Search results for "Brooklyn"

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Hitting Benchwallmarks

Governor Cuomo presents plan to prevent L train tunnel closure
At a 12:45 p.m. press conference Thursday afternoon, Governor Andrew Cuomo unveiled plans to prevent the 15-month-long L train shutdown that was set to begin on April 27. Seated between a panel of engineering experts from Cornell and Columbia Universities and representatives from the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA), Cuomo repeatedly touted the innovative nature of the proposed solution—as well as his success in building the new Mario Cuomo Bridge. After Hurricane Sandy struck New York City in 2012, the Canarsie Tunnel that runs between Manhattan and Brooklyn was flooded with salt water. The L line, which ferries 250,000 riders a day between the two boroughs, still requires extensive repairs to fix the corrosion caused by the storm. The concrete bench walls lining the tunnel were damaged, as were the wires and other electrical components embedded behind them. The MTA was scrambling to implement alternatives for commuters, including turning an east-west stretch of Manhattan's 14th Street into a dedicated bus lane, but it now looks like the planning was for naught. The new scheme presented by Cuomo, a joint effort between the governor’s engineering team, WSP, Jacobs Engineering Group, and the MTA, restricts the slowdowns to nights and weekends. Instead of removing and rebuilding the tunnel’s bench wall, and the components behind it, only the most unstable sections will be removed. Then, a fiberglass wrapper will be bonded to the tunnel’s walls via adhesive polymers and mechanical fasteners. A new cable system will be run on the inside of the tunnel via a racking system and the old wiring will be abandoned. New walkways will be added to the areas where the bench walls have already been or will be removed. Finally, a “smart sensor” network of fiber-optic cables will be installed to monitor the bench wall’s movement and alert the MTA to potential maintenance issues. Governor Cuomo hailed the move as innovative, saying that this cable racking system was commonplace in European and Chinese rail projects but that this would be the first application in America. He also claimed that the fiberglass wrapping would be a “structural fix”, not just a Band-Aid, and that it was strong enough to hold the new Mario Cuomo bridge together. To increase the system’s sustainability, floodgates would be added to the First Avenue station in Manhattan and the Bedford Avenue station in Brooklyn. After the presentation was complete, Cuomo passed the microphone to MTA acting chairman Fernando Ferrer, who said that the agency would be implementing the changes immediately. Still, skepticism over whether the MTA would be able to implement the plan quickly bubbled up from the members of the press in attendance and on social media. Because this method of tunnel repair has thus far been untested in the U.S., the question of whether the MTA would be able to find skilled workers to implement the plan was raised. Cuomo, for the most part, brushed the concerns off, claiming that each piece of the repair scheme has been conducted individually before. If the L train repair plan proceeds as scheduled, one track at a time will be shut down on nights and weekends for up to 20 months. To offset the decrease in service, the MTA plans on increasing service on several other train lines, including the 7 and G.
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Some New, Some Old

Francis Kéré, Office Kovacs, and others tapped for 2019 Coachella installations
Francis Kéré, Office Kovacs, NEWSUBSTANCE, and other artists, architects, and designers have been chosen to bring creative and immersive installations to the Coachella Arts and Music Festival later this year. In years past, the festival has hosted an eclectic cohort of rising and established designers and artists, including Los Angeles–based Bureau Spectacular, Italian artist Edoardo Tresoldi, Nigerian-born, Brooklyn-based artist Olalekan Jeyifous, along with many others. This year’s slate of creatives boasts several new and returning acts, including artist Robert Bose, whose kinetic balloon sculpture was present at the 2017 festival. United Kingdom–based installation artists NEWSUBSTANCE are also making a return this year. Their 2018 installation, Spectra, consisted of a seven-story sloping ramp tower wrapped in polychromic panels. Los Angeles–based Do Lab will also be participating again this year. The professional music festival venue creators have previously created installations for The Great Convergence at the Great Pyramids at Giza in Egypt, the Virgin Music Festival, and other large-scale events and music festivals around the globe. In 2018, Do Lab created a tent-like performance venue for Coachella that was fashioned out of yellow and blue triangulated panels. https://www.instagram.com/p/BsKcG6KHeJD/?utm_source=ig_web_button_share_sheet Absurdist art duo Dedo Vabo will also be returning to Coachella this year. In 2018, the team brought Corporate Office, a multi-story, LED-wrapped diorama to the festival. This year’s first-time acts are due to bring a breath of fresh air to the festival. Los Angeles–based Office Kovacs, helmed by Andrew Kovacs and Erin K. Wright, will be a part of the festival for the first time this year. Office Kovacs recently completed an installation at Woodbury University’s Wedge Gallery and also received an honorable mention designation for the Lima Art Museum New Contemporary Art Wing competition in 2016. Architect Francis Kéré will also be exhibiting his work at the festival for the first time in 2019. Kéré is currently working on a musical reflection pavilion for the Tippet Rise Art Center in Montana, among several other international projects. DKLA Design, a group of designers known for their life-like animal and abstract public art sculptures around the country, will bring their stand-alone pieces to this year’s festival, as well. Experiential designers Poetic Kinetics will bring one of their iconic works to Coachella. In 2016, the team partnered with the Architectural Association Visiting School Los Angeles (AAVSLA) summer program, the City of Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks, and the arts organization NOW Art L.A. to create Liquid Shard, a mesmerizing, iridescent wind-driven sculpture for L.A.’s Pershing Square park. Local artists Sofia Enriquez and Raices Cultura will also create installations for the festival, which takes place April 12-14 and again April 19-21. For more information, see the festival's website.
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DUMBO Gets BIG-ger

BIG shows off its new full-block office in DUMBO
Bjarke Ingels Group (BIG) has completed its move to Brooklyn, setting up shop in a new 50,000-square-foot office space only a stone’s throw from the Brooklyn Bridge. BIG has consolidated its 250-person office onto a single full-block floor near the top of 45 Main Street in DUMBO. Designed by BIG’s in-house interiors team, the office is full of furniture and lighting fixtures from the Danish design firm and frequent BIG collaborator KiBiSi. The move to a larger office meant that the studio was able to quadruple the space allocated to its two fabrication and assembly spaces. Completed pieces can then move to an extra-height, skylight-lit room for displaying large-scale models and mockup furniture. A gallery on the south side of the floor connects the office’s eastern and western wings. The chairs inside of the glass-enclosed conference room are color-coded in reference to the studio’s monograph Hot to Cold and range from mild to vibrant, a flourish repeated in the perimeter-lining bookshelves. Rounding out the new office’s perks is a private roof deck that the studio can use for events and conference meetings, which is separate from the building's 9,500-square-foot green roof designed by James Corner Field Operations.
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A Political Statement

Studio Vural designs memorial to slain journalist Jamal Khashoggi
A Turkish-American architect has designed a speculative funeral memorial for the late Jamal Khashoggi. In an immersive sketch, Selim Vural, owner of the Brooklyn-based Studio Vural, envisioned a traveling memorial for the Washington Post journalist who was allegedly murdered while visiting the Saudi Consulate in Istanbul this October. Vural places the memorial in front of the White House in Washington, D.C., as a nod to President Donald Trump’s business links with the suspected murderer, Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman of Saudi Arabia. An axonometric view of the memorial shows the design arranged in the outline of a keffiyeh, traditional Arab headgear, overtop green grass. “Our project addresses not only the criminal acts of the president but also the lack of closure of Khashoggi’s death due to his missing body,” Vural said in a statement. “The idea of a hybrid funeral/memorial arose from this duality.” Made with a pattern of polished red sheet metal, the layout references the specific keffiyeh that the Crown Prince wears. Layered on top of the metal are concrete planters, funeral flowers, and a black marble “coffin” (also a planter), rounding out a makeshift memorial that pays homage to a man who can’t be properly mourned or buried due to his missing body. “Although all planters can be interpreted as coffins of possibly other tortured journalists, this one is special, this is for Jamal,” explained Vural, “this is for his family, for his immortality, and has a sense of permanence.” In the renderings, Vural depicts the Crown Prince walking with Trump, observing the memorial which sits in front of the president’s home. The pointed planters lie in stark contrast to the round and skinny colonnade that accents the White House’s southern central facade. According to the architect, this funeral memorial aims to “bring serenity, calm, and closure to the violence and secrecy of the act” of Khashoggi's killing. It’s designed for him, but for all journalists—“heroes with pens,” as Vural noted. Last week the Committee to Protect Journalists released a report that found that at least 53 journalists had been killed worldwide in 2018. Since Khashoggi’s gruesome death was one of the most high-profile murders of the year, it’s sparked international outrage and caused potential trade tension between the United States and Saudi Arabia. The latest headlines detail that Trump doesn’t plan to punish the country for the crime in an attempt to maintain the country's long-held support for America’s foreign policy priorities, but growing global and domestic opposition to the Crown Prince may soon force Trump to change his outlook.
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Stacks on Stacks

Take a look behind the construction of the tallest modular hotel in the U.S.
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Modular construction is gaining steam in New York City, with the technique being utilized for new projects ranging from affordable housing to academic facilities. In September 2018, modular technology reached a new height with the tallest modular hotel in the United States, the 21-story citizenM New York Bowery located in Manhattan. For the modular units, Concrete Architectural Associates, Stephen B. Jacobs Group Architects and Planners, and DeSimone Consulting Engineers reached out to Polish manufacturers Polcom Modular, and Aluprof S.A.  The units, which measure 48 feet by 8 feet by 9 feet and incorporate two hotel rooms and a central corridor (following a pattern of guestroom-corridor-guestroom), were specifically designed to navigate the street width of New York City. Each module was assembled with the street-facing facade included.
  • Facade Manufacturer Aluprof S.A., Poland Polcom Modular
  • Architects Concrete Architectural Associates & Stephen B. Jacobs Group Architects and Planners
  • Facade Installer Architectural Building Services
  • Facade Consultants DeSimone Consulting Engineers                  Gilsanz Murray Steficek LLP
  • Location New York
  • Date of Completion September 2018
  • System Mullion/transom captured system with hopper tilt-in windows
  • Products Aluprof MB-SR50 Hi; MB-60l
Following fabrication, the 210 modular units were transported hundreds of miles from the manufacturing facilities in Goleszów, Poland to the northern port city of Gdańsk where they began the second leg of their trip to New York’s Red Hook Terminal. From Brooklyn, a convoy of flatbed trucks transported the units across the East River to the construction site. The project began with the construction of a four-story concrete base, topped with a 36-inch-thick slab that spans up to 38 feet. This podium, which houses larger amenity spaces below, serves as a transfer slab to support the modular pods above. While the bulk of the citizenM New York Bowery hotel is composed of modular units, there are certain structural elements that span the building’s height. Prior to the craning in of prefabricated components, the construction team poured a full-height concrete structural core along the sites southwest corner and a sheer wall to the north. These concrete structural elements are the primary lateral system for the tower, with the sheer wall largely preventing the modular units from twisting. "Diagonal strap bracing on the module ceiling acted as the floor diaphragm to transfer the floor lateral loads back to the sheer walls," said DeSimone Consulting Engineers Managing Principal Borys Hayda, "the sheer wall's steel connection plates were bolted into the module ceilings and the female end of a Halfen stud embedded into the concrete structure." Once on site, the modules were lifted by crane and stacked module-to-module, each tied to the one directly below by bolted connections. According to DeSimone Engineers, "countersunk bolts were typically used for the diaphragm connections to prevent boltheads from interfering with the bearing of the module above." During construction, the prefabricated units were effectively cocooned within a watertight membrane, with the central portion later being cut out for the hotel’s corridors. After a brief learning curve at the start of the project, the construction team was capable of installing one floor of modular units per week. The top two floors of the tower are framed by structural steel, allowing for larger amenity spaces.
 
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Pay Attention

Stop asking where all the female architects are; we’re right here
In 2014, a year after I graduated from architecture school, I read Karrie Jacobs’s Fast Company piece on Nicole Dosso, “The Tallest Tower in the U.S. is Being Built by a Woman.” A perfect title, a perfect piece. In it, Jacobs wasn’t describing Dosso as a “female architect” or as a “woman in architecture.” She simply stated that the tallest tower is being built by a woman, period. As a 23-year-old female starting out in her career, I was energized and in awe of Dosso, and my peers who weren’t in architecture were too. It was a breath of fresh air, a moment of strength. Another example is a recent New York Times article titled, “Architecture is No Longer Just a Gentlemen’s Profession.” Precisely. These are the types of headlines and stories we need. Last Saturday’s New York Times op-ed, “Where Are All the Female Architects?” was not titled to advance our cause. The piece did talk about redefining success since there’s often a limited view of what being an architect means. But its headline, along with a slew of others lately asking where are the female architects, adds to the misleading narrative that there are none out there. It’s a negative story to suggest because there are truly so many. It’s time to change this narrative. I no longer want to hear people asking, “Where are all the women architects?” or saying, “I can’t name five female architects.” I’ve published interviews with 50 women on my platform Madame Architect who build, design, or otherwise advance the practice of architecture, and I’ve spoken to even more. We need to listen to them, write about them, amplify them, and support them in combating the issues our industry faces in order to change this situation.

Instead of asking “Where are these women?” start writing about them and telling their unique stories.

Yes, we need to call out the systemic issues in the industry that are perpetuated time and time again and prevent many women from rising through the ranks. They need to be discussed and approached thoughtfully. But why not show what the redefinition of success looks like by writing about the myriad women who are doing exceptional, sensitive, and important work while simultaneously running businesses, acting as caregivers, and making time to mentor? To me, that is the beginning of change. Instead of asking “Where are these women?” start writing about them and telling their unique stories. Show their successes, their reinventions of practices, and how they forged their own paths. Take Andrea Simitch, who leads the nation’s top-ranked undergraduate architecture program, or Nina Freedman, the former “secret wing” to Shigeru Ban and founder of Dreamland Creative Projects. There is also Sylvia Smith, senior partner at FXCollaborative, who started and oversees the firm’s award-winning cultural and educational practice, as well as Sandra McKee, who spearheaded Rafael Viñoly’s Tokyo International Forum but now owns her own international studio and hosts ArchiteXX’s mentorship sessions. Younger women are also emerging as leaders in the field. Elyse Marks, a restoration architect, rope-access technician, and marathoner, defies gender norms every day while hanging hundreds of feet in the air, while Alda Ly, one of the co-founders of MASS Design Group, runs her own practice working with entrepreneurs and startups like The Wing. Danei Cesario is raising two girls while traveling to speak on industry equity and diversity, while Isabel Oyuela-Bonzani introduces architecture to high school students.

There are clearly many women who are architects, but the yardstick for evaluating good architecture and success is shortsighted.

There are also countless women I’ve met who may not build, but advance the practice and advocate for the value of architecture and architects, like critic Alexandra Lange, public relations expert Tami Hausman, strategist Ashley Bryan, and activist Jessica Myers. These women show there are different types of success at all levels that deserve to be celebrated and talked about. There are clearly many women who are architects, but the yardstick for evaluating good architecture and success is shortsighted. Good architecture now has a broader definition, and we can be more inclusive in showcasing the architecture that addresses the issues facing society today. I should also note that the women I’ve called out in this article are all based in New York. Since I live and work full-time here, these are the architects with whom I can have meaningful, intimate, face-to-face conversations. Of course, I am trying to profile more women located elsewhere in the country and around the world. But just imagine: If there are so many unique stories held within a singular city, there must be countless architects out there doing fascinating work that we need to acknowledge. In last week’s New York Times op-ed, writer Allison Arieff quoted Caroline James, a graduate of Harvard’s architecture program and founder of the advocacy group Design for Equality. James told Arieff that it’s “time to ID the problem and what we need to do moving forward” by giving women the tools they can use to succeed, such as mentorship and access to information. This is exactly my goal for Madame Architect, and the same spirit drives other organizations like ArchiteXX, Rebel Architette, Equity by Design, and Girl Uninterrupted. We should also start early by speaking and listening to students, asking them what questions they have, what resources they’ll need, and what kinds of mentors they want. When I was studying at Cornell, I read Toshiko Mori’s newly-released monograph and remember focusing on the following words which have since fueled my attitude toward my career: “Architects cannot be defeated by disappointments. The profession requires mental strength, good health, and especially a strong stomach. An unlimited amount of optimism, a healthy dose of idealism, and high energy and high spirits help us to persevere through difficult circumstances.” This industry is tough and we need to infuse it with this kind of motivation. We need a strong start in 2019 where we can mobilize, spread knowledge, build community, and support men and women alike within architecture. I don’t believe this is the only solution, but this moment is a new beginning. So let’s write about these women—these architects—in the way that Karrie wrote about Nicole. We are not missing and we will no longer be hidden. Julia Gamolina is the founder and editor of Madame Architect. She also currently handles business development at FXCollaborative.
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Virtual Victory

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Digital Fabrication
2018 Best of Design Award for Digital Fabrication: 260 Kent Designer: COOKFOX Architects Location: Brooklyn, New York

Slated to be the tallest tower in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, 260 Kent by COOKFOX Architects was designed using an innovative precast exterior concept inspired by the molecular structure of sugar crystals. In a unique collaboration between the architect, developer, and Gate Precast, the same BIM model that was used to design the facade and create early scaled 3D-printed models was utilized to print molds for the precast panels. When complete, the facade is intended to act as a shading element. Opening in fall 2019, the 42-story tower will join the already open 325 Kent and Domino Park as the latest edition to the Domino Sugar waterfront redevelopment project.

Honorable Mentions Project Name: A.V. Bath House Designer: Facilities Design Group Location: Custer, Michigan Project Name: MARS Pavilion Designer: Form Found Design Location: Los Angeles  
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PAU Wow

PAU to unleash 2,100-unit affordable housing complex in East New York
Practice for Architecture and Urbanism (PAU) is bringing over 2,000 units of affordable housing to the East New York neighborhood of Brooklyn, New York, via a partnership with the Christian Cultural Center (CCC), an influential neighborhood church, and the Gotham Organization. The ten-acre development will be anchored by community services geared towards current residents in a neighborhood that's been in developers' crosshairs since a 2016 rezoning. Over the next decade-and-a-half, the team plans to deliver an "urban village" in the shadow of Starrett City, the country's largest federally-backed affordable housing complex. In addition to 2,100 apartments spread out over nine buildings, the new development will include performing arts center, medical services, a site for vocational training, retail space for local entrepreneurs, as well as athletic facilities and over two acres of public space. The plot, now used for parking on worship days, is owned by CCC. Groundbreaking is slated for sometime in the mid-2020s. "When we traditionally think about infrastructure, it’s transportation and utilities," said PAU Founder and Principal Vishaan Chakrabarti, in a press release. "Today, we know that for a community to succeed it needs access to a broader infrastructure of opportunity—open space, education, health care, child care, social opportunities, and culture. Each of these things is considered in the plan that we have prepared with Gotham to advance Rev. Bernard’s vision for a sustainable and equitable community." The reverend Chakrabarti references is Rev. A.R. Bernard, leader of CCC's 45,000-member congregation. Although his church and its future development sit about two miles south of the recently-rezoned area, the idea for the development came about as a way to protect the largely working-class community the church serves in the face of rampant developer-driven speculation in the neighborhood. East New York is second only to Long Island City, Queens, in the number of residential permit approvals last year, according to The New York Times. As local developers line up to build in East New York, it'll be a busy next decade for PAU, too. The New York firm was tapped to master plan Sunnyside Yards, the pasta tangle of rail lines in Queens that could be largely decked over for up to 24,000 apartments and companion facilities.
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Are You Leddy For It?

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Adaptive Reuse
2018 Best of Design Award winner for Urban Design: San Francisco Art Institute at Fort Mason Designer: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects Location: San Francisco Located on the edge of San Francisco Bay, Fort Mason Pier 2 has been transformed from a historic army warehouse into a satellite campus for the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI). This adaptive reuse project preserves the industrial integrity of the landmark concrete-and-steel structure while supporting the school’s pedagogical goals. The iconic shed was restored with an integrated sustainable building system, working with the existing building structure and materials. A photovoltaic solar system was mounted on the building’s gabled roof. The design interweaves the historic and contemporary, preserving the dramatic, light-filled industrial structure to create 160 studios, workshops, flexible teaching spaces, public galleries, and a media theater. Honorable Mentions  Project Name: Empire Stores Designer: S9 Architecture Location: Brooklyn, New York Project Name: Cristo Rey St. Martin College Prep Designer: JGMA Location: Waukegan, Illinois
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Stalled! for time

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Research
2018 Best of Design Awards winner for Research: Stalled! Designer: JSA Stalled! is a design-research project by Joel Sanders Architects (JSA) in collaboration with Susan Stryker and Terry Kogan that responds to the national debate about transgender access to public restrooms. The speculative design addresses the need for safe, sustainable, and inclusive restrooms. While most debates consider this as solely a transgender rights issue, this project casts a wider net by developing inclusive guidelines that take all people into consideration. Using this inclusive design methodology, JSA created three viable and economical prototypes for inclusive facilities for new construction projects or retrofitting. A generic airport version reconceives the restroom as a semi-open agora, animated by three parallel activity zones dedicated to grooming, washing, and toilet facilities. Honorable Mentions Project name: Marine Education Center Designer: Lake|Flato Architects Location: Ocean Springs, Mississippi Project name: After Bottles; Second Lives Designer: ANAcycle design + writing studio/Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Location: Brooklyn, New York and Troy, New York
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Flat Living

2018 Best of Design Awards winners for Interior — Residential
2018 Best of Design Award for Interior — Residential: 15th St Designer: Mork Ulnes Architects Location: San Francisco

By converting an uninhabitable attic into a unified and light-filled volume, Mork Ulnes Architects gave new life to a 1907 Victorian flat. The formerly compartmentalized house was transformed into an expansive home centered on collective living. To host a growing family, the gabled attic level was lightly divided into bedrooms, thanks to a series of partial-height walls. A double-height stair atrium cuts into the center of the building, linking the newly habitable attic to the levels below. The attic’s wood framework is a graphic echo of the original roofline within the expanded building shell. This framework language carries throughout the project in casework details, windows, guardrails, and the kitchen.

Honorable Mentions Project Name: Fort Green Place Designer: Matter of Architecture Location: Brooklyn, New York Project Name: Little House. Big City. Designer: Office of Architecture Location: Brooklyn, New York
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Modernizing the Metro

MTA to double subway speed limits in parts of Brooklyn
Last weekend, New York City’s Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) doubled the speed limit on sections of two subway lines in Brooklyn, two decades after a high-speed train crash killed an operator and injured dozens of passengers. The recent changes, which boosted the speed limit of the N and R trains from 15 miles per hour to 30 miles per hour, are part of transit chief Andy Byford’s multi-billion-dollar proposal to revolutionize New York City’s subway system by eradicating delays. “We want to keep pushing trains through the pipe and moving them,” Byford told The New York Times. The modified sections of the N and R lines are the first of many to increase in speed, with 100 locations to follow this spring. Byford’s goal is to reverse issues that arose from system changes made after the 1995 crash, when two trains collided on the Williamsburg Bridge, killing a J-train operator and wounding multiple riders. The changes resulted in decreased speed limits and increased delays. While the MTA has previously blamed overcrowding and slow passenger loading times for delays, Byford claims that speed limits that were implemented decades ago are the main reason for the troubled system. Since the 1995 crash, speed limits as low as 15 miles per hour were put into place, while signal systems called “grade time signals” were adjusted to automatically trigger a train’s brakes when another train is close by. However, in a three-person investigation conducted by Byford last summer, it was discovered that there were not only 130 areas where trains could move faster while remaining safe, but also 267 faulty grade time signals, forcing operators to drive trains at slower speeds for no reason, even if there were no train up ahead. A 2010 report by transit planner Matt Johnson further revealed that New York City trains travel at roughly 17 miles per hour, which is slower than any other heavy rail system in the United States. Byford, with help from the MTA safety committee, strives to find the right balance between safety and speed, not wanting to allow trains to run any slower than they should. So far, 34 sections of track have been approved for speed increases by the MTA, while 30 grade time signals have been repaired throughout Brooklyn.