Search results for "hollywood"

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Fans of Pomo

Venturi, Scott Brown’s Sainsbury Wing wins the 2019 AIA Twenty-five Year Award
After awarding no building the prestigious Twenty-five Year Award in 2018, a first since the prize’s founding in 1971, the AIA has changed its tune for 2019. The 2019 award has been bestowed upon the Venturi, Scott Brown and Associates (VSBA)–designed Sainsbury Wing addition to London’s National Gallery. The Twenty-five Year Award was created to honor buildings that have “set a precedent for the last 25-35 years and continues to set standards of excellence for its architectural design and significance.” Additionally, buildings must be in good shape and still represent the original design intent. The Sainsbury Wing, a 120,000-square-foot addition to the 1838 National Gallery, was completed in 1991 and originally drew a mixture of scorn from both traditionalists and modernists who felt the scheme was trying to have the best of both worlds. As Adam Nathaniel Furman noted in an essay on the building’s convoluted history, VSBA used Postmodernism as a way to thread the needle between opposing demands. Clad in a large, unifying facade but containing a delicately-balanced and intimate set of galleries within, the Sainsbury Wing feels both new and old at once. In 2018 the addition was awarded Grade I preservation listing status, the highest level of recognition in the UK. The decision to recognize the Sainsbury Wing this year is likely in deference to the late Robert Venturi; the building falls well within the 1983-through-1993 range that the jury was considering last year. This isn’t the first time the AIA has recognized the Sainsbury Wing though, as it was awarded a National Award in 1992. The 2019 jury included Jeanne Chen, AIA, Chair, Moore Ruble Yudell Architects & Planners (Santa Monica, California): Rania Alomar, AIA, RA-DA (West Hollywood, California): Alicia Berg, AICP, University of Chicago (Chicago): Raymond M. Bowman, Assoc. AIA (Pittsburgh): Katherine K. Chia, FAIA, Desai Chia Architecture PC (New York City): Shannon R. Christensen, AIA, CTA Architects Engineers (Billings, Montana): Eugene C. Dunwody Jr., AIA, Dunwody/ Beeland Architects (Macon, Georgia): Henry Moss, AIA, Bruner/Cott & Associates, Inc. (Cambridge, Massachusetts): and David Rosa-Rivera, Savannah College of Art and Design (Bayamón, Puerto Rico).
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Can't-ilevering

Morphosis unveils a claw-like hotel to replace a legendary L.A. nightclub
The Viper Room, the legendary Los Angeles nightclub cofounded by Johnny Depp (and where River Phoenix overdosed) is set to get an architecturally ambitious replacement courtesy of Morphosis Architects. After developer Silver Creek Development Co. picked up the parcel in West Hollywood for $80 million in July of this year, it was announced that a 15-story hotel would go up on the site. Last week the public was given its first look at the replacement, which features a vise-like volume “clamping” down on a more traditional, loggia-adorned tower. The proposal also sports glassy ground-level retail bordered by V-shaped concrete columns. The 200-foot-tall hotel will feature 115 hotel rooms, 31 condo units, 10 affordable units, a gym, a spa, restaurants, a pool, and a new home for the Viper Room. It’s somewhat hard to see in the rendering, but the developer wants to include an 820-square-foot digital billboard on the Sunset Boulevard–facing facade. The project’s initial reveal came at a community meeting on December 11, where Silver Creek sought to solicit community feedback and refine the design. The hotel will move next to the West Hollywood Planning Commission’s Design Review Subcommittee, and then the Planning Commission proper. No construction timeline has been given as of yet.
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Big Names, Small Stuff

Woodbury launches Small Scale Architecture Store in time for the holidays
If you have some holiday shopping left to do, you're in luck. The Woodbury University School of Architecture in Los Angeles has launched a Small Scale Architecture Store just in time for the holidays. Located at the university's WUHO Gallery in Hollywood, the store features products and furniture pieces created by thought-provoking designers including Bureau Spectacular, DOT DOT DOT, Jenny Wu, New Affiliates, Ryan Tyler Martinez, ver|texx, and Yeh Studio. The store aims to "celebrate and sell the work of designers who push the boundaries of architecture and object, function and assembly, material and product, to produce indispensable objects to wear, utilize, adorn, carry, occupy, enlighten, and beautify" according to a press release. Included in the products that are up for sale are city-themed plates from NotNeutral, the product arm of RCH Studios, a faceted pendant light from DOT DOT DOT, fiberglass chairs from LA Forum and Modernica, and a Helicoid planter by Paul Anvar, among many others. Proceeds from the sales of the work will fund Woodbury University School of Architecture student scholarships. The store will run until December 23. See the WUHO Gallery website for more information.
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The Gift of Architecture

Last minute holiday shopping? Here’s what to get an architect
Trying to find a gift for a person who loves to build? We’ve asked our editors, our architect friends, and our friends who love architecture what was on their wish lists this year. From a cowboy-style hard hat to an architecture mixtape, there’s something for every architect on the 2019 AN gift guide. Happy shopping!  

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Glass House Snow Globe The Glass House Design Store $75 The Glass House is arguably the most visited (if not the most well-known) of all of Philip Johnson’s works. Architects and architecture enthusiasts alike can behold the modern icon frozen in time inside of a snow globe like no other.   Architect’s Cubes MoMA Design Store $58 Designed to inspire forms and exploration of materials, architects John Bennet and Gustavo Bonevardi conceived a set of eight cubes. Each made of a different material—maple wood, bakelite, cork, granite, EVA, silicone, acrylic, and aluminum—the Architect’s Cubes are made for play. Frank Lloyd Wright Paper Models: 14 Kirigami Buildings to Cut and Fold by Marc Hagan-Guirey $23 Build paper models of the most notable Frank Lloyd Wright buildings with this cut-and-fold kit. Using the art of kirigami (the cousin of origami), paper artist Marc Hagan-Guirey devised some of Wright’s most admired architecture, including Falling Water, the Guggenheim, and the National Life Insurance Building. LEGO Architecture Imperial Hotel $160 Built in 1915, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo was a fusion of Japanese and Western architecture. While it was demolished in 1968, the lobby and reflecting pool were moved to the Japanese architecture museum Meiji-Mura. You can create your own small-scale replica of the lost landmark with this set of LEGO building blocks.

Books and Stationery

The LEGO Architect By Tom Alphin $15 You know the saying, “learn by doing?” The LEGO Architect does exactly that. Flipping through the pages you first learn about the history of architecture and then find inspiration to build your own with images of LEGO models of iconic buildings. In the last section, the author instructs readers how to become LEGO architects with a set of instructions and parts from the LEGO Architecture Studio. Happy building! Architecture Christmas Cards $18 Chicago’s Marina City sporting a Santa hat; the Farnsworth House decked out like the yard of your neighbor who decorates for Christmas the day after Halloween; Seattle’s Space Needle adorned with a fir pine. These and other buildings we all know and love have been turned into Christmas cards by a former AN editor, John Stoughton. Available in packs of ten. An Architect’s Pencil Set: The Colors of Michael Graves $25 It’s no secret: One of the things Michael Graves is known for is his love (and mastery) of colors (mainly bright colors). Designed by his firm, this 24 colored-pencil set comes with an essay on color and the architect's design process. Rem Koolhaas. Elements of Architecture $125 Love to build? Rem Koolhaas worked with Harvard Graduate School of Design on “a primordial toolkit” that helps readers to understand how the seemingly constant fundamentals of architecture are actually always in flux and evolving. The guidebook chronicles the fundamentals of buildings and design techniques, detailing every single typology, from windows to walls to toilets. Hollywood Modern: Houses of the Stars by Alan Hess and Michael Stern $55 Are celebrities your guilty pleasure? This book documents 24 "modern" homes designed by architects for stars in Southern California. Featuring glossy, full-page photos, Hollywood Modern: House of the Stars gives you an inside look at houses like Quincy Jones's Gary Cooper House and Richard Neutra's Von Sternberg House.

To Wear

M1005 Matsuda $425 It all started with Le Corbusier and his fabulous round glasses. The black circular frames that we have all come to love have become part and parcel with architecture (having spectacular spectacles has become a common trope in the industry as a whole). Japanese optical maker Matsuda offers a frame that looks particularly Corbu-inspired. M1005 is hand finished with acetate and available in five colors. Architect Tools Tie $45 Long before AutoCAD, architects' tools were as important as scissors to a barber. This tie features a motif made up of drafting tools. While rulers and tape measures remain essential, so does the occasional smart tie. Cowboy-style Hard Hat $65 Get your hard hat on, cowboy! This is not your typical construction cap, it’s a new take that comes in the guise of a cowboy hat with all the safety benefits of a traditional hard hat. Yeehaw!

For the Home

Sunset & Night Chairs By LA Forum and Modernica Mies van der Rohe once said: “A chair is a very difficult object. A skyscraper is almost easier.” These fiberglass chairs by Los Angeles Forum for Architecture and Urban Design and fiberglass furniture purveyor Modernica are no exception. Even better, the proceeds from their sale will fund scholarships at Woodbury School of Architecture. You can find them at Small Scale Architecture Store in at the university's WUHO Gallery in Hollywood through December 23. Twist Again Odile Decq for Alessi $105 Finally, you can bring home an object designed by our favorite gothic architect (and seminal thinker), Odile Decq. Known as “the fruit holder that dances around the fruit,” the bowl reflects the common visual motifs that are associated with her works, only on a smaller scale. It is made from a piece of sheet metal that was cut and folded to create a whimsical, vortex-like shape that seemingly has an inner life force of its own. The Architect’s Mixtape: Practicing Spaces $10 Drop those funky beats! Practicing Spaces is a compilation of musical works by lesser-known musicians who all have one thing in common: they’re architects! From Michael Meredith of MOS Architects to Florian Idenburg of SO – IL, these funky beats are available in the format of a mixtape, that is, a cassette tape. Read more about the collective work and where to buy your own copy here.
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Paradise Lost

California fires claim over 7,000 structures and displace over 270,000 residents
A pair of particularly destructive wildfires that burned through the weekend in California have claimed over 7,000 structures and caused a wave of displacement across the state. The San Francisco Chronicle reported that the so-called Camp Fire grew to more than 105,000 acres over the weekend as it swept through Butte County in Northern California, devastating the town of Paradise. The fire quickly became the deadliest and largest wildfire in California history over the weekend, a record that has been broken every year for the last three years in a row. The blaze has so far claimed 6,713 structures, including 6,453 homes and 260 commercial buildings. It is expected that close to 15,000 other structures are threatened by the fire, which is currently 20 percent contained. So far, 31 people have died and over 100 are reported missing. Reports from the frontlines of the blaze indicate that much of the town has been destroyed, with journalists on the scene fielding calls to check in on particular properties and posting block-by-block surveys of the devastation on social media. It is expected that between 90 and 95 percent of the city was destroyed, leaving its 27,000 residents to seek shelter across the housing-strapped region.

In the Santa Monica mountains that ring Los Angeles, the 85,550-acre Woolsey Fire has forced the temporary displacement of over 250,000 people as the cities of Thousand Oaks and Malibu and surrounding mountain communities were evacuated in advance of the fast-moving blaze.

Curbed reported that the fires have threatened several historic Hollywood filming locations and other notable structures located in the scenic mountains, including a replica of the set from the television series M*A*S*H and the recently-restored historic Sepulveda Adobe complex. Distressingly, the fire also reportedly consumed the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, a former Rocketdyne laboratory from 1949 that housed experimental nuclear reactors as well as radioactive waste.

Many architecturally-significant structures are also at risk, including important works by Frank Gehry, Wallace Neff, John Lautner, as well as several of the Case Study homes, Curbed reported.

Several of the wealthy areas hit by the fire have seen heavy losses, as well, including the destruction of several celebrity-owned mansions in Calabasas and Malibu. The homes of pop stars Miley Cyrus, Robin Thicke, and Neil Young and others were destroyed by the inferno, E! Online reported.

The Los Angeles Times reported that the Woolsey Fire is 15 percent contained.

Regarding California’s increasingly destructive and lengthening fire season, Governor Jerry Brown told The LA Times, “This is not the new normal; this is the new abnormal.” Brown added, “And this new abnormal will continue certainly in the next 10 to 15 to 20 years. Unfortunately, the best science is telling us that dryness, warmth, drought, all those things, they’re going to intensify. We have a real challenge here threatening our whole way of life, so we’ve got to pull together.”

The fires touched off a series of antagonistic—and “ill-informed”—tweets from President Donald Trump, who erroneously blamed the fires on “gross mismanagement” of the state’s forests. Fire officials instead point to the increasing effects of climate change, as well as growing so-called “wildland-urban interface” zones where human occupation and the state’s natural landscapes come into contact, as key causes for the latest series of conflagrations.

Because the state’s populated urban areas have gradually slowed development and downsized population capacity over the decades, much of the state’s explosive population growth has largely occurred in increasingly-far-flung and precarious areas, where drought-ridden brush is easily combustible and sprawling communities are perfect targets for wind-swept flames.

Crews in the state are working to battle the flames as winds, temperatures, and humidity levels work against their favor. AN will bring more coverage of California’s fires as information becomes available.

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Best of the West

AIA | LA design awards highlight Southern California’s best design
The American Institute of Architects Los Angeles chapter (AIA|LA) has announced its annual design awards winners for 2018, highlighting the work of many of the region's most creative and thoughtful architecture practices. Awarded across three categories—Design, Next LA, and Committee on the Environment (COTE) LA—the organization's award program is designed to recognize achievements in overall design, highlight the work by emerging designers, and bring attention to hallmark sustainability-focused projects. Within each category, awards are ranked into "honor," "merit," and "citation" rankings.

Design Awards

This year's design category awards acknowledge a wide array of project types, from an undulating transit station in Seattle by Brooks + Scarpa to a Modernist-inspired winery by Bestor Architecture. The highlighted projects feature simple geometries that come outfitted with performative architectural elements like screen walls and shading devices that not only lend formal interest to each project but also manipulate light in essential and evocative ways. A full list of the design winners is below:
HONOR AWARDS
Animo South Los Angeles
Los Angeles, CA
Parallax Gap
Washington, DC
Camelot Kids Child Development Center
Los Angeles, CA
KeltnerCo Architecture + Design
Mariposa1038
Los Angeles, CA
Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects (LOHA)
Fenlon House
Los Angeles, CA
Martin Fenlon Architecture
Mayumi
Culver City, CA
ShubinDonaldson
MERIT AWARD
Ashes & Diamonds
Napa, CA
Stoneview Nature Center
Culver City, CA
Ehrlich Yanai Rhee Chaney Architects
UCSB San Joaquin Student Housing
Santa Barbara, CA
Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects
Studio Dental II
San Francisco, CA
Montalba Architects, Inc.
 
CITATION AWARDS
Angle Lake Station
Seattle/SeaTac, WA
Brooks + Scarpa
Shirley Ryan AbilityLab
Chicago, Illinois
HDR | Gensler with Clive Wilkinson Architects
Advanced Stem & Design Institutes
Los Angeles, CA
 
G-Cubed
Los Angeles, CA
Skidmore, Owings & Merrill LLP
2018 AIA|LA Design awards jury:
Steve Dumez, FAIA – Principal and Director of Design, Eskew+Dumez+Ripple
Elaine Molinar, AIA, LEED AP – Partner and Managing Director – The Americas, Snøhetta
Brett Steele, AA DIPL, HON FRIBA, FRSA – Dean, UCLA School of the Arts and Architecture
 

Next LA Awards

AIA|LA's Next LA Awards highlight unbuilt or in-the-works projects that push the envelope in terms of design or programmatic configuration. Synthesis Design + Architecture's Nansha Scholar's Tower in Guangzhou, China, for example, is formally inspired by smooth river rock cultural artifacts known as Gongshi and features a pair of pass-through elevated terraces that cycle air through the mid-rise tower's core. R&A Architecture and Design's Sunset Tower, on the other hand, proposes to use extended, undulating floor plates to create variable balcony and terrace spaces for a speculative development in West Hollywood. A full list of the Next LA winners:
HONOR
Boyle Tower
Los Angeles, CA
MUTUO
MERIT
Apertures
Mexico City, Mexico
Belzberg Architects
The New Center of Science & Technology in Suzhou
Shishan Park, Suzhou, China
Kevin Daly Architects
Pioneertown House
Pioneertown, CA
PARA-Project
Camp Lakota
Frazier Park, CA
Perkins+Will
Mercado El Alto
Puebla, Mexico
Rios Clementi Hale Studios
CITATION
MLK1101 Supportive Housing
Los Angeles, CA
Lorcan O'Herlihy Architects
Sunset Tower
West Hollywood, CA
R&A Architecture + Design
Nansha Scholar's Tower
Guangzhou, China
Synthesis Design + Architecture & SCUT Architectural Design & Research Institute
2018 AIA|LA Next LA awards jury: 
David Benjamin – Founding Principal, The Living, and Assistant Professor at Columbia GSAPP
Mario Cipresso, AIA – Associate Principal, Hawkins/Brown
Elizabeth Timme – Co-Founder, LA-Más

COTE LA Awards

The Committee on the Environment (COTE) LA awards focus on performance and sustainability. Gensler's CSUN Sustainability Center at the California State University, Northridge, campus in the San Fernando Valley utilizes recycled materials and furniture, makes efficient use of passive lighting, and features solar-powered electricity and hot water. The Arizona State University Biodesign Institute C complex by ZGF Architects, an Honor award winner, delivers energy savings of over 44 percent when compared to existing campus laboratories. The full list of COTE LA winners:
HONOR
Arizona State University Biodesign Institute C Tempe, AZ
ZGF Architects
CSUN Sustainability Center
Northridge, CA
Gensler
 
MERIT
Otis College of Art and Design Campus Expansion Los Angeles, CA Ehrlich | Fisher   UCSB BioEngineering Santa Barbara, CA Moore Ruble Yudell Architects & Planners   West Hollywood Automated Parking Garage West Hollywood, CA LPA, Inc.   CITATION Robert Redford Conservancy for Southern California Sustainability, Pitzer College Claremont, CA Carrier Johnson + Culture  
2018 AIA|LA COTE LA awards jury: 
William Leddy, FAIA – Founding Principal, Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects
Douglas E. Noble, FAIA – Director, Master of Building Science USC School of Architecture
Anne Schopf, FAIA – Partner, Mahlum Architects
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Concrete Feelings

A “brutalist” apartment building is on the way in West Hollywood
Love it or hate it, Brutalism is definitely back. For proof, look no further than Los Angeles, where local architect Marcello Pozzi is working on designs for an upscale “brutalist” courtyard apartment building that is wrapped in rough concrete finishes. Urbanize.LA reported that the project, a five-story, 10-unit complex located at 8615 West Knoll Drive, was recently submitted to the City of West Hollywood Design Review Subcommittee for approval. The development includes a mix of one- and two-bedroom units, including a pair of double-height ground floor apartments that each contain a mezzanine bedroom level. Although brut in its outer finishes, the complex will be nothing like your grandparents’ Brutalist housing schemes. Instead of dank, cold apartments, the complex is designed to embrace the Southern California sunshine and features warm wood finishes and lots of glass. Generous 11-foot floor-to-floor heights throughout the building will complement thin floor plates and pass-through apartment layouts to provide well-lit and open living spaces, according to a project statement. The development will also be marked by wide but shallow balconies along its principal facade. These exaggerated Juliet-style balconies aim to enhance the indoor-outdoor qualities of the main living spaces for each unit. A 17-foot-tall passageway along the ground floor will link to a 19-foot-by-31-foot planted courtyard designed by landscape architects Viriditas Design, as well. Architect Gwynne Pugh, who sits on the review subcommittee, issued a report for the building’s design, highlighting the “brutalist” elements and the development’s thoughtful site and apartment design. In the report, Pugh writes, “This has been put together very thoughtfully and elegantly. The simple forms [act] as a backdrop to the visceral experience of the environment.” Pugh also praised the ground floor landscaping for its “park-like” qualities while also highlighting that the design represents a “highly sophisticated project that has been thought through thoroughly.” Pugh added, “It is a relatively quiet building in its visual aspect but highly detailed in its simplicity. This is an appropriate project to be considered as exemplary.” A timeline for the development has not been revealed. Design and planning reviews for the project are currently pending.
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Traffic Buster

Elon Musk promises first high-speed L.A. tunnel will open in December
Elon Musk has continued his streak of sharing big news via Twitter: on Sunday, he announced that the Boring Company's first Los Angeles tunnel would open on December 10 and offer free rides to the public the following day. The 2-mile tunnel was carved out under Musk's Space X headquarters in Hawthorne and follows 120th Street, and is a test run for what Musk hopes will be a tunnel network that runs underneath the entire city. The high-speed system, which Musk tweeted would run at 155 mph, was originally intended for private cars but will now be designated for public transit, pedestrians, and cyclists. This is not the only tunnel that the Boring Company has undertaken in L.A.—another 2.7-mile route is being dug under Sepulveda Boulevard, which bypassed California's strict environmental review process—but this would be the first tunnel that to be completed. Musk also proposed a 3.6-mile-long "Dugout Loop" that would take riders from Los Feliz or East Hollywood to the Dodger Stadium in four minutes, for which the company held a sparsely attended public hearing in August. Of course, beyond Musk's company's ability to deliver on his grand promises, the feasibility of the Loop system proposed by Musk will be dependent on passing the state's environmental review and other approval processes. The Sepulveda-adjacent tunnel also faced community opposition, with officials in Culver City also considering a legal challenge. Will Musk's eventful summer be capped by the successful opening of a tunnel that improves Los Angeles commutes? Only time will tell.
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Hardware the Wild Things Are

Finely detailed hardware that people can’t keep their hands off of

These finishing touches add a glimmer of light and polish to any project. Rendered in gold, silver, bronze, and glass, this is hardware that is meant to last.

Top: Brass Pull Bar Buster + Punch

Right to left: Flex Knob Belwith Keeler

Tab Edge Pull Atlas Homewares

Vale Knob Belwith Keeler

Atlantic Knob O&G Studio

Hollywood Hills Cabinet Bar Baldwin Hardware

Clockwise from top: U-Shape Pull INOX Voile Pull Klodea Chrome Knob Elisabeth Norse Interiors Loop Pull Atlas Homewares Hollywood Hills Knob Baldwin Hardware

Background: Adamo & Eva cotton velvet Dedar

Clockwise, starting at top: Flex Knob Belwith Keeler Atlantic Knob O&G Studio Art Deco Pull INOX Vale Knob Belwith Keeler Newport Rosette with White Knob Grandeur Hardware

Hollywood Hills Knob Baldwin Hardware

Vale Pull Belwith Keeler

Circulaire Rosette with Coventry Knob Grandeur Hardware

Background: Splendido velvet Dedar

Top to bottom: ESOR Pull Sugatsune

Nouveau Handle Häfele

Flex Knob Belwith Keeler

4 Off Center Pull Atlas Homewares

Vale Pull Belwith Keeler

Nouveau Knob Häfele

Ultra Euro Pull Atlas Homewares

Clockwise from top:

Clear Fluted Crystal Cup Pull Nostalgic Warehouse

Gather Vase Good Thing Grab Bar Newport Brass Cheetah Glass Square Knob Atlas Homewares Carre Tall Plate with Baguette Amber Crystal Knob Grandeur Hardware

Clear Crystal Cup Pull Nostalgic Warehouse

Horn Handles Viking Handles Leather Handles OCHRE
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Meet Connie

A vintage airplane will become a cocktail lounge at the TWA Hotel
Last week, “Connie,” a meticulously restored 1958 Lockheed L-1649A Constellation Starliner, was trucked over 300 miles from an airport in Auburn, Maine to New York City, where it will serve as a cocktail lounge for John F. Kennedy International Airport’s new TWA Hotel. After purchasing the dilapidated airliner earlier this year, the hotel’s developer, MCR Development, partnered with Atlantic Models and Gogo Aviation to return it to its original condition. The transformation, which included refurbishing the 116-foot-long fuselage, replacing the missing nose cone, repairing the damaged wings and tail, as well as outfitting the cockpit with authentic controls, was completed in just six months. The L-1649A Constellation was designed for Trans World Airlines in 1956 by renowned aeronautical engineer Clarence "Kelly" Johnson. Although it was soon surpassed in speed and carrying capacity by the Boeing 707, its sleek shape and signature triple tail stabilizers made it an enduring symbol of 20th-century aviation. Today, Connie is one of only four L-1649A Starliners remaining in the world. “Our Connie started her illustrious TWA career at Idlewild (now JFK) in 1958,” said Tyler Morse, CEO and managing partner of MCR. “She was replaced by jets in 1960 and survived working as an Alaskan bush plane in the 1970s, only to be abandoned by drug runners in Honduras in the 1980s. We’re excited for her return to JFK as the Queen of Queens.” The airliner is the latest piece of Jet Age memorabilia to be added to the 1960s-themed TWA Hotel, a two-wing expansion of Eero Saarinen’s iconic TWA Flight Center. In addition to the passenger-plane-turned-night-spot, the hotel complex will feature an aviation museum and flight observation deck, as well as 512 guest rooms decorated with mid-century modern furnishings, vintage rotary phones, and Hollywood-style amenities. The TWA Hotel was designed by New York’s own Lubrano Ciavarra Architects, and is set to open in early 2019.
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Hollywood Park Rises

Renderings unveiled for mixed-use neighborhood around L.A.’s new NFL stadium
A project team led by developers Wilson Meany and Stockbridge has unveiled the latest batch of renderings for a 2,500-unit mixed-use neighborhood set to rise around the forthcoming Los Angeles Rams stadium in Inglewood, California. Gensler, BCV Architecture + Interiors, Architects Orange, and Hart Howerton are providing architectural design services for the project while Studio-MLA is the landscape architect for the 298-acre site, Curbed reports. The new HKS Architects–designed, $2.66-billion stadium is in the midst of heavy construction and topped out earlier this year. The teardrop-shaped structure will come wrapped in over 36,000 perforated metal panels and will be punctuated by a large-format elliptical screen located at its uppermost levels that will play advertisements and other graphic projections. A large artificial lake will be located beside the stadium, as well, and will feature a series of waterfalls. The stadium is due to be completed in 2020. According to a project website, the new surrounding neighborhood will open in phases starting in 2020 with an initial batch of 314 apartments of various configurations, including three-bedroom units, spread out over two structures. Eventually, the development will contain 2,500 dwelling units, 620,000-square feet of retail spaces, a 300-key hotel, and a new casino. The new renderings portray a series of porous outdoor shopping areas connected by covered outdoor spaces, programmed landscape areas, and indoor-outdoor venues like a foodie-friendly dining hall and several covered lounge areas. The plans also call for a long and narrow amphitheater and a performance stage. Residential areas for the development will see structures two- to four-stories in height while the hotel complex is slated for a five-story structure anchored by groundfloor retail. An unspecified amount of office space will also be included in the project. The size and market-driven nature of the new development—there are no new affordable housing units slated in conjunction with the project—has already jump-started gentrification in the renter-heavy, predominantly working-class area. Estimates indicate that property values have increased by as much as 80 percent in recent years, Curbed reports. New housing and shopping are not the only things coming to the area, however. A recently-unveiled plan seeks to link the new neighborhood with the regional transit system by building a new 1.8-mile automated people mover. The new infrastructure aims to provide easy access to the site when it will be used as a venue during the 2028 Olympic games, which Los Angeles is hosting across a series of scattered regional sites and facilities that will include the new stadium complex. *Correction: This story incorrectly reported that 3,000 housing units were being built in conjunction with the development; The correct figure is 2,500 units. 
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LAX Artport

LAXART grows up thanks to a Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects upgrade
Lorcan O’Herlihy Architects (LOHA) completed work earlier this year on a spate of renovations and alterations to LAXART gallery in Los Angeles, a project the firm initially designed back in 2015. The gallery originally opened under the stewardship of founding curator Lauri Firstenberg 13 years ago in a Culver City space designed by architect Peter Zellner. It was intended to serve as an alternative gallery that provided a platform for emerging L.A.-based artists. LAXART came under the leadership of the curator Hamza Walker in 2016, shortly after its move to the LOHA-designed spaces. Now solidly established, the gallery has been opened up by LOHA in order to accommodate larger exhibitions and public events. Lorcan O’Herlihy, founding principal at LOHA, explained: “The interiors have changed from an organization of small galleries for several concurrent solo shows to a reoriented space that is organized around a single central gallery.” LAXART is currently showing Remote Castration, a group exhibition curated by Catherine Taft that focuses on the #MeToo and Time’s Up movements as related to feminist thought in contemporary art. LAXART 7000 Santa Monica Boulevard West Hollywood, California 323-871-4140