-use development in Midtown Atlanta’s Tech Square, in 2019. Designing a building fit for such a brief is John Portman & Associates. The Atlanta-based firm has integrated a 645,000 square feet of office space, a high-performance data center, retail and collaboration space within the development, all while accommodating a former Crum & Forster insurance house that dates back  1927. Pierluca Maffey, a principal at the architecture firm, said the project was "all about" the Italian Renaissance Revival structure that, upon close inspection, is more than just a rudimentary brick building. Atlanta firm Ivey & Crook worked with New York-based Helmle, Corbett & Harrison to design limestone flourishes, notably three arches topped by owls and a lion, which serve as keystones. "It was immediately considered as a jewel," noted Maffey. Though two-thirds of the historic building was lost in 2012, its iconic features remain. Now the former insurance house is being repurposed as a restaurant. Adjacent will be a slightly taller data center which employs chilled beams along with captured greywater deployed in cooling towers to aid temperature control. Furthermore, the center retains some proportions of its older neighbor and also serves as a stepping stone to the larger massing behind it. This glass-clad part of the project is where most of the program is housed. Across 21 floors will be mostly offices, half of which will be for the university, which owns the whole complex, while the rest of the office space is currently being leased out. Retail and conference areas are located on the first two levels. Connecting all these areas will be what Maffey described as a "collaborative core," intended to drive fast-tracked connections through intentional cross-tenant “neighborhoods,” supplemented by "collaborative lounges" on each floor of the building. For the levels occupied by Georgia Tech, a staircase atrium, intersected at every third level, will indicate the university's presence as the building's hub and connect it visually and physically to other tenants. Externally, a glass curtain wall makes up most of the facade. However, this is divided by a band of glass panes that are each individually calibrated, in lieu of lighting studies, to varying levels of translucency and reflectivity to produce a gradient effect that wraps around the building. Pierluca Maffey will be speaking about Coda in greater detail at the upcoming Facades+AM Conference in Atlanta this January 26. He will be on a panel discussing innovations in mixed-use and residential projects in Midtown Atlanta. To find out more, please visit am.facadesplus.com. Seating is limited.
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Cladded Chattanooga

Rehabilitating Lookout Mountain’s historic “Castle in the Clouds”
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Originally built as a resort hotel, Carter Hall is a Tudor style concrete-framed stucco structure on the Covenant College campus outside of Chattanooga, Tennessee. Following a late-1970s recladding project, the landmark building was covered up in an effort to address ongoing moisture and thermal concerns. This rehabilitation project, led by Atlanta-based Lord Aeck Sargent (LAS), uncovers the original building envelope, implementing a number of robust performance overhauls while rediscovering the historic architectural look of this mountaintop resort. The effort has led to the allocation of between $3.5 million and $4 million dollars in historic tax credits. With matching funds from donors, and a phased construction process that allowed the building to remain operational throughout much of the scope of work, the liberal arts college is fully debt free upon the completion of the renovations. The building opened for the 2017-18 academic year following over ten years in planning and construction.
  • Facade Manufacturer Campbellsville Industries, Inc. (copper lantern); KEIM (mineral silicate finish)
  • Architects Lord Aeck Sargent
  • Facade Installer Southern Wall Systems
  • Facade Consultants Uzun + Case (structural engineering); Williamson & Associates, Inc. (building envelope consultant)
  • Location Lookout Mountain, GA
  • Date of Completion 2017
  • System cast-in-place concrete 
  • Products custom mix stucco created following testing of original stucco mix design
Before Covenant College was able to receive tax credits for renovations, Carter Hall had to claim a spot on the National Register of Historic Places, a list maintained by the National Parks Service. To earn this designation, the building had to be “purged” of its 1979 modifications, and converted back to its original state. Beyond facade improvements, this included restoring the original roof and building porches on the north and south ends of the building. LAS utilized extensive historical research, referencing original drawings and photographs of the building throughout the design of the project. The architects developed measured drawings in Building Information Modeling (BIM) software, which served as a foundation for the scope of work. One of the most illustrative examples of this is the crenellated tower of the building where precast concrete was introduced in parapet wall construction for durability considerations due to limited maintenance access. Four vertically-oriented high bay 2x4 LED fixtures with high lumen output were implemented into the custom top of the tower cap– a “lantern”–which was carefully reconstructed from historical drawings and photographs of the project.
One of the most significant challenges of the project, according to David Steele, associate at LAS, was addressing moisture infiltration concerns with the original building envelope. After uncovering the original facade, the architects developed a multi-year, full-scale, two-story mockup process that compared the original assembly of the building against a new proprietary steel stud and stucco wall assembly. The mockups were pressurized to simulate driving rain conditions in an attempt to drive moisture into the assembly. After testing in back-to-back years and inspection throughout seasonal change, the architects were able to prove the original wall assembly met ASTM testing requirements. Previous concerns about leaks in the building were attributed to detailing at original window openings. Window units in the retrofit project paired energy efficiency with a historic look. A thermally-broken aluminum window system with insulated glazing units was specified to match original mulled configurations and divided lite styles. In this regard, the full-scale mockup process ultimately offered the project team invaluable moisture and insulation ASTM testing and feedback for window and wall detailing. The resulting wall system pairs the original clay tile infill wall with an interior furring wall which offers structural backup by means of six-inch steel studs, and an additional insulative layer to the building envelope. The exterior stucco is finished with a mineral-silicate coating that offers at 25 to 30 year lifespan. Durability and low maintenance considerations extend to the roof where a new Ludowici tile roof replaces the original tiles from the same manufacturer, which had endured 90 years of high wind and rain exposure.   The project adds to a portfolio of educational and sustainable projects for the Atlanta-based architecture firm, which touts their design process as offering an “analytical approach to optimizing building performance.” Joshua Gassman, senior associate at Lord Aeck Sargent, will be speaking at the upcoming Facades+ conference in Atlanta. For more details, along with registration info, visit am.facadesplus.com. Gassman will be speaking about Lord Aeck Sargent and Miller Hull Partnership’s plans to deliver the first “Living Building” in the Southeastern United States. The 37,000-square-foot project on Georgia Tech’s campus aims to meet the International Living Future Institute’s rigorous certification. This effort supports LAS’ sustainability commitments as one of the first architecture firms in the country to adopt The 2030 Challenge, an initiative that called on the global building sector to immediately reduce energy usage by 50 percent in new buildings and major renovations in order to avoid hazardous climate change. More information about LAS Living Building efforts can be found here.
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Park Earmark

Atlanta’s Piedmont Park slated for $100 million expansion
Atlanta's premier park is slated for a major upgrade. Late last month, Mayor Kasim Reed announced that the city will kick in $20 million to expand Piedmont Park and the Atlanta Botanical Gardens, which sit just east of the city's Ansely Park neighborhood. The new entrance, envisioned by HGOR, will replace now privately-owned parcels at the park's northern tip near Piedmont Drive NE and Monroe Drive NE. Preliminary renderings and concept sketches depict new outbuildings surrounded by rolling green hills and broad, winding paths, a homage to the park's original Olmsted design. The Atlanta Botanical Gardens and the Piedmont Park Conservancy, a nonprofit that stewards the park, commissioned the Atlanta-based landscape architecture and urban design firm to do the initial renderings. HGOR works for public and private clients, mostly in the South. The expansion will include connections to the Atlanta BeltLine, the city's massive pedestrian and bike path project, plus additional access points to Piedmont Park. Building on the city's $20 million commitment, which includes a $2 million donation from an anonymous donor, Atlanta Committee for Progress board member and Home Depot CFO Carol Tomé is spearheading a funding effort to raise $80 million from private donors to acquire property and pay for the project's design and construction. Despite Atlanta's notorious car-centricity, the city maintains that 64 percent of residents live within a half-mile walk of a park, and the new entrance should up that number even further. To start the process, the City of Atlanta signed Letters of Intent on December 29, 2017 with two property owners at the chosen site, and the city will be conducting community engagement around the design. A city spokesperson said officials are waiting to close the real estate transaction, then fundraise and plan for the expansion. No date for the groundbreaking has been set. Piedmont Park was established in 1834, and primarily served as fairgrounds until the next century. The city commissioned Olmsted Brothers, the firm that John Charles and Frederick Law Jr. inherited from their father, to redesign the park in 1909, and most designs since then, including the 1995 master plan, have honored the Olmsted Brothers' original design intent. For the Bicentennial, Isamu Noguchi designed Playscape, a delightful one-acre spread of swings, slides, and climbing blocks, the same year the city leased land for the Atlanta Botanical Gardens.
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The big atrium in the sky

Atlanta architect and developer John Portman dead at 93
John C. Portman Jr., the Atlanta architect and developer has died at 93. The Georgia Tech–trained architect is credited with developing large downtown projects that revolved around the concept of the the atrium, which he turned into large and dramatic enclosed open spaces surrounded by multiple balconies, hundreds of rooms and capsule elevators rushing vertically from base to upper floors.  Portman—who often developed and partially owned his projects—thought of these megastructures as new downtowns and they were often built in old downtowns that had been decimated by urban renewal and middle class fight. These buildings were often criticized by theorists like William H. Whyte, Mike Davis, Frederic Jameson and others for their lack of context with the historic city, especially the street. However, later in life Portman received praise from multiple sources including Herbert Muschamp, Paul Goldberger and Rem Koolhaas, who praised his work as “a hybrid” of styles and urban relationships. In 2010 Portman’s career was featured at the 2010 Venice Architecture Biennale and more recently, Harvard Dean Moshen Mostafavi used his designs in a GSD studio, sponsored by Portman, to think of “a new architecture, but one with a lineage.” Portman’s first large important project was for the Merchandise Mart (now AmericasMart) in his hometown of Atlanta in 1961 and this led to his design for the nearby multi-block Peachtree Center in 1965 where he maintained his office. His development firm created the multi-block complex at San Francisco's Embarcadero Center,  the Westin Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles 1976, the New York Marriott Marquis in 1985, and the Renaissance Center in Detroit in 1977, whose central tower remained the tallest hotel in the Western Hemisphere until 2013. The Shanghai Centre (1990) was the first of many major projects in China and elsewhere in Asia. Look for a longer appreciation of Portman’s life and career in the next Architect's Newspaper print edition.
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Bay Area Basin

2017 Best of Design Awards for Urban Design
2017 Best of Design Award for Urban Design: India Basin Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Location: San Francisco
Embodying a commitment to sustainable placemaking, the India Basin project proposes the transformation of acres of overgrown former industrial land on the San Francisco Bay into an active waterfront destination and a vibrant, diverse village. The comprehensive design reconnects surrounding communities with the shoreline, cultivates economic opportunities, and provides mixed-income housing. The mixed-use project creates a complete community at a human scale, with all basic services and amenities located within short walking distance. It interweaves parks, plazas, and open space with new pedestrian- and bicycle-friendly connections, as well as buildings for residential, commercial, and community-serving purposes.
The design also embraces the existing ecology of the land. A robust stormwater management strategy links streetscape streams and bioswales (landscape elements that remove silt from runoff water) with a landscape of canals, reservoirs, and wetlands. "This is a significant redevelopment that will affect this part of the city in profound ways. That said, it is an elegant and reasoned plan that integrates nicely with its surroundings." —Matt Shaw, Senior Editor, Architect's Newspaper (juror) Client: Build Inc. Landscape Architect: Bionic Civil Engineer: Sherwood Design Engineers Urban Design and Planning: Gehl Studio
Honorable Mention Project: Atlanta's Park Over GA400 Architects: Rogers Partners and Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects Location: Atlanta
Atlanta’s Park Over GA400 seizes the opportunity to reclaim the GA400 highway void with a 2,500-foot-long public space for community gatherings and public art. A dense cover of native trees over the highway links adjacent canopies and reduces the heat island effect, captures stormwater, and supports native flora and fauna. Honorable Mention  Project: The Reconstruction of Astor Place and Cooper Square Architect: WXY Location: New York The network of streets in and around NYC’s Astor Place and Cooper Square benefitted from configurations that improve the experiential nature of the neighborhood. At the behest of the city’s Department of Transportation, the design team developed a rich pedestrian environment, relieved pedestrian and vehicular congestion, and created custom-designed seating throughout the plazas.
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Open Oculus

Kinetic, retractable petals cap new landmark stadium in Atlanta
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When the Georgia Dome opened in 1992, its Teflon-coated fiberglass fabric roof was considered a modern marvel, stretching more than 395,000 square feet and weighing just 68 pounds. Atlanta's domed stadium hosted an impressive roster of sporting events in its 25 years of use, including three NCAA Men's Final Fours, two decades of SEC championships, two Super Bowls, two NBA seasons and an Olympics. Today, its new sibling, the Mercedes-Benz Stadium, offers perhaps more impressive engineering accomplishments and promises to draw impressive sporting events to the city. Completed in August 2017, the multi-purpose venue is officially the first LEED Platinum-certified professional sports stadium in the United States.
  • Facade Manufacturer Bird Air (ETFE); Canam Structures (steel fabrication); Alpolic (composite metal panels)
  • Architects HOK
  • Facade Installer Bird Air (specialty contractor); HHRM (construction manager); Hannah Solar and Radiance Energy (solar panels)
  • Facade Consultants Buro Happold; Hoberman; EcoWorks Studio (sustainability consultant)
  • Location Atlanta, GA
  • Date of Completion 2017
  • System ETFE roof pillow system; vertical single-layered ETFE film and cable net
  • Products adhered frit ETFE membrane; custom 4-layer ETFE roof pillows; composite metal panels by Alpolic
Among other industry-leading features, Mercedes-Benz Stadium is notable for its kinetic roof structure. While other stadiums with retractable roofs must allocate additional land for the entire roof assembly to open horizontally off the stadium, Mercedes-Benz Stadium offers an innovative space-saving solution by breaking down the geometry of the roof into eight triangular petals which retract in a radial fashion. The petals are composed of three layers of ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) membrane fabricated into air-inflated “pillows” involving more than 143,000 square feet of membrane. The lightweight material was selected for its durability and translucency. Each petal cantilevers approximately 200 feet inwards towards the center of the stadium on 16 secondary trusses which spring from four 720-feet-long primary steel trusses. This primary steel frame spans to concrete “mega-columns.” Nested within the steel framing of the oculus is the world’s largest media wall, an immersive six-foot-tall, 360-degree HD display covering over 63,000 square feet. Unrolled, the video board would stretch three football fields long.   HOK worked with an integrated team of engineers from the start, coordinating information with a robust digital toolset that included digital modeling software. Custom algorithms and parametric modeling tools integrated the stadium’s complex geometrical layout with tens of thousands of pieces of information about the roof structure and its behavior and movement during various load scenarios. The project ultimately generated over 18,000 sheets of steel shop drawings, and during peak fabrication involved 32 factories in the U.S. and Canada making and delivering steel pieces simultaneously. The facade of the project is composed of insulated metal panels and a transparent ETFE facade, which has been marketed as a “window to the city” offering seamless visual connection to the surrounding context. ETFE in the wall assembly was fritted in a range of coverage from 20 percent to 70 percent in response to solar orientation. The composition of the angular wing-like wall panels abstractly reference the stadium’s National Football League team, the Atlanta Falcons. Beyond the Falcons, the stadium flexibly hosts Major League Soccer franchise, and is expandable for major events that the Georgia Dome used to host–Super Bowls, NCAA Final Four Basketball tournaments, FIFA World Cup matches, and major concerts and performances. To accomodate geometric differences between a soccer pitch and football field, lower level seats are retractable and an automated curtain system attached to the roof structure comes down to bring soccer fans close to the pitch. Several impressive planning decisions beyond the facade contributed to the stadium's LEED Platinum certification. Design elements of the building envelope which contributed to the stadium’s LEED Platinum certification include integrated rooftop solar panels, improved daylighting from use of ETFE, and passive cooling benefits from the retractable roof. Gus Drosos, technical principal of HOK's Kansas City office, said the consistency of the attachments of the ETFE system throughout the project and detailing of complex corners were specific successes of the building envelope design that offered valuable insight into working with ETFE and might carry over into future ETFE projects.
Additional insight into the design and construction of Mercedes Benz Stadium will be offered at the upcoming Facades+ Atlanta, where a panel of architects from HOK, EcoWorks Studio, and tvsdesign will deliver presentations in a session titled, "Designing MBS: Secrets of the Mercedes Benz Stadium." For more information on the Facades+ conference series, along with registration information, visit Facades+.
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Moving Music City

Nashville mayor unveils details of $5.2 billion transit plan
Nashville’s Mayor Megan Barry has announced the ballot language for the city's much-anticipated transit referendum. The referendum, which will be voted on in a May 1, 2018 election, would bring a completely new expansive light-rail system to the city. At a cost of $5.2 billion, it would be one of the most ambitious transit plans in the United States, and the largest single project Nashville has ever taken on. The announcement included the full 205-word ballot measure, a broad overview of the proposed referendum. Those projects would “improve and expand its transit services to include: expanded bus service countywide; new transit lines; new light rail and/or rapid bus service along Nashville’s major corridors, including the Northwest Corridor and a connection through downtown Nashville; new neighborhood transit centers; improvements to the Music City Star train service; safety improvements, including sidewalks and pedestrian connections; and system modernization.” The wording also outlines the city’s plan to raise four taxes, in the form of surcharges, to fund the projects. These include, “a sales tax surcharge of 0.5 percent for the first five years, increasing to 1 percent in 2023; a hotel/motel tax surcharge of 0.25 percent for the first five years, increasing to 0.375 in 2023; a 20 percent surcharge on the business/excise tax; and a 20 percent surcharge on the rental car tax.” The next step for the referendum will be gaining the approval from the Metro Council for the ballot language. The plan includes 26 miles of new light rail, additional bus services, and most dramatically, a rail tunnel that will stretch under the downtown 40 to 50 feet below the street level. The 1.8-mile-long, 60-foot-wide tunnel would contain two tracks, and would cost an estimated $900 million. Above ground, five light rail corridors will run to the downtown from all directions in the city. While the rail portion of the project would take until 2032 to complete, the improvements to other parts of the system could be implemented much quicker. In particular, 25 miles of rapid bus transit and “neighborhood transit centers” would connect the bus system to the future rail network. Another aspect of the proposal is reduced or free transit fares for residents living below the federal poverty line. This consideration would help offset the increased sales tax burden on the poor, who are often disproportionately affected by such taxes. If Nashville residents approve the referendum, the city will join the likes of Seattle, Los Angeles, and Atlanta, who have all recently passed extensive transit plans. Critics of these types of plans question the return on investment of the billions of dollars, while proponents argue that they are needed to attract the types of companies and workers 21st-century cities need. An example often cited is the call from proposals for the Amazon HQ2. Amazon specifically requested a robust mass transit system for its workers, a requirement that many midsize cities are unable to meet.
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Home Run Derby

Goooooaal! The best sports architecture of 2017
Soccer fields, ballparks, and football stadiums are all designed to direct attention towards a central spectacle, but that doesn’t mean they all have to follow the same playbook. In a year where cities tried to integrate their stadiums into the surrounding urban fabric, developers and designers demonstrated new ways of thinking about how we imagine sports architecture. Designing for sports means thinking not only about withstanding the elements and the wear and tear of massive crowds, but also make sure the project stands the test of time. 2017 saw stadiums go to new, sometimes weird places, all made possible through creative engineering. Below are some of the best sports architecture projects that AN has written about this year. The Rams' Stadium dapples in the sun The swooping, biomorphic shape of the new L.A. Rams stadium is pierced by 20 million holes. Even though the whole thing is clad in metal panels, the breezy, HKS-designed arena will let fresh air blow through, hopefully solving at least some of the “hellish” conditions of the current coliseum. HOK’s oscillating Georgia Dome replacement A viral story about the Georgia Dome’s failed implosion couldn’t overshadow the opening of its replacement, HOK’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta. Crowned by an iris-shaped roof that can open or close in only nine minutes, the stadium features a host of innovative engineering applications that make it what it is. The multi-use, LEED Platinum certified stadium has certainly been recognized for it, too. The Oakland Raiders are leaving (to) Las Vegas Putting aside the Raiders’ controversial move from Oakland to Las Vegas, the stadium proposed for the team’s new hometown is light, airy, and undeniably football-centric. A step up from the 50-year old concrete coliseum that the Raiders share with the Oakland A’s, the approximately $2 billion project will focus solely on one sport. While the project broke ground just last month and is on track for the NFL’s 2020 season, that means three years of tension between fans while the Raiders are still in Oakland.* Bending it like Beckham in Miami This year new renderings were released for the stadium that soccer star David Beckham hopes will draw a pro-soccer team to Miami. After feedback over an initially bulky design, Populous unveiled plans for an open-air stadium with a soaring superstructure topped by a canopy. The most ground-breaking part of the stadium is that it won’t break ground on any parking lots, encouraging spectators to use the nearby Metrorail, waterways, and even a shuttle service from stadium-owned parking garages that could be built further away. Los Angeles goes European with their latest soccer stadium The Los Angeles Football Club (LAFC) teamed up with Gensler earlier this year to release their plans for a “European-style” soccer stadium where steeply stacked seating arrangements would put fans closer to the field than a traditional layout. Newly-christened as the Banc of California Stadium, the open-air stadium is ensconced around the edges by cavernous glass sections that will both keep viewers dry as well as house the lighting system. A focus on upscale interior finishes might not be the first thing that comes to mind when discussing a soccer stadium, but the LAFC hopes that these restaurants and commercial spaces will draw non-fans to the area as well. Tampa’s new-old skatepark wins over critics Skaters were outraged when Tampa demolished the Bro Bowl, a concrete skatepark that boarders had been tagging since 1978. Part of the city’s redevelopment of the Central Avenue drag, a compromise was reached where an exact replica of the park was built a few hundred feet away, with the original site being turned into a sculpture garden for works portraying prominent members of the African American community. With both Tampa’s African American community and the skaters up in arms at first, both sides have come to embrace the new developments.
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Milking It

Perkins+Will revives old Atlanta Dairies plant as a cultural destination
With its red-and-white milk carton raised proudly along Memorial Drive, the Atlanta Dairies cooperative served Georgia's capital for 60 years. Complete with a Streamline Moderne facade and typographic logo, the cooperative's site had an aura that was deliciously 1950s (it was built just one year prior, in 1949). Like all milk, however, it couldn't stay out in the Southern sun for too long, and today, the site is in a state of dereliction. But this is set to change, through a Perkins+Will–designed scheme, backed by developer Paces Properties, that will reimagine the former plant. The ten-acre lot will soon be home to offices while doubling as a new cultural and entertainment destination in Downtown Atlanta, offering a music venue, retail outlets, cafes, and dining options. The all-encompassing program will feed off bisecting catwalks that span most of the site. While not original to the existing historical building, the catwalks were added when the building became a processing plant. They represent what Erika Kane, project architect at Perkins+Will, described as part of the "building and site’s eclectic evolution over time." Bar the old and damaged metal facade panels that were hanging off the rails, the catwalk structures have been kept in their entirety. A new open-air catwalk will also be installed. Mostly made from exposed steel, the catwalk continues to echo the site's industrial heritage. It will serve as a visual guide, drawing visitors down a large pedestrian corridor to the main courtyard at the heart of the site. "Atlanta Dairies is as much of a landscape architecture project as it is about the buildings," said Kane. "The buildings provide a rich visual framework and programmatic content around these outdoor spaces and the catwalks float above the ground level, linking up the five buildings on the Atlanta Dairies site." Further features of the old building will also be preserved. This includes loading docks, along with the iconic curved brick wall which looks onto Memorial Drive. Maintaining the material precedent set, a brick and steel colonnade complements the loading dock found on the west elevation. Kane described the architects' approach: "This component was not a part of the original building, but again, a fun appendage added over time. For these components, we took more of an adaptive reuse strategy, keeping the uniqueness of the element, but carving into it to keep it porous and in line with the pedestrian-friendly and park-like layout of the site." In addition to this, the original masonry from the loading dock was salvaged with what Perkins+Will called a “truck wash portico.” This will frame outdoor patios for a restaurant, coffee shop, and retail tenants along the facade. "The site is layered in many ways; historically, topographically and programmatically, with new, existing and adaptive reuse structures," Kane continued. "These layers are all connected with these organizing elements. The design of the two entirely new structures on the site, the new four-story office building and music venue uses a contemporary facade language that, together with the second-story addition on the adaptive reuse building, complements the historic Streamline Moderne building." Phase One of the project broke ground in March this year and is headed for completion in late 2018. Erika Kane will be speaking about the project in greater detail at the Atlanta Facades+ Conference on January 26 in 2018. For more information and booking visit am2017atlanta.facadesplus.com. Seating is limited.
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42 Categories

Here are the winners of the 2017 AN Best of Design Awards
The 2017 AN Best of Design Awards was our most successful yet. After expanding the categories to a whopping 42, we got over 800 submissions that made the judging more difficult than ever. Projects in all shapes and sizes came from firms big and small from every corner of the country. While we were surprised by the quantity of submissions, we were not surprised by the quality of the work put forth by our trusty base of architects and designers. There were some telling trends, however. First, the Adaptive Reuse category could have been three times as big as it was, because almost every category received some kind of reuse project. From lofts to retail spaces in disused buildings, the amount of old structures made new is astounding and speaks to larger movements in U.S. architecture. Reclaimed spaces are currently stylish and it is generally better for the environment and local culture when we reintegrate existing structures into their cities. One surprise was that our Northeast Building of the Year, the MASS MoCA renovation by Bruner/Cott Architects, took home the prize. The massive reuse project skillfully renegotiates an old factory, which the jury found to be more successful and important than some other new buildings that might have won in the past. Similarly, for Midwest Building of the Year, we saw a tie between two powerhouse campus projects. Studio Gang’s University of Chicago Campus North Residential Commons and WEISS/MANFREDI’s Kent State Center for Architecture and Environmental Design ignited a strong debate among the jury, and in the end they both proved worthy of the award. It is refreshing to see such good architecture being realized in the Midwest, and it says something about the state of architecture nationwide. Our jury this year was a blast as always, with a very talented group that sparked vigorous discussions and refined the way we look at architecture. It is always good to get more people involved in the conversation, and we are constantly shifting our views on what is relevant and interesting. We hope you enjoy this selection of winners and honorable mentions, and we look forward to hearing from you next year as we keep searching out the best architecture and design to award! William Menking, editor in chief Matt Shaw, senior editor We will be updating this list over the next few days with winner and honorable mention profiles. To see the complete feature, don't miss our 2017 Best of Design Awards issue, out now! 2017 AN Best of Design Awards Building of the Year Midwest Winners (tie) University of Chicago Campus North Residential Commons Studio Gang Chicago Kent State Center For Architecture and Environmental Design WEISS/MANFREDI Architecture/Landscape/Urbanism Kent, Ohio Building of the Year West Winner Point Loma Nazarene University Science Complex Carrier Johnson + CULTURE San Diego, California Building of the Year Northeast Winner The Robert W. Wilson Building at MASS MoCA Bruner/Cott Architects North Adams, Massachusetts Building of the Year Mid-Atlantic Winner Lewis Center for the Arts at Princeton University Steven Holl Architects Princeton, New Jersey Building of the Year Southwest Winner Arizona State University Beus Center for Law and Society Ennead Architects Phoenix Building of the Year Southeast Winner Grove at Grand Bay Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) Coconut Grove, Florida Restoration Winner The Benacerraf House Michael Graves Architecture & Design Princeton, New Jersey Honorable Mentions ROW DTLA Produce Renovation Rios Clementi Hale Studios Los Angeles Aurora St. Charles Senior Housing Weese Langley Weese Architects Aurora, Illinois Adaptive Reuse Winner The Contemporary Austin Jones Center Lewis.Tsurumaki.Lewis Architects Austin, Texas Honorable Mentions New Lab at the Brooklyn Navy Yard Marvel Architects Brooklyn, New York MASS MoCA, The Robert W. Wilson Building Bruner/Cott Architects North Adams, Massachusetts Building Renovation Winner Black House Oza / Sabbeth Architecture Sagaponack, New York Honorable Mentions Billboard Building SHULMAN + ASSOCIATES Miami The Beckoning Path BarlisWedlick Architects Armonk, New York Lighting – Outdoor Winner Longwood Gardens Renovation L’Observatoire International Kennett Square, Pennsylvania Honorable Mentions University of Iowa, Hancher Auditorium Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design Iowa City, Iowa City Point Mall Focus Lighting Brooklyn, New York Lighting – Indoor Winner Second Avenue Subway Domingo Gonzalez Associates New York Honorable Mention Body Factory BFDO Architects New York Civic – Administrative Winner Boston Emergency Medical Services The Galante Architecture Studio Boston Honorable Mentions United States Courthouse, Los Angeles Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Los Angeles San Diego Central Courthouse Skidmore, Owings & Merrill San Diego Civic – Cultural Winner Jan Shrem and Maria Manetti Shrem Museum of Art SO-IL with Bohlin Cywinski Jackson Davis, California Honorable Mention Chrysalis MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY Columbia, Maryland Civic – Educational Winner Elmhurst Community Library Marpillero Pollak Architects Queens, New York Honorable Mentions Lakeview Pantry Wheeler Kearns Architects Chicago University of California, San Diego Jacobs Medical Center CannonDesign La Jolla, California Hospitality Winner Broken Rice Undisclosable Denver Honorable Mention Wilshire Grand Tower Complex AC Martin Los Angeles Office & Retail Winner Albina Yard LEVER Architecture Portland, Oregon Honorable Mentions Cummins Indy Distribution Headquarters Deborah Berke Partners Indianapolis Zurich North America Headquarters Goettsch Partners Schaumburg, Illinois Facade Winner United States Courthouse - Los Angeles Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Los Angeles Honorable Mention University of South Florida, St. Petersburg, Kate Tiedemann College of Business ikon .5 architects, Harvard Jolly Architects St. Petersburg, Florida Green – Residential Winner Casa Querétaro DesignBridge Chicago Honorable Mention Inhabit Solar Cabana Inhabit Solar Queens, New York Green – Civic Winner Princeton University Embodied Computation Lab The Living Princeton, New Jersey Honorable Mention United States Courthouse, Los Angeles Skidmore, Owings & Merrill Los Angeles Infrastructure Winner 10th and Wyandotte Parking Garage BNIM Kansas City, Missouri Interior – Residential Winner Chilmark House Schiller Projects with Lisa Gray of GrayDesign Chilmark, Massachusetts Honorable Mention Capsule Loft Joel Sanders Architect New York Interior – Retail Winner Health Yoga Life BOS|UA Cambridge, Massachusetts Interior – Workplace Winner Memphis Teacher Residency archimania Memphis, Tennessee Honorable Mention RDC-S111 Urban Office Retail Design Collaborative Long Beach, California Landscape – Private Winner LaGrange Landscape Murray Legge Architecture La Grange, Texas Honorable Mention De Maria Garden Gluckman Tang Architects Bridgehampton, New York Landscape – Public Winner Confetti Urbanism Endemic (Clark Thenhaus) San Francisco Honorable Mentions Farnham-Connolly State Park Pavilion Touloukian Touloukian (Pavilion Architect) with Crosby Schlessinger Smallridge (Landscape Architect) Canton, Massachusetts The Meriden Green Milone & MacBroom Meriden, Connecticut Mixed Use Winner North Main Bates Masi + Architects East Hampton, New York Honorable Mention Brickell City Centre Arquitectonica Miami Residential – Multi Unit Winner True North EC3 Detroit Honorable Mentions American Copper Buildings SHoP Architects New York 2510 Temple Tighe Architecture Los Angeles Residential – Single Unit Winner Michigan Lake House Desai Chia Architecture with Environment Architects Leelanau County, Michigan Honorable Mentions Constant Springs Residence Alterstudio Architecture Austin, Texas Upstate Teahouse Tsao & McKown Pound Ridge, New York Urban Design Winner India Basin Skidmore, Owings & Merrill San Francisco Honorable Mentions Atlanta’s Park Over GA400 Rogers Partners and Nelson Byrd Woltz Landscape Architects Atlanta The Reconstruction of Astor Place and Cooper Square WXY New York Small Spaces Winner Five Fields Play Structure Matter Design + FR|SCH Projects Lexington, Massachusetts Honorable Mention Attic Transformer Michael K Chen Architecture New York Unbuilt – Commercial/Civic Winner The Ronald O. Perelman Center at The World Trade Center REX New York Honorable Mention Lima Art Museum (MALI) Young Projects Lima, Peru Unbuilt – Infrastructure Winner The Regional Unified Network ReThink Studio New York Honorable Mention Rogers Partners Galveston Bay, Texas Unbuilt – Landscape Winner Maker Park STUDIO V Architecture Brooklyn, New York Honorable Mentions The Statue of Liberty Museum FXFOWLE Liberty Island, New York Pier 55 Mathews Nielsen Landscape Architects New York Unbuilt – Residential Winner 14 White Street DXA studio with NAVA New York Honorable Mentions Long Island City Oyster Carlos Arnaiz Architects (CAZA) New York Necklace Residence REX Long Island, New York Young Architects Winner mcdowellespinosa architects Charlottesville, Virginia and Brooklyn, New York Honorable Mentions Spiegel Aihara Workshop San Francisco Hana Ishikawa Chicago Temporary Installation Winner Living Picture T+E+A+M Lake Forest, Illinois Honorable Mentions Big Will and Friends Architecture Office Syracuse, New York and Eindhoven, the Netherlands Parallax Gap FreelandBuck Washington, D.C. Representation – Analog Winner Cosmic Metropolis Van Dusen Architects Conceptual Honorable Mention Trash Peaks DESIGN EARTH 2017 Seoul Biennale of Architecture and Urbanism Architectural Representations – Digital Winner Three Projects SPORTS New York Honorable Mentions MIDDLE EARTH: DIORAMAS FOR THE PLANET NEMESTUDIO Conceptual New Cadavre Exquis NEMESTUDIO Conceptual Digital Fabrication Winner Under Magnitude MARC FORNES / THEVERYMANY Orlando, Florida Honorable Mentions Flotsam & Jetsam SHoP Architects Miami As We Are Matthew Mohr Studios Columbus, Ohio New Materials Winner Indiana Hardwood Cross-Laminated Timber IKD Columbus, Indiana Research Winner Snapping Facade Jin Young Song (University at Buffalo, Dioinno Architecture) Conceptual Honorable Mention The Framework Project LEVER Architecture with the Framework Project Portland, Oregon Student Work Winner Preston Outdoor Education Station el dorado inc Kansas State University, College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Elmdale, Kansas Honorable Mentions Waldo Duplex el dorado inc Kansas State University, College of Architecture, Planning, and Design Kansas City, Missouri Big Vic and the Blue Furret Rajah Bose California College of the Arts San Francisco, California A special thanks to our 2017 AN Best of Design Awards Jury! Morris Adjmi Principal, Morris Adjmi Architects Emily Bauer Landscape Architect, Bjarke Ingels Group Eric Bunge Principal, nARCHITECTS Matt Shaw, Senior Editor, The Architect’s Newspaper Nathaniel Stanton Principal, Craft Engineer Studio Irene Sunwoo Director of Exhibitions, GSAPP
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Photo Finish

HOK’s oscillating Atlanta stadium is now LEED Platinum certified
HOK’s Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, Georgia, just became the first LEED Platinum–certified professional sports stadium in the world. The $1.5 billion project opened in August and is best known for its operable, aperture-shaped roof, but HOK and Buro Happold Engineering have also integrated a suite of sustainability features into the base design of the stadium. Replacing the now-defunct Georgia Dome as the home of the Atlanta Falcons, the 2-million-square-foot, 71,000-seat Mercedes-Benz Stadium is styled after the Roman Pantheon, as the entire arena is centered around a domed oculus. Because the building is multi-use—designed for holding football, soccer, and basketball games—and because Falcons owner Arthur Blank had wanted to build what he described as an “iconic stadium” with a retractable roof, a watertight aperture was designed for the roof. Comprising eight 200-foot-long, 450-ton blades clad in Ethylene Tetrafluoroethylene (EFTE) film, the roof’s semi-transparent iris is capable of opening and closing in only nine minutes. Because every petal needs to swing into place at a different speed, not rotate like a true aperture, the roof uses an algorithm to judge how much counter-balance is needed while the blades are cantilevering out over the field. Reinforcing the centralized focus of the design is a 350-ton, six-story, ring-shaped “Halo Board” seated inside the oculus itself that’s viewable from every seat and angle. Outside, the stadium’s base is a wall-to-ceiling glass curtain wall meant to give uninterrupted views of the surrounding city as fans make their way to their seats. Eight steel and glass “leaves” radiate out from the aperture at the top of the stadium and drape down over the glass at the bottom, referencing the swooping wings in the Falcons’ logo. According to HOK, Mercedes-Benz Stadium’s LEED score of 88 points is the highest of any sports venue. Through the use of its 4,000 photovoltaic panels, the stadium produces enough solar electricity to power nine football games, or 13 soccer games. By using water-conserving fixtures and infrastructure adjustments, the building uses up to 47 percent less water than a building of comparable size. The location was also key, as the stadium is located between three MARTA bus lines and next to a forthcoming 13-acre green space that fans can use between games. The site also features electrical vehicle charging stations, bike parking, and new pedestrian paths. An incredibly complex project that required coordination between architects and structural engineers at every step of the way, the stadium still isn’t fully operational even though it’s in use. Work on the roof is still ongoing, and engineers hope to have the aperture fully functional by the time Atlanta hosts the Final Four basketball tournament in 2020. The stadium's innovative high performance facade will also be discussed more in-depth at Facade Plus's Atlanta conference in January 2018.
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Upping the Ante

Las Vegas supersized convention center expansion approved
The already-giant Las Vegas Convention Center (LVCC) is about to get even bigger, thanks to an expansion by Atlanta's tvsdesign. This week, the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority Board of Directors approved tvsdesign to spearhead the $860 million addition, and after renovations, the exhibition hall will be North America's second-largest (top honors go to Chicago's McCormick Place). The firm is collaborating with Henderson, Nevada's TSK Architects, as well as Las Vegas's Simpson Coulter Studio, Carpenter Sellers Del Gatto Architects and KME Architects on the 1.4-million-square-foot design. The megaproject will proceed in phases. This phase, the LVCC District Expansion, is expected to be finished by the end of 2020, while a subsequent renovation of the existing 3.2-million-square-foot convention center will wrap in 2023. "What gets us out of bed in the morning is doing big, complex projects that are important and have a meaningful impact on people’s lives," said Rob Svedberg, tvsdesign principal, in a statement. "The Las Vegas Convention Center expansion is just that: big, intricate and positioned to deliver a positive impact on many lives. We are thrilled about the opportunity to create an iconic design for the world’s greatest convention city." tvsdesign is part of the design-build team selected this year to realize the $1.5 billion expansion of the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in Manhattan. The firm also worked on the $585 million Music City Center in Nashville. Last year, 22,000 meetings, conventions and trade shows were held in Las Vegas. When it's complete, the larger LVCC is expected to attract 2 million visitors per year.