Search results for "east new york"

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Fittings and Furniture

Price Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine by Payette with Valley City Architectural Furniture
Robert Benson Photography

 

CARPET & TEXTILE 

Edelman Leather
979 3rd Ave., New York
212-751-3339
www.edelmanleather.com 

Interface
404 Park Ave. South, New York
212-994-9994
www.interfaceflor.com

National Interiors
145 Palisade St.
Dobbs Ferry, NY
914-478-9200
www.nationalinteriorsinc.com 

Shaw Floors
616 East Walnut Ave.
Dalton, GA
800-441-7429
www.shawfloors.com 

CONSULTANTS

Ferguson Cox Associates
1410 Ridge Rd.
North Haven, CT
203-288-6223

WB Wood
100 5th Ave., New York
212-206-9500
www.wbwood.com

FURNITURE

Dune
88 Franklin St., New York
212-925-6171
www.dune-ny.com

Geiger International
6095 Fulton Industrial Blvd. SW
Atlanta, GA
800-444-8812
www.hmgeiger.com

HBF
900 12th St. Dr. NW
Hickory, NC
828-328-2064
www.hbf.com 

Karl Glave
738 Grand St., Brooklyn
212-920-9959

KI
71 W. 23rd St., New York
212-337-9909
www.ki.com

Knoll
76 9th Ave., New York
800-343-5665
www.knoll.com

MOB A.S.
Buyukdere Caddesi 173
Levent Pl. 13, levent 34330
Istanbul, Turkey
+90-212-3243-600

Moroso dba Unifor
146 Greene St., New York
212-334-7222
www.moroso.it
www.unifor.it

Poltrona Frau
141 Wooster St., New York
212-777-7592
www.poltronafrau.com

RG Furniture Design
410 17th St., Brooklyn
917-860-0980
www.rgfurnituredesign.com

Tomas Daskam
646-436-0583

Valley City Architectural
Furniture
64 Hatt St.
Dundas, Ontario
Canada
905-628-2253
www.valleycity.com

HARDWARE

FSB USA
1 Bishop Ln.
Madison, CT
202-404-4700
www.fsbusa.com

Häfele
25 East 26th St., New York
800-423-3531
www.hafele.com/us

Rixson
1902 Airport Rd.
Monroe, NC
704-283-2101
www.rixson.com

Sargent
100 Sargent Dr.
New Haven, CT
800-727-5477
www.sargentlock.com 

Von Duprin
2720 Tobey Dr.
Indianapolis, IN
800-999-0408
www.vonduprin.com

KITCHEN & BATH

AF New York
22 W. 21st St., New York
212-243-5400
www.afsupply.com

Bulthaup
578 Broadway, New York
212-966-7183
www.bulthaup.com

Clivus Multrum
15 Union St.
Lawrence, MA
978-725-5591
www.clivusmultrum.com

Dornbracht
5 Tudor City Pl., New York
212-867-9065
www.dornbracht.com

Duravit
105 Madison Ave., New York
212-686-0033
www.duravit.us

Harbour Food Service Equipment
229 Marginal St.
Chelsea, MA
617-884-3900
www.harbourfood.com 

John Boos + Co.
315 S. 1st St.
Effingham, IL
217-347-7701
www.johnboos.com

Poggenpohl
150 East 58th St., New York
212-355-3666
www.poggenpohlusa.com

Sam Tell & Son
300 Smith St.
Farmingdale, NY
800-510-7505
www.samtell.com

Waterworks
469 Broome St., New York
212-966-0605
www.waterworks.com

 

 


chelsea modern by audrey matlock architect with mob a.s.
 
COURTESY ama
 

 “Karl Glave makes beautiful handcrafted wood furniture to detailed specifications. He gives lots of attention to each project and guides you along the potentials of traditional wood fabrication.”
Bradley Horn
BermanHornStudio

“The JWT offices were very complex in terms of furniture. WB Wood and project manager Denise Daur were critical teammates who understood the local conditions and did all of the procurement and installations.”
Neil Muntzel
Clive Wilkinson Architects 

MOB A.S. can do an entire interior finish. They do lights, beds, cabinetry—everything. They’re a one-stop shop. At the Chelsea Modern, they did the cabinets. They’re very good, and because they’re in Turkey, the pricing is right. They do work all over the world, so they’re very capable.”
Audrey Matlock
Audrey Matlock Architect

“The casework design at Albert Einstein was executed wonderfully by Valley City. They bring a high level of craft to the work they do. It’s adaptable and flexible enough to accommodate changing research.”
Chris Baylow
Payette

“Everyone does plated brass or aluminum, but Dornbracht offered nickel silver, even on pieces they don’t normally do because of the scale and nature of the project. It was perfect for the modern-but-traditional look we were after at Guerlain’s Waldorf Astoria Spa.”
Christopher King
AC Martin


queens botanical garden visitor and administration center by bksk architects with shaw floors
 
COURTESY bksk
 
 

“At Bank of America we did work with one consultant that we don’t always use: a furniture consultant, Ferguson Cox Associates. We also worked with them on the New York Times Building. They bring a lot of value and support, not only with coordination and installation, which is no small task, but they also bring intelligence to the team in terms of offering furniture from a design point of view.”
Rocco Giannetti
Gensler

Shaw Floors’ cradle-to-cradle products hit all the notes on sustainability at the Queens Botanical Garden. It was as if the garden came right into the conference room.”
Julia Nelson
BKSK Architects

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Lighting

Bank of America Headquarters, One Bryant Park by Gensler with HDLC Architectural Lighting
Courtesy Gensler

 

DESIGNERS

Aurora Lampworks
172 North 11th St., Brooklyn
718-384-6039
www.auroralampworks.com

Bonilla Dacey Design Group
1275 15th St.
Fort Lee, NJ
201-917-5366
www.bonilladaceydesign.com 

Brandston Partnership
122 West 26th St., New York
212-924-4050
www.brandston.com 

Fisher Marantz Stone
22 West 19th St., New York
212-691-3020
www.fmsp.com 

HDLC Architectural Lighting
10 East 38th St., New York
212-529-7800
www.hdlclighting.com

Horton Lees Brogden Lighting Design
200 Park Ave. South, New York
212-674-5580
www.hlblighting.com

Johnson Light Studio
335 West 38th St., New York
212-868-5204
www.johnsonlightstudio.com 

Lighting Workshop
20 Jay St., Brooklyn
212-796-6510
www.ltgworkshop.com 

lightTH!S
256 Hanover St.
Boston, MA
617-227-6920
www.light-this.com 

Office for Visual Interaction
207 West 25th St., New York
212-206-8600
www.oviinc.com 

Renfro Design Group
15 East 32nd St., New York
212-229-9990
www.renfrodesign.com

Sachs Morgan Studio
224 West 30th St., New York
212-765-4144
www.sachsmorganstudio.com 

Susan Brady Lighting Design
132 West 36th St., New York
212-967-1274

FIXTURES

Artemide
46 Greene St., New York
212-925-1588
www.artemide.us 

Boyd Lighting
944 Folsom St.
San Francisco, CA
415-778-4300
www.boydlighting.com 

Broome Lampshade
325 Broome St., New York
212-431-9666
www.lampshadesny.com 

Crosslink
950 Bolger Ct.
St. Louis, MO
877-456-5864
www.crosslinkusa.com 

Liberty Lighting Group
100 Passaic Ave.
Chatham, NJ
973-701-0600
www.llgnjinc.com 

Lido Lighting
966 Grand Blvd.
Deer Park, NY
631-595-2000
www.lidolighting.com 

Lutron
7200 Suter Rd.
Coopersburg, PA
888-588-7661
www.lutron.com 

Michiko Sakano Glass
1155 Manhattan Ave., Brooklyn
917-783-0893
www.michikosakano.com

O’Lampia Studio
155 Bowery, New York
212-925-1660
www.olampia.com 

Selux
5 Lumen Ln.
Highland, NY
845-691-7723
www.selux.com 

Vision Quest Lighting
90 13th Ave.
Ronkonkoma, NY
631-737-4800
www.vql.com

Zumtobel Lighting
44 West 18th St., New York
212-243-0460
www.zumtobel.com

 


scottsdale museum of contemporary art installation by studio luz with crosslink
 
COURTESY studio luz
 
 

“For our exhibit installation at the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art, we worked with Crosslink to develop a canopy with an integrated lighting system. It’s an electroluminescent film printed on fabric that’s flexible and very beautiful. They’re currently deploying the concept for military tent structures in Afghanistan and Iraq.”
Hansy Better Barraza
Studio Luz Architects 

Michiko Sakano is amazing. She works on projects for the Smithsonian Museum as well as artists around the world. I believe she is one of the best glass designers and blowers in the world. Not only did she do our custom lighting at I Sodi but also vases, sconces, and even glasses for the bar.”
Josh Dworkis
Isadore Design Build 

“In addition to design, Bill Pierro is also a lighting consultant, so Lido Lighting is like one-stop shopping. He’ll come up with new products and solutions that will work for different situations. We used them to figure out the lighting in Bar Blanc and also the townhouse, and almost every project. “
Will Meyer
Meyer Davis Studio 

Aurora created very thin pancake electrical boxes that could be hidden in the historical fixtures at the Eldridge Street Synagogue, and even got them UL certified. And they got a great patination on the replicas they made.”
Jill Gotthelf
Walter Sedovic Architects

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Consultants

Queens Botanical Garden by BKSK Architects with Conservation Design Forum
Nicole de Feo

 

A/V & ACOUSTICS

Cerami Associates
404 5th Ave., New York
212-370-1776
www.ceramiassociates.com 

CMS
8 Fletcher Pl.
Melville, NY
631-425-3000
www.cmsav.com 

Donaldson Acoustics
150 Wireless Blvd.
Hauppauge, NY
631-952-0800 

DVI Communications
11 Park Pl., New York
212-267-2929
www.dvicomm.com 

ear NETWORKS
361 West 52nd St., New York
212-941-5707
www.earnetworks.com 

Edit Educational Center
2127 Crompond Rd.
Cortland Manor, NY
914-739-0701
www.editinc.com 

Electronic Crafts
www.electroniccrafts.org 

Essential Communications
124 W. 30th St., New York
212-239-7200
www.makeasoundinvestment.com 

Shen Milsom Wilke
417 5th Ave., New York
212-725-6800
www.smwinc.com

ENERGY EFFICIENCY

Bright Power
11 Hanover Sq., New York
212-803-5868
www.brightpower.com 

EXHIBITION DESIGN

Hadley Designs
1700 Elmwood Ave.
Buffalo, NY
716-874-3666
www.hadleyexhibits.com 

EXPEDITERS

Design 2147
52 Diamond St., Brooklyn
718-383-9340

Jam Consultants
104 West 29th St., New York
212-244-4427

Jerome S. Gillman Consulting
40 Worth St., New York
212-349-9304

William Vitacco Associates
299 Broadway, New York
212-791-4578
www.vitacco.com 

FIRE PROTECTION/CODE CONSULTING

CI Code Consultants
215 West 40th St., New York
212-216-9596
www.codeconsultants.com 

Rolf Jensen & Associates
360 West 31st St., New York
212-695-6670
www.rjainc.com

GREEN ROOF

Conservation Design Forum
375 West 1st St.
Elmhurst, IL
630-559-2000
www.cdfinc.com 

KITCHEN DESIGN

Clevenger, Frable, LaVallee
39 Westmoreland Ave.
White Plains, NY
914-997-9660
www.cfldesign.com 

LABORATORY

Jacobs Consultancy
303 South Broadway
Tarrytown, NY
914-333-1110
www.gprplanners.com 

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTS

Balmori Associates
833 Washington St., New York
212-431-9191
www.balmori.com 

Lee Weintraub Landscape Architecture
59 Edgecliff Ter.
Yonkers, NY
914-965-6540

Michael Van Valkenburgh
18 East 17th St., New York
212-243-2506
www.mvvainc.com 

MKW + Associates
39 Park Ave.
Rutherford, NJ
201-933-7809
www.mkwla.com 

Quennell Rothschild & Partners
118 West 22nd St., New York
212-929-3330
www.qrpartners.com 

Robin Key Landscape Architecture
333 Hudson St., New York
212-229-2534
www.rklastudio.com 

Thomas Balsley Associates
31 West 27th St., New York
212-684-9230
www.tbany.com

LEED

Viridian Energy & Environmental
21 West 38th St., New York
212-704-9920
www.viridianee.com 

OWNER’S REPRESENTATIVE

Levien & Company
570 Lexington Ave., New York
212-702-0888
www.levienco.com

PRESERVATION

Building Conservation Associates
158 West 27th St., New York
212-777-1300
www.bcausa.com 

PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT

Aria
17395 Daimler St.
Irvine, CA
949-475-2915
www.aria-group.com 

SIGNAGE & WAYFINDING

Pentagram
204 5th Ave., New York
212-683-7000
www.pentagram.com

 


P.F.1 by work ac with electronic crafts

elizabeth felicella



broadway penthouse by joel sanders architect with balmori associates

peter aaron/esto
 
 

“David Schwartz of Essential Communications is a master at the seamless integration of all the components into the architecture to create an incandescent sound that doesn’t interrupt the design of a space.”
Ed Rawlings
Rawlings Architects 

Cerami helped us with a tough condition in the multi-purpose room. In order to create the right setting we had to have the right acoustics, but we didn’t want to disrupt the wonderful architecture of the room. Together we came up with this concealed panel system that sits behind the arches. They were good partners in the process, very responsive.”
Sylvia Smith
FXFowle 

“The green roof was both the client’s and the public’s favorite part of the Queens Botanical Garden. Conservation Design Forum did a plant selection in terms of seasonal variety and color that really demonstrates what’s possible in a 6-inch soil.”
Julia Nelson
BKSK Architects 

“Because Rouge Tomate is so heavily influenced by the cooking technique, the design of the kitchen was extremely important. Foster Frable proved to be the perfect complement for Rouge Tomate’s desire to create the most well-designed kitchen possible.”
Thomas J. Lozada
Bentel & Bentel 

“Lab design is a science and if you haven’t done it before it can make your head explode. Basically the lab plan component dictates the building and Jacobs Consultancy helped us to understand that at the Weill Research Center. They were great teachers.”
Renny Logan
Richard Meier & Partners 

Lee Weintraub is a great designer, very responsive, very thoughtful. He was able to get the maximum number of uses from a small space, and to involve as many residents as possible.”
William Stein
Dattner Architects 

Robin Key Landscape Design created a really great outdoor room in the rear yard of our West Village townhouse that’s defined by birch trees and a trellis, and this huge vine that was encroaching from the neighbor—instead of cutting it back and eliminating it from the yard, she actually incorporated it into the space.”
Jeffrey Murphy
Murphy Burnham & Buttrick Architects 

“Joe DeCeglie from William Vitacco Associates is helpful in every step of the way. He provides clear interpretations, and professional assistance to help resolve every issue in every phase.”
Stephen Luk
BBG-BBGM 

Viridian helped us on Riverhouse to make sure we were meeting Battery Park City’s energy requirements. We were able to subvert the 60-to-40 masonry-to-glass ratio by showing that a double curtain wall system would be more energy efficient than a traditional masonry wall.”
Brian Slocum
Polshek Partnership Architects 


greenwich village townhouse by murphy burnham & buttrick architects with robin key landscape design
 
Kevin Chu/KCJP
 
 

Levien & Company had a really great way of keeping the team going. They kept us together at crunch times, bottlenecks, and tough building conditions.”
Annabelle Selldorf
Selldorf Architects 

Building Conservation Associates are preservation specialists. They helped us to interpret the history of Lion House—the narrative behind it—as well as helped us with the technical issues of disassembling and reassembling different aspects of the building.”
Sylvia Smith
FXFowle 

Aria is doing everything at our Chelsea townhouse: the furniture, the facades—everything. Clive Hawkins just does it on his computer and we take it straight to production. He’s actually a car designer, though superhero is more like it.”
Winka Dubbeldam
Archi-Tectonics

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Other Services and Suppliers

Double Crown by AvroKO with Synchro
Yuki Kuwana

 

COLOR

Donald Kaufman Color
336 West 37th St., New York
212-594-2608
www.donaldkaufmancolor.com

CUSTOM FABRICATION

Associated Fabrication
72 North 15th St., Brooklyn
718-387-4530
www.associatedfabrication.com 

F Product
250 St. Marks Ave., Brooklyn
917-202-2349
www.fproduct.net 

FIT Fabrication
310 Colfax Ave.
Clifton, NJ
973-685-7344 

Kenneth J. Herman
151 Dixon Ave.
Amityville, NY
631-789-4646
www.kennethjhermaninc.com 

Lancaster Knives
165 Court St.
Lancaster, NY
800-869-9666
www.lancasterknives.com 

Material Process Systems
87 Richardson St., Brooklyn
718-302-3081
www.materialprocess.com 

Showman Fabricators
47–22 Pearson Pl.
Long Island City
718-935-9899
www.showfab.com 

SITE NY
49 Bogart St., Brooklyn
718-366-7483
www.siteny.net 

Synchro
338 Berry St., Brooklyn
718-384-2096
www.synchro-pm.com

DECORATIVE FINISHES

David Higginbotham/Art Tech Decor
122 Ludlow St., New York
646-691-5017 

ELECTRICIAN

Pinnacle Electric
130–45 91st Ave.
Richmond Hill, NY
718-846-6200

EXCAVATION

Euro Excavation
976 McLean Ave.
Yonkers, NY
914-668-4616

MATERIALS CONSERVATION

Integrated Conservation Resources
41 East 11th St., New York
212-947-4499
www.icr-icc.com

MODELMAKER/RENDERER

IO Media
91 Fifth Ave., New York
212-352-1115
www.io-media.com

radii
66 Willow Ave.
Hoboken, NJ
201-420-4700
www.radiiinc.com

Saleh & Dirani
155 West 29th St., New York
212-736-8338 

Situ Studio
20 Jay St., Brooklyn
718-237-5795
www.situstudio.com

PAINTING & PLASTERWORK

EverGreene Painting Studios
450 West 31st St., New York
212-244-2800
www.evergreene.com 

Fine
1160 Rt. 22 West
Mountainside, NJ
908-301-1040
www.finepainting.com 

JM Painting Contractors
13 Bedford Dr.
Matawan, NJ
732-566-1272 

L & L Painting Company
900 South Oyster Bay Rd.
Hicksville, NY
516-349-1900
www.llpaint.com 

PLASTICS

3form
520 8th Ave., New York
212-627-0883
www.3-form.com 

Abet
60 West Sheffield Ave.
Englewood, NJ
800-228-2238
www.abetlaminati.com 

Foiltec
13 Green Mountain Dr.
Cohoes, NY
518-783-0575
www.foiltec.de 

Panelite
315 West 39th St., New York
212-947-8292
www.e-panelite.com 

Sandhill Plastics
119 W. 19th St.
Kearney, NE
308-236-5025
www.sandhillplastics.com 

Veritas/Robin Reigi
48 West 21st St., New York
212-924-5558
www.veritasideas.com 

PRINTING

Bio Graphix Digital
302 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn
866-441-4635
www.biographixdigital.com 

Duggal
29 West 23rd St., New York
212-924-8100
www.duggal.com 

SOLAR & SCREENING

AltPower
125 Maiden Ln., New York
212-206-0022
www.altpower.com

Colt International
New Lane, Havant
Hampshire, UK
+44-23-9245-1111
www.coltinfo.co.uk 

STEEPLEJACK

Vertical Access
P.O. Box 4135, Ithaca, NY
607-257-4049
www.vertical-access.com 

TECH SUPPORT

Control Group
233 Broadway, New York
212-343-2525
www.controlgroup.com 

Sinu
285 West Broadway, New York
212-380-1230
www.sinu.com 

Valiant
307 7th Ave., New York
646-775-2771
www.valiant-ny.com 

TENT FABRICATOR

J. Miller Canvas
2429 South Birch St.
Santa Ana, CA
714-641-0052
www.jmillercanvas.com

 


macondo by crÈme design with f product
 
COURTESY crÈme design

 

east harlem school by peter l. gluck & partners with euro excavation
 
COURTESY plgp
 
 

Donald Kaufman makes his own paint. White being my favorite, I’m really difficult with color, but I always come to terms with him very quickly. He comes up with solutions, and I always think how I wouldn’t have been able to do that.”
Annabelle Selldorf
Selldorf Architects 

F Product did the gel pads for our stools at Macondo. The gel seats which we had them produce can be used as a top of a bar stool or an ottoman. We have worked with them on several occasions and they have the most interesting materials.”
Jun Aizaki
crème design 

David Higginbotham just keeps blowing our minds. We try not to tell him what we want and just try to get him to give us his ideas. At Thompson LES hotel we put a photo lithograph of stills from a Warhol Factory film by Gerard Malanga onto the tile at the bottom of the pool, and David even made sure the grout between the tiles matched to the image precisely.”
Ed Rawlings
Rawlings Architects 

“The East Harlem School site was fairly mushy and just in terms of staging everything and working with the concrete guy, the digger, Euro Excavation, really saved the day. We had a lot of dewatering to do and they pumped the water to the other side of the site and let it percolate down, which means we didn’t have to have a dewatering sub. That probably saved the project $35,000.”
Marc Gee
Peter L. Gluck & Partners 

“Some of the more striking elements in JWT are the tent elements, and the people we worked with on them really deserve credit—J. Miller Canvas. Jim Miller is a guy who is endlessly entertained by a challenge. We touch base early on in the process and outline our ideas for the project, and in tandem we come up with a solution. We’re really enthusiastic about him.”
Neil Muntzel
Clive Wilkinson Architects 


volcom by CCS architecture and site construction
 
COURTESY volcom
 
 

“The one person I would love to get listed as one of the best in New York is a specialty fabricator named Chris Larkin, who has a shop called Synchro in Williamsburg. In my rolodex, under job title, I have him listed as “bad ass,” and that’s about the best description of him. He has a metal machine shop as well as a wood shop, but what he really has is an ability to pretty much build anything with an unquenchable thirst for solving the unsolvable. I tell you, the man works miracles, I even saw him turn water into wine once. No joke, it was delicious.”
Adam Farmerie
AvroKO 

Site Construction produced solid results at Volcom. They didn’t compromise quality when speed and tight deadlines were a factor. Their experience was evident when value engineering and change orders were necessary, as they found ways to keep the project within budget while preserving design integrity vital to the success of the project.”
David Winston
CCS Architecture

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R.I.P. Z Train
As if last night's hearing about the MTA's "austerity budget" wasn't scary enough, the Straphangers Campaign held a mock funeral today for the Z Train to drive the point home, complete with a memorial wreath and a bagpiper playing taps below Fulton Street in Lower Manhattan. The transit advocacy group chose the line especially because it meant many commuters on the J Line would see their commutes rise upwards of an hour. "Dearly beloved, we are gathered here to ask Governor David Paterson and state legislative leaders to spare the Z Line from extinction by voting new state aid for the transit system,” Gene Russianoff, staff attorney for the group, said by way of eulogy.  “It’s curtains for the Z unless Albany comes to the rescue.  If not, the Z will buried.” Though the Z may be most emblematic of the severe cutbacks the MTA is proposing, it is certainly not the only line affected. Service on the G Line will be cut short, the R Train will skip three stations at night, and like the Z, the W will cease to be. Additionally, four bus lines will close and 11 others will cease night service, as well as longer waits for buses and trains at night and reduced staffing at stations. The MTA is currently holding hearings on the new budget, which would take affect in July if a new funding stream cannot be established, such as congestion pricing or East River Bridge Tolls. There are seven more hearings planned in the coming weeks. Russianoff was joined at the funeral by two of the three borough presidents affected by the changes, Scott Stringer of Manhattan and Marty Markowitz of Brooklyn. "The demise of the Z Train is a somber matter--and not only to namesake rapper Jay-Z--but also because it represents a more serious problem," Stringer said. Not to be outdone, Markowitz cracked wise his most beloved borough. "Friends, New Yorkers, straphangers, I come to praise the Z train, not to bury it," he quipped. "Though the Z begins in Queens and ends in Manhattan, it is--like the J--Brooklyn to the core. When trains like the Z die, our city’s economy dies with them. This is why we grieve at this mock funeral today. Let’s hope these are not the Z’s last rights. Long live the Z!" But the high--or low, depending on your reverence--point of the whole affair was Russianoff's recital of a Z-centric version of Psalm 23:
“The MTA is my conductor; the Z Train shall not want … (hopefully). Transit officials maketh the J and Z skip-stop during rush hours, providing faster trips. They leadeth the J and Z quickly in the path from Jamaica, Queens to lower Manhattan. But now the MTA sayeth it is very broke and must still the Z, and addeth an hour more a week commuting time for many riders.” “Yea, though the Z walks through the valley of the shadow of death, it will fear no MTA plan: For thou art with the Z, Governor David Paterson. Thy leadership and thy budget staff, they comfort Z riders. Thou preparest new revenue proposals to stop the death of the Z; thou annointest the Z’s wheels with oil; the Z’s subway cars runneth over. Surely goodness and mercy shall follow the Z in all its days and the Z will dwell in the house of MTA subway tracks forever.”
And, lo, I could hearth yon groaning over mine Wifi.
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Nervi's New Look
Upgrades to the terminal are likely to leave Nervi's famed rooftop silhouette intact.
STV/Courtesy PANYNJ

The George Washington Bridge Bus Terminal is Italian maestro Pier Luigi Nervi’s sole New York building, and though thousands pass beneath it every day, it’s familiar to only a few. The Port Authority station sits astride the Trans-Manhattan Expressway, where it slips below grade between 178th and 179th streets, just east of the bridge’s Manhattan landing. With buses serving northern New Jersey and beyond, it is a transit hub whose commercial potential has never quite been met, and whose architectural character is easy to miss beneath 45 years of accumulated grunge.

The Port Authority is trying to change all that. In October they released a proposal for a major overhaul aimed at giving the terminal improved services and a lot more retail space. More recently, local political leaders, current retail tenants, and members of the preservation community have sought to influence the redesign, even as the Port Authority plans to begin construction late this year.

“Our aim is to provide a better retail experience for people who live in the Washington Heights area,” said Port Authority spokesman Steve Coleman. The plan as originally announced called for the relocation of several of the small retailers presently on site; after a mid-November meeting with community leaders, the Port Authority revised and clarified that plan, stating that rather than a single big box anchor, a number of new stores would occupy the renovated facility.

The Port Authority will fund a third of the $150 million budget, with developers P/A Associates and Arcadia Realty Trust responsible for the remainder. The developers have selected Robert Davidson of design/build firm STV as project architect, and the choice would appear to be a significant one: Davidson planned the new transit hub for Ground Zero, and he helped select Santiago Calatrava to build the PATH station there. Calatrava has cited the Nervi bus terminal as a major inspiration for his design.

That connection, however, offers no certain measure of how deferential the redevelopment will be towards Nervi’s structure. And P/A’s Carolyn Malinsky gave a qualified assessment of the building, saying that “the Nervi roof is not actually a historical structure,” while insisting the redevelopment would leave the award-winning concrete coffers intact.

That much appears confirmed by the renderings: Save for a realignment of the arrival concourse to provide for more buses, the upper portion, with its winged silhouette, is unchanged. The lower level, meanwhile, will be glassed in, with all buses arriving on the deck above. The Modern Architecture Working Group, a preservation advocacy organization, has been lobbying both city and state landmarks agencies to insure that the building remains true, in its entirety, to the original 1963 design. But as Group co-chair Michael Gotkin observed, “we’ve been pushing for them to landmark the building for ten years. It’s only since the reconstruction was announced that we got a real response.”

Nervi fans may be interested to know that the architect designed one other major public work on the East Coast, an arena in Norfolk, Virginia known as the Norfolk Scope. A near-replica of Nervi's arena for the 1960 Summer Olympics in Rome, the structure, designed with local architects Williams and Tazewell, opened in 1971 and was awarded the 2003 Virginia Society of the American Institute of Architects' "Test of Time" award.
 


The terminal's overhaul will feature glassed-in retail space at street level.
STV/Courtesy PANYNJ 
 
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Ground Zero's Vanishing Ghost
The shrouded edifice of 130 Liberty Street still looms large--both physically and psychically--over Ground Zero.
Matt Chaban

Since it claimed the lives of two firefighters a little over a year ago, the 26-story ghost at 130 Liberty Street has barely moved behind its black shroud of construction netting. Or so it would appear. And while it is true the building has yet to shed any more of the 40 floors that have been in deconstruction as a result of damage sustained on 9/11, workers for LVI Services have, since May, been quickly, if carefully, cleaning and remediating the tons of toxic material that accumulated within the troubled building.

That job is nearly finished, city and construction officials said Friday during a city council hearing on progress at the site. Facade removal, in addition to the remediation, should be complete by April, at which point the building’s structure can resume its disappearing act. Barring unforeseen setbacks, the building, long a bitter reminder of the area’s tragic past, will be gone by October.

“Halloween ’09, that’s the treat, right?” asked council member Alan Gerson, chair of the Lower Manhattan Redevelopment Committee, which held the hearing. “It’s not a trick?”

“That’s the goal,” responded Lower Manhattan Development Corporation president Richard Emil, one of a dozen people Gerson grilled about the project over the course of six hours.

One issue Gerson was unable to discuss—to his seeming consternation—was the criminal charges recently brought against the employees of the project’s general contractor, Bovis Lend Lease, as well as its main subcontractor, the John Galt Corporation. “I’ve been told by my legal counsel that we’ve been asked by the district attorney’s office not to comment publicly about anything prior to the fire,” James Abadie, head of Bovis’ New York office, said at the start of the hearing.

That did not prevent Gerson from making frequent references to a report (.PDF) prepared by the Manhattan District attorney, Robert Morgenthau, which led to the indictment of one Bovis and two Galt employees on December 22. (Morgenthau also charged another Galt employee on January 6 with stealing $1.2 million from the LMDC.)

Generally, the hearing took on a Beckett-like quality, with Gerson pressing for assurances that the site’s operational lapses had been corrected, and his interlocutors assuring him that indeed lapses had been corrected, though they could not comment on what those lapses were. Take this exchange, which has been condensed:

  • Gerson: According to the district attorney’s report, Bovis should no longer be allowed to ensure site safety. Now, how can they be trusted? What’s changed?
  • Emil: Subsequent to the fire, the LMDC has worked with the city to review all aspects of the project to determine what can be done to best protect the community. We feel that the work that has been done adds an important layer of protection.
  • Gerson: But the plan is only as good as enforcement. Pre-fire, the rules and regulations were ignored and not implemented. There was an undeniable, lackadaisical problem. What has changed to give you this new level of confidence in Bovis?
  • Emil: I can’t speak to changes, but we have observed the work of the Bovis safety team on the project, and we believe that the team so far has done a good job.
  • Gerson: In order to safeguard the future, we have to understand what went on in the past.
  • Abadie: Again, I can’t comment on anything from before the fire, but I can say that after we have worked closely with the city and the fire department to enhance safety at the site.

And so on. While there can be little question that the management of the site was insufficient prior to the fire, Bovis has clearly made an effort to ensure such problems do not resurface. Frank Boci, a senior vice president at the company, noted that special security dogs are now employed on the site to ensure that no flammables enter the building. Boci said that a security guard had apparently forgotten to remove a single cigarette from his jacket, and when the dog found it, the guard was immediately fired. “I don’t know what else is possible in enhancing the security,” he said.

Still, Gerson did begrudgingly acknowledge the advances Bovis and the LMDC had made and seemed pleased to hear that the project would be finished soon. (After the hearing, he told AN he doubted October was realistic, but did expect deconstruction to be done by the end of the year.)

When a second panel convened, this time representing the mayor’s office, a similar back-and-forth ensued, with Gerson calling for a coordinator for the entire effort (a czar, in the current parlance), and the city’s representatives insisting that, while there is no coordinator, there is plenty of coordination at the site. Both sides agreed to disagree, and thanked each other for their time.

This did not sit well with the final panel, which represented the community. Catherine McVay Hughes, the vice chair of Community Board 1, read off a litany of complaints against the LMDC, saying it had broken most every promise to keep the community abreast of developments at the site. “It is imperative that the remainder of the process be as open and transparent as possible to reduce the likelihood of any future mishaps,” she said.

Joel Kupferman, director of the New York Environmental Law & Justice Project, went so far as to condemn Gerson for working with the city. “Their story is not the whole story,” he said. “They break their promises and ignore their job, and then they come before you and you say you feel fine on the progress. Please, do not congratulate them.”

For his part, Gerson was not fully satisfied with the hearing, and might never be, even after the former Deutsche Bank headquarters is long gone from 130 Liberty Street. “Am I happy? Not entirely—far from it,” he told AN. “We did not get to hear the acknowledgment of the gravity of the problems that existed before the fire. And you’re not going to solve it without acknowledging it.”

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AIA Names 2009 Honor Awards
Grimshaw's Museo del Acero, in Monterey, Mexico, is one of nine winners in the architecture category.
Courtesy AIA

Today the AIA announced 25 outstanding projects in three categories—Architecture, Interiors, and Urban Planning—which exemplify the best work in the field to be celebrated by the 2009 Institute Honor Awards. Without further ado, here are the projects, grouped by category, along with the jury's thoughts as provided by the AIA.

Architecture

The jury for the award was chair David Lake, Lake | Flato Architects; Carlton Brown, Full Spectrum of New York; Michael B. Lehrer, Lehrer Architects; James J. Malanaphy, III, The 160 Group, Ltd; Paul Mankins, Substance Architecture Interiors Design; Anna McCorvey, director, AIAStudents Northeast Quad; Anne Schopf, Mahlum Architects; Suman Sorg, Sorg and Associates; and Denise Thompson, Francis Cauffman.

Project: Basilica of the Assumption—Baltimore
Architect: John G. Waite Associates, Architects
Jury Comments:
The architects expanded the space while making it appear as if the envelope is virtually the same. The jury applauded the efforts of mending our ways to restore, respect, and give new life to buildings by significant architects who are so important to the profession.

Project: Cathedral of Christ the Light—Oakland
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Jury Comments: The project contains layers of symbolism. There is a sense of community and openness. The space shifts between heaviness and lightness. It is appropriately monumental but a reverie of light and shadow that is a gift to the City of Oakland.

Project: Charles Hostler Student Center – Beirut, Lebanon
Architect: VJAA
Jury Comments: This project uses elements in a thoughtful way to create a rich urban place. Smart use of its surfaces and resources and in keeping with the local conditions. The outdoor spaces are more comfortable because every piece of the building is leveraged to its best advantage. This could have been a monolithic program but instead the architects created an enlivened urban quarters connecting the campus to the water.


Project: The Gary Comer Youth Center—Chicago
Architect: John Ronan Architects
Jury Comments: A true landmark and beloved building. People want to be here and want it to be active all of the time. A new Modernism that uses timeless and topical ideas that look as if they will stand the test of time. Kudos to Gary Comer for giving back to his community and the architects for creating a tribute to his generosity and energy that benefits and uplifts this community.

Project: The Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life—New Orleans
Architect: VJAA
Jury Comments: This project is climate-responsive in six months out of the year in very clever ways. The architect was creative about the functions in the perimeter zones and how they interact with the campus. It changes the perception of what is the heart of the campus.

Project: Museo del Acero—Monterey, Mexico
Architect: Grimshaw
Jury Comments: This is a proud symbol and testament to the steel industry in Monterey, Mexico. The architect brought back the artistry of artifact that was industry and gave it new spirit—embracing steel being made, fabricated, and enlivened.

Project: The New York Times Building—New York
Architect: Renzo Piano Building Workshop
Jury Comments: There is an amazing serenity that emanates from the building in contrast to the chaos of its surroundings.  The building is welcoming to the human at the ground level and wears its transparency proudly. The jury liked the iconography of the building—it looks like lines of print and becomes like reading the Times.


Project: Plaza Apartments—San Francisco
Architect: Leddy Maytum Stacy Architects
Jury Comments: The architecture has become a seminal event in the residents’ lives—residents remember the date they were first allowed to move in. The architect created a series of “events” that happen in the lobby, courtyard, and in every hallway where there’s light—it’s really about optimism, hope, and change and the message that everyone is deserving of light, air, view, beauty, and proportion.

Project: Salt Point House—Salt Point, New York
Architect: Thomas Phifer and Partners
Jury Comments: I believe this house makes a statement to living in a simple and sustainable way. The owners wanted to connect with nature, tread lightly on the landscape, and be able to relax.

Interior Architecture

The jury for the award was chair Mark Sexton, Kruek & Sexton Architects; Joan Blumenfeld, Perkins + Will; Elizabeth Knibbe, Quinn Evans Architects; Arvind Manocha, Los Angeles Philharmonic Association; Kevin Sneed, OTJ Architects.


Project: Barclays Global Investors Headquarters—San Francisco
Architect:
STUDIOS Architecture
Jury Comments:Very handsome, using wood and colored glass to great effect; the lighting is imaginative, and the relationship to the base building is resolved well. For a large office project, the architect showed an amazing amount of creativity and vibrancy. The lighting is frequently unexpected. The thinking about the use of light is out of the box and playful in what is not a playful project type.

Project: Chronicle Books – San Francisco
Architect:    Mark Cavagnero Associates
Jury Comments: Nice relationship to the existing structure. The jury applauded the sustainability efforts and the effort to bring light in. The reuse of the core structure space—concrete floors, etc.—is quite effective and was done in a very subtle way. On the ground floor, the building structure is revealed to great effect.

Project: The Heckscher Foundation for Children—New York City
Architect: Christoff:Finio architecture
Jury Comments: Without losing the original character of the building, this renovation transforms it. This is a difficult design problem solved elegantly. The narrow nature of the townhouse becomes a framework for beautifully composed public spaces that flow seamlessly. By linking them together the observer never has the feeling of being between the two long and dark party walls.


Project: IFAW World Headquarters—Yarmouth Port, Ma.
Architect: designLAB architects
Jury Comments: From the initial selection of a brownfield site through the design of the spaces to the selection of materials, this project is a successful example of sustainable design. The reference to wooden boat making and craftsmanship is particularly successful to the design inside and out.

Project: Jigsaw—Washington, D.C.
Architect: David Jameson Architect
Jury Comment: This project seems designed from the inside out with the users’ experience in mind. An enormous amount of thought was given to the individual users as to their experience inside the house. Natural light enters into each space in two to three different ways. Care was given to the optimal experience of moving from room to room.

Project: R.C. Hedreen—Seattle
Architect: NBBJ
Jury Comments: The richness of detailing juxtaposed against the heft of the historic concrete structure was gutsy and effective. Creating a corporate interior that has such a completely unique aesthetic is rare and wonderful.

Project: School of American Ballet—New York       
Architect: Diller Scofidio + Renfro
Jury Comments: This project floats like the dancers who use it. There is an ethereal quality of design and materials that relates directly to the users. The quality of light is wonderful. Muscular architecture; beautiful concept.

Project: Sheila C. Johnson Design Center—New York
Architect: Lyn Rice Architects
Jury Comments: The architect uses the design to display the students and their work to give the campus its identity. Nice respect of historic façade while giving the school a clearly contemporary identity.  Youthful, vibrant, dynamic! This project is hitting on all cylinders; it captures the energy of the student environment.


Project:
Tishman Speyer Corporate Headquarters—New York City
Architect: Lehman Smith McLeish
Jury Comments: The design was very well done. It pays respect to the historic design and created a Modern design that is respectful of the original space. The architecture doesn’t compete with art work; it respects it without being a white box.

Project: Town House—Washington, D.C.
Architect: Robert M. Gurney
Jury Comments: This is a terrific project! It takes the typology of town house and opens it up, creating wonderful spaces and vistas. The materials and aesthetic is new and fresh, using bold color and simple materials without being cartoonish. It is a unique and imaginative take on a well-known design problem. It is refreshing to see how a traditional town house can be transformed through bold moves by a very talented architect.

Urban Planning

The jury for the award was chair Jonathan Marvel, Rogers Marvel Architects; Samuel Assefa, Chicago Department of Planning and Development; Tim Love, Utile; Ivenue Love-Stanley, Stanley Love-Stanley; and Stephanie Reich, Glendale Planning Division.

Project: Between Neighborhood Watershed & Home—Fayetteville, Arkansas
Architect:
University of Arkansas Community Design Center
Jury Comments: This greenfield development seems to fit in Fayetteville, particularly by Habitat in a scheme that truly employs innovative sustainable techniques in its management of all surfaces, integrated parking, circulation, and open space. The site plan configuration achieves a level of density balanced by usable and varied open space, and the buildings are more varied than a typical Habitat development.

Project: The Central Park of the New Radiant City—Guangming NewTown, China
Architect: Lee + Mundwiler Architects
Jury Comments: This project is beautiful and ingenious. Particularly, the attention to the existing landscape and topography as integral to the project by utilizing the existing hills as a structured landscape to return to nature, while the natural runoff becomes a body of water is a simple idea with a conceptual clarity to make it truly memorable.


Project:
Foshan Donghuali Master Plan – Guangdong, China
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Jury Comments: The plan shows a variety of uses, scales and densities and open spaces that will serve to integrate the district with the surrounding city fabric.  The proposal includes a set of guidelines for a variety of scales, heights and streetfront types that will enable implementation over time.

Project: Orange Country Great Park – Irvine, California
Architect:
TEN Arquitectos
Jury Comments: The project utilizes the underlying axis of the former airport, and juxtaposed the new gorge with a sensible structure of circulation for cars and people and placement of buildings. The use of the former runway as an inspiration and opportunity as a supergraphic creates an urban poetic gesture at a larger scale.

Project: Southworks Lakeside Chicago Development—Chicago
Architect: Sasaki Associates, Inc.,  Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Jury Comments: A formidable effort and comprehensive plan for a new neighborhood with a variety of districts. These districts are composed of different grains and densities allowing for varied economies, housing types, and uses. The welcome irregularities in the plan resulting from well-considered view corridors and idiosyncrasies in surrounding fabric create a wide variety of experiences and places.

Project: Treasure Island Master Plan – San Francisco
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Jury Comments: An urban design strategy that is sustainable by its very nature.  The project employs an inventive use of solar and wind pattern that generated an urban plan with diagonal grid to protect public spaces from the inhospitable winds.  Other sustainable design strategies include an organic farm, wind turbines, location of open spaces as reconstructed wetlands.

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All Consuming
Matter's Mobile Home Dutch Dollhouse (details below).
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Protest: Sam Hall Kaplan
Courtesy Palazzo Westwood Village

After two decades of contentious community debate and fierce parochial politics, a major mixed-use development, Palazzo, has opened its doors in Westwood Village. Let the debates continue, for if nothing else, the project points to a disturbing drift in the design world, where heralded mixed-use projects do not necessarily translate into accessible urbanity as promised, but rather into economically isolating banality—at least in this less than inspiring instance.

Woe to Westwood, now promoting as its new heart the Palazzo’s 350 luxury apartments, an array of gilt-edge amenities, a cavernous 1,252-space garage, and 50,000 square feet of mostly high-end retail and restaurants. Shoe-horned onto the four-plus acre site and shrouded in a nauseating canary yellow, the heavily hyped development has all the charm of an extended-stay mid-city hotel residence. It is more citadel than community.

A Casden Properties conceit, it was designed with an experienced if predictable hand by the venerable firm of Van Tilburg Banvard & Soderburgh in the all-too-familiar Spanish colonial style that has carpeted swaths of sprawling Southern California over the last quarter century.

To be sure, the apartments seem to work, deftly maximizing light and air in limited interiors in no fewer than 17 different floor plans. The now-standard gourmet kitchens replete with granite countertops and spacious closets are attractive. But the attempt to clad the exterior in an Andalusian mode of bygone Westwood is more boorish than Moorish. The detailing that distinguishes the style is just not there, no doubt a budget consideration by the infamously cost-conscious CEO Alan Casden, with whom Van Tilburg has worked before.

The project’s aggressive sales pitch may play off of the cultural attractions and conveniences of the adjacent UCLA megacosm, but with rents in the $4 per square foot per month range—one bedrooms are listed starting at $2,940, two bedrooms at $3,875—the Palazzo is more in tune with NYU and New York real estate prices than LA’s. And let us not forget the rock climbing wall and concierge service. We are talking here of “a secluded five-star resort with the advantages of stepping out your door into a vibrant and dynamic cityscape,” in the words of Casden that hint at [Grove developer Rick] Caruso envy.

How “dynamic” that cityscape will be is questionable. Clearly, neither Palazzo’s residences and retail nor its streetscaping are designed to serve the penny-pinching, poor-tipping college crowd that in the past so animated Westwood and made it particularly attractive to that forever-18 crowd. Especially fun were the weekend nights when the village’s array of first-run landmark movie theaters existed. For a while, it was LA’s premier pedestrian scene.

But that scene has long languished, following several nasty incidents over the past few decades that prompted a security-concerned UCLA to try to keep its students on campus by providing more on-site housing and diversions. Meanwhile, the obtrusive wannabe Bruin teenagers from the Valley who used to hang out in the village flocked to Santa Monica’s Third Street Promenade and elsewhere to act out.

Casden was quite direct in his remarks at the opening, declaring that the hope of the Palazzo is that it will attract deep-pocketed residents and visitors to the faded village, and spur its revitalization and property values, even in these tough times. Echoing this hope for a new community in Westwood of “new people and new top-tier retailers” was Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, ever alert to both old and new campaign contributors.

Conversely, that heralded revitalization was the paramount fear of those objecting to the project during its protracted planning stage, as they quixotically clung to a nostalgic vision of the area’s past as a comfortable college town catering to both students and the surrounding community of postgraduates and professionals. In addition, the feeling was that Westwood did not need to become a regional attraction to pump up its real estate, and in fact was potentially more valuable as a modest yet distinctive development.

Westwood Village was indeed once a village, designed in a fanciful Spanish style and in a suburban spirit to serve a burgeoning Los Angeles in the Roaring '20s. Planned by one of the more acclaimed land use designers of the time, Harland Bartholomew, the village was the focal point of a high-end housing tract developed by the Janss Corporation, adjacent to a new campus for UCLA that had outgrown its downtown location. Nevertheless, the hyped development dollars and anticipated local taxes that an ambitious high-end mixed-use project would divert from the adjacent wealthy municipal enclaves of Beverly Hills and Santa Monica was too much for the city of Los Angeles to ignore, even if it meant enduring some raucous public hearings and nasty press and turning its backs on UCLA’s fast-food and fast-forward crowd.

The politically-connected Casden persevered, cheered on by local real estate interests and city economists, who see the village’s future and their profits pinned to high-end development. And if the mixed-use Palazzo doesn’t quite work as hoped, and Westwood slips further into somnolence, perhaps a streetcar going up and down Glendon Avenue would help, just like at the Grove and the Americana. They are all beginning to look the same, anyway.

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150 Greene St.
www.mossonline.com
$180.00
 


 

FLOOR PLAN LUXURY SQUARE PLATTER

Fishs Eddy
889 Broadway
www.fishseddy.com
$32.95
 


 

FRANK GEHRY ON LINE

On why FOG keeps drawing

Esther da Costa Meyer
Yale University Press
yalepress.yale.edu
$29.95
 


 

WOOD BLOCKS PUZZLE OCTAGON

Design Within Reach
142 Wooster Street
www.dwr.com
$65.00
 


 

SOLAR & WIND CHARGER

For recharging your cellphone on the Appalachian Trail

Flight 001
96 Greenwich Avenue
www.flight001.com
$80.00
 


 

FUTURE SYSTEMS FLATWARE

Whole service, including zoomy shot glasses

Alessi Soho
130 Greene Street
www.future-systems.com
$352.00
 


 

THINKING OF YOU NOW

Pop-up vase by baroque-ster Tord Boontje

Artecnica
www.artecnicainc.com
$46.00
 


 

HUMIDIFIER

Matter
227 Fifth Avenue
Brooklyn
www.mattermatters.com
$55.00
 


 

BORN CRUCIAL MILK 2% YO-YO

YoYoNation
www.YoYoNation.com
$59.99


 

 

I AM NOT A PAPER CUP

I am a ceramic vase

MoMA Design Store
11 West 53rd Street
www.momastore.org
$20.00 

Placeholder Alt Text

Unveiled: Linden Hotel
Courtesy Lang Architecture

The industrial buildings of Brooklyn’s rough-edged East New York neighborhood inform the design of the planned Linden Hotel. The use of polycarbonate panels, clear glass, expanded metal mesh, and stucco cladding creates a varied composition of translucency, transparency, reflectivity, and opacity, qualities that change over the course of the day. Designed by Lang Architecture, the 30-room hotel, which includes a sky-lit central atrium, will be priced for budget travelers, as it is located in relative proximity to John F. Kennedy Airport, and should appeal to “neighborhood vacationers,” according to principal Drew Lang. The developer, who owns another budget hotel in the area, thinks design could make the Linden stand out from the competition, rather than, say, loud roadside signage. 

For Lang, the hotel represents his first built project in New York (he has built several in his native Gulf Coast region), which is something of a surprise to him. “I’d never thought of working in this section of Brooklyn, but if you share a vision with your client and your contractor, you can build good architecture almost anywhere,” he said.

Architect: Lang Architecture
Client: Sam Patel
Location: East New York, Brooklyn
Completion: late 2009