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Rise and Fall

Weekend edition: Goodbyes for 2018
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Editorial: Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke’s tenure was a national disgrace Antonio Pacheco, our West Coast Editor, sounds off on outgoing Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke and his scandal-ridden tenure. University of Tennessee fires architecture adviser after reported abuse at former job Lee Waldrep was fired from his current job at the school's College of Architecture and Design after a report surfaced accusing him of sexual harrassment. From last week, in case you missed it: Stop asking where all the female architects are; we’re right here Madame Architect editor Julia Gamolina weighs in on the tired, problematic question: Where are all the female architects?
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2018 Winding Down

Weekend edition: Women in architecture aren’t hiding but face challenges in the field
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Stop asking where all the female architects are; we’re right here Madame Architect editor Julia Gamolina weighs in on the tired, problematic question: Where are all the female architects? Design legend Murray Moss discusses the future of “anti-disciplinarity” The design legend gave two lectures and graduate-level workshops this past semester at the Rhode Island School of Design (RISD). Architects rally behind Doriana Fuksas after prize snub This month two groups started a petition demanding that Doriana Fuksas be included in a lifetime achievement award given to her partner Massimiliano. San Francisco orders historic Neutra home be rebuilt after being torn down After an illegal demolition of one of the five remaining Richard Neutra–designed homes in San Francisco, the homeowner was ordered to build an exact replica. AN will be closed through Wednesday, December 26, but we will see you on Thursday!
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Building Wall and Building Wall Quickly

Weekend edition: Amazon gets grilled, Brutalism gets preserved, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Stunning new photos document I.M. Pei’s early brutalist museum I.M. Pei's first museum design, The Everson Museum of Art, is a big, brutalist structure that's celebrating its 50th birthday in Syracuse, New York. Chicago aims to preserve the vernacular architecture in its largest Mexican-American community The Commission on Chicago Landmarks has approved a preliminary designation for a dense array of vernacular buildings in the heart of Pilsen. Against all odds, progressive land-use reforms are taking root in American cities With Minneapolis, San Francisco, and Los Angeles moving forward with land-use reforms, the thinking behind how American cities work could soon change. DHS says it is “building wall and building wall quickly” in bizarre statement In an odd press release, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security touts quick construction of the U.S.-Mexico border wall key sections. New York’s proposal for Amazon’s HQ2 is much worse than we thought The concessions from the city have raised eyebrows and triggered a trio of City Council hearings on the terms of the deal.
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Awards Season

Weekend edition: Winners, Travis Scott, and New York’s next great public space
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! MoMA picks five finalists for the Young Architects Program 2019 The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1 have announced the five finalists for next year’s 20th annual Young Architects Program (YAP). Snøhetta goes back to the drawing board with revised AT&T Building plans Snøhetta is back at work on the AT&T Building renovation. This time they've released new renderings showing their plans for the tower's entrance and garden. Travis Scott tweets that he is applying to Harvard GSD Travis Scott announced on Twitter that he is applying to Harvard University's Graduate School of Design to study architecture this week. New York’s High Line prepares to open its next great public space The first art project on the new High Line plinth will be Brick House, a sixteen-foot-tall bronze bust of a black woman by Brooklyn’s Simone Leigh. Announcing the winners of the 2018 AN Best of Design Awards We are proud to announce the winners of 2018's AN Best of Design Awards. Congratulations to all of our winners and honorable mentions!
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My Dear Friends...

Weekend edition: Patrik Schumacher takes to the comments to respond to critics
Patrik Schumacher recently took to the comments section of The Architect's Newspaper to respond to critics who published an open letter protesting his suit against the executors of Zaha Hadid's estate. Beneath the letter from "a group of close friends, fellow and former students, and employees of Zaha Hadid," Schumacher wrote:
My dear friends, I wish you had given me a chance to explain to you what is going on before you throw your stones: "Schumacher's ... behavior ... thwarting Zaha's last wishes." Are we no longer on first name terms? Have you seen Zaha's letter of wishes? Let's talk soon.
Rodney Place, one of the signatories of the letter, then responded with the comment:
Dear Patrik, I think, as old friends of Zaha's, we are morally obliged to distinguish (and protect) her "legacy" from her "business". She always tried to make time for her old friends, despite or maybe because of the alienation of fame. Eventually she was everywhere before she arrived; it became exhausting. We need to reciprocate. This might have been an interesting discussion amongst friends and colleagues, including you, about how legacy and inspiration might, in the end, be more important than assets? Unfortunately you took it into the coldness of The High Court, instead of inviting this discussion? Way, way back then, when Zaha had won the Peak competition, but hadn't built a building, I managed through a colleague in New York, to get her as the front of an invited team pitching in the Times Square redevelopment. After she met with the production architect and developer carnivores, she called me. She said, more or less, "Fish, they want me for my body, not my mind". I said, tell them to get f....d. She did. Her mind lives on..... Rodney
The controversy at the heart of the back-and-forth revolves around Schumacher's lawsuit against the three other executors of Hadid's estate. Those executors characterized Schumacher's suit as an attempt by him to take total control of Hadid's property and legacy. Schumacher, however, disagrees with this characterization and said that he is just trying to align the execution of Hadid's estate with her true wishes, known to him. AN reached out to Schumacher for comment, but he did not respond. To catch up on the controversy, check out previous coverage here and here.
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Gobble Gobble!

Weekend edition: Zaha’s friends fight back, the price of Paul Rudolph, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Zaha Hadid’s friends and colleagues pen open letter against Patrik Schumacher A group of close friends, fellow and former students, and employees of Zaha Hadid are protesting Patrik Schumacher's treatment of her estate. At Sarasota Modernism Weekend, Paul Rudolph dazzles—for a price Sarasota Modernism Weekend gives visitors the chance to experience Paul Rudolph's seminal work, but the pricetag keeps it out of reach of many. Listen to your favorite architect’s band on this designer mixtape Readers may know Michael Meredith and Florian Idenburg from their work in their day jobs, but by night these architects let the music play.
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Roundup

Weekend Edition: Schumacher sues, Björk debuts, and more
Missed some of this week's architecture news, or our tweets and Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Patrik Schumacher sues to become sole executor of Zaha Hadid’s estate Seeking to oust the other three executors of Zaha Hadid's $90 million estate, Schumacher has filed a claim with London's High Court. Björk announces new show for The Shed in New York City Icelandic pop pioneer Björk will be world premiering Cornucopia at The Shed, the cultural institution set to open in Manhattan's Hudson Yards. Michael Graves Architecture completes the world’s tallest statue The nearly 600-foot-tall Statue of Unity in Gujarat, India, depicts Sardar Vallabhbhai Patel, an integral figure in the independence movement. Atlanta council members green light controversial $5 billion Gulch project Last Monday, in a midnight vote before election day, the Atlanta City Council approved a proposal to redevelop “The Gulch,” a 40-acre swath of the city. AIA outlines 6 key post-election issues to pursue with new Congress Following last week’s midterm elections, the AIA held a “Post-Election Debrief” to outline six key issues it’s set to focus on with the new U.S. Congress. That's it; have a great weekend!
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Roundup

Weekend Edition: D.C.’s newest museum, election analysis, and more
Missed some of our articles, tweets, or Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! D.C.’s newest museum goes underground to explore the American police system The new National Law Enforcement Museum in Washington, D.C., opened to the public in mid-October and teaches civilians what it's like to be police officer. Florida residents demand border wall around Habitat for Humanity housing Habitat for Humanity announced that an upcoming affordable housing development in East Naples, Florida, will have to be built with a concrete border wall. Amazon to split HQ2 between New York and Virginia, but can they handle it? News of a Crystal City Amazon headquarters may have been premature; it now seems the tech giant is looking at Long Island City as well. What did the 2018 midterms mean for East Coast architects? Let out a sigh of relief; the 2018 midterm elections are over, and voters passed judgment up and down the Eastern Seaboard on a wave of measures. West Coast sees big wins (and losses) in architecture and urbanism ballot initiatives As Democratic voters retook the House of Representatives and key gubernatorial seats, a series of initiatives saw mixed results in western states. That's all. See you Monday.  
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Roundup

Weekend edition: Foster grounded in Mexico, BIG grows in New York, and more
Missed some of our articles, tweets, or Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! Foster + Partners' Mexico City airport scrapped by public referendum Mexico City’s new Foster + Partners–designed airport has been canceled while already under construction after a public vote on its fate. Artist sought to transform gallery into beacon for Black lives, then the university stepped in American MONUMENT, an installation created by lauren woods for the Art Museum at CSU Long Beach, was paused after the museums fired its executive director. BIG completes a curvaceous school for WeWork WeWork's first school, WeGrow is now finished and in session. The BIG-designed elementary school is defined up by soft forms and an open floor plan. The Museum of Trans Hirstory & Art (MOTHA) queers monument design Consciousness Razing—The Stonewall Re-Memorialization Project challenges how public monuments can exclude or diminish the contributions of trans people. University of Cincinnati plans to demolish the brutalist Crosley Tower The University of Cincinnati's Crosley Tower, a 16-story concrete brutalist structure designed by local firm A.M. Kinney, is slated for demolition. Enjoy the start of November, and see you on Monday!
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Roundup

Weekend Edition: Gossip, Rahm Emanuel, and more
Missed some of our articles, tweets, or Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! The best gossip from 15 years of The Architect’s Newspaper To celebrate our 15th anniversary, we looked back through the archives for our favorite moments since we started. We found stories that aged well (and some that didn’t), as well as a wide range of interviews, editorials, and other articles that we feel contributed to the broader conversation. We also took a closer look at the most memorable tributes to those we lost, and heard from editors past and present about their time here. The Architect’s Newspaper has run an Eavesdrop column in its print edition that collects gossip from across the architecture community. It has served as a playful way to keep track of thoughts, feelings, and actions that have run in design's undercurrents. What will be Rahm Emanuel’s legacy on Chicago’s architecture? It was a shock when Rahm Emanuel declared that he wouldn't be seeking a third term due to mounting scandals, and AN took a look back at his mixed architectural legacy. NYC Parks Commissioner talks policy, parks, and breaking down barriers Over the next three months, The Architect’s Newspaper will feature a series of three interviews with Susannah Drake, founding principal of DLANDstudio, and leading public space advocates. Up first, Mitchell Silver will discuss the Parks Without Borders initiative to make parks and open space more accessible. That's it! Enjoy the weekend, and see you Monday.
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Roundup

Weekend Edition: Our 15th anniversary, Hurricane Michael, and more
Missed some of our articles, tweets, or Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! A brief history of architecture in the 21stcentury To celebrate our 15th anniversary, we looked back through the archives for our favorite moments since we started. We found stories that aged well (and some that didn’t), as well as a wide range of interviews, editorials, and other articles that we feel contributed to the broader conversation. We also took a closer look at the most memorable tributes to those we lost, and heard from editors past and present about their time here. What can we learn from the house that survived Hurricane Michael? One Florida vacation home that withstood the Category-4 winds was designed for an even stronger one. The catch? The cost is out of reach for many of the small town's residents. Frank Gehry remembers Robert Venturi and VSBA’s work Last week, architect Frank Gehry spoke to The Architect’s Newspaper regarding the recent passing of postmodern hero Robert Venturi at age 93. Go plan your Halloween costumes, and see you on Monday!
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Roundup

Weekend Edition: Resilient Puerto Rico, Richard Meier steps aside, and more
Missed some of our articles, tweets, or Facebook posts from the last few days? Don’t sweat it—we’ve gathered the week’s must-read stories right here. Enjoy! How an architect is using solar power to prevent Puerto Rico’s next disaster In the year since Hurrican Maria struck Puerto Rico in September 2017, the island has struggled to rebuild its electrical infrastructure, but architect Jonathan Marvel and others founded Resilient Power Puerto Rico (RPPR) to bring energy back to community centers across the island. Richard Meier permanently steps away from firm in wake of sexual assault allegations Richard Meier & Partners Architects today announced that Richard Meier "will step back from day-to-day activities" at his firm. This comes after the architect took a six-month leave of absence in the wake of sexual harassment and assault allegations. A major mid-century modern bank in Oklahoma City gets leveled The former Founders National Bank, a mid-century modern structure featuring two distinct, 50-foot exterior arches, was listed for sale at $3 million last fall but couldn’t find a tenant leading up to Monday’s last-minute demolition. Enjoy the weekend, and see you Monday.