Search results for "MTA"

Placeholder Alt Text

Peek inside New York City's newest, and endlessly delayed, subway station
In entirely expected news, the extension of the 7 line subway to Manhattan's Far West Side has been delayed yet again. The New York Times reported that the new 34th Street station, which was scheduled to open by the end of 2013, and then by the summer of 2014, won't actually be ready until July. What's the latest hold up? Well, apparently, the station's diagonal elevator has been causing some problems, and the MTA still needs to test the fire alarm, communication system, escalators, ventilation fans, and third-rail power. So, a lot still needs to happen before the public can ride the rails. In the meantime, the MTA tucked some pretty pictures inside a recent report to its board to prove that it is making progress on the station—right, the station that was supposed to open in 2013. Anyway, take a look below to see what New Yorkers will finally be able to enjoy this July, or whenever this thing opens. [h/t CityLab]
Placeholder Alt Text

Sandhogs continue to make progress on New York City's enormous $11 billion East Side train tunnel
New York City's MTA has posted another collection of East Side Access construction photos to remind New Yorkers that its majorly delayed and hugely over budget project is still actually chugging along. When East Side Access is ultimately completed, at the cost of nearly $11 billion, it will connect Long Island Rail Road trains to Grand Central making life easier for about 80,000 commuters. But that's a long ways off—last we heard, the project will not be completed until 2023. As for where the project currently stands, the MTA explained in a statement, "Work continues on the Manhattan side of the East Side Access Project below Grand Central Terminal with waterproofing, rebar arch installation and drilling for couplers. In addition, temporary shoring for concrete slabs that will make up track and room levels can be seen." To see for yourself, take a look at the photos below which were captured by the MTA deep beneath city streets.
Placeholder Alt Text

MTA Off Track: Record ridership just one of the problems facing New York City transit
Overcrowding on New York City subway trains is becoming a major problem for commuters. According to new data from the MTA, there were 14,843 weekday delays caused by overcrowding in December alone. The New York Post found that the number is up 113 percent from the same period a year ago. Fixing the overcrowding will not be easy for the MTA as it is trying to accommodate record ridership and still dealing with damage from Superstorm Sandy.
Placeholder Alt Text

How the Koch brothers helped stop Nashville's plan for Bus Rapid Transit
The plan to build Nashville’s first-ever bus rapid transit (BRT) system is dead and the billionaire Koch Brothers helped kill it. The Tennessean is reporting that after months of controversy, the city has ceased all planning efforts for the Amp, a 7-mile BRT system that would have connected Nashville’s neighborhoods and given the city one of its first major pieces of smart mass-transit policy. Like many major public transit projects, the Amp had its detractors from the beginning. In Nashville, a local auto mogul, limousine company owner, and attorney joined forces to form “Stop Amp”–a group dedicated to pressuring the city into pulling the plug on the plan. That coalition was reinforced by Republican lawmakers and, yes, the Koch brothers. In March, the Tennessean reported that the state chapter of the brothers’ right-wing political advocacy group Americans For Prosperity (AFP) helped create a bill that would “make it illegal for buses to pick up or drop off passengers in the center lane of a state road.” It was a thinly veiled attempt at killing the Amp outright. AFP’s Tennessee director, Andrew Ogles, told the newspaper that the Kochs’ organization didn’t funnel money toward the cause; rather, “the [anti-Amp] bill grew out of a conversation he had had with Senator Jim Tracy, the sponsor.” A compromise bill that was pushed by the mayor softened that language and allowed the plan to move forward. But still, the plan to give Nashville its first bus rapid transit system failed. With the Amp dead, city officials say they will be looking for new “transit solutions” for Nashville.                  
Placeholder Alt Text

The New York Times endorses The QueensWay linear park plan
The QueensWay has had a bumpy rollout. In October, when the Trust for Public Land and the Friends of the QueensWay unveiled their plan to transform an abandoned railway in Queens into something like the High Line, they were immediately faced with skepticism and criticism from around the city. That pro-QueensWay plan came with plenty of eye candy courtesy of splashy conceptual renderings from dlandstudio and WXY. This all got people asking why millions of dollars should be spent turning the rails into a fancy park when the rails could be refurbished to provide a useful commuter rail line. But the park plan has had its champions, and the New York Times can now be counted among them. “Of the two tantalizing possibilities—rail or trail—trail now has the upper hand,” wrote the Times’ editorial board in a recent piece praising the plan. It claimed that building the QueensWay would transform “a humdrum stretch of residential-commercial-industrial-whatever with the sylvan graciousness that the High Line brought to the West Side of Manhattan, but on a far bigger scale.” The board explained that the "rail" plan could actually be the more complicated of the two options largely because the project would have to be added onto the MTA's “overflowing, underfunded to-do list.” Instead, wrote the board, build the QueensWay and address commuter needs with dedicated bus lanes. 

Fulton Center

Arup, Grimshaw, James Carpenter Design Associates

David Sundberg / Esto

Zak Kostura

In addition to its daylighting function, the installation conceals large air ducts that draw warm air, or smoke, from the tunnel system and exhaust it out of the building.

Courtesy Arup

The recently opened Fulton Center has brought a scrumptious taste of sexy British high-tech to Lower Manhattan. Subway riders accessing or departing from the Gordian Knot of transit lines that the center serves—2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, N, R, Z—now have the opportunity to pass through a sci-fi fantasy of a pavilion building.

A robust grey metal exoskeletal framework supports the rectilinear glass facade—blast-proof, you understand, and offering a contemporary take on the depth and modularity of downtown New York’s historic cast iron edifices. Elemental granite floors anchor the interior, cluing you into the fact that you are about to descend into the earth. Two upper levels of yet-unoccupied retail and restaurant space hover within the glass box, floated above the ground floor on V-shaped columns with rounded GFRC covers that give the curved volume’s glistening glass walls an outward cant. Passing under the commercial component—a moment of compression—stairs and escalators descend one flight to an intermediate level, and a soaring atrium rises above—the corresponding moment of release.

Roughly circular in plan, the intermediate level offers sightlines up to the street as well as down into the subway system, an excellent position from which to find your direction into, or out of, the rabbit warren of tunnels. At one end, a snaking stairway rises up from the granite floor, curving sensuously around a glass elevator shaft and providing access to the upper levels. Digital screens ring the circular cut in the street-level floor plate, adding another layer of kinetics to an already busy space and more of the sense that you’ve just entered a scene from Neuromancer.

The atrium is bathed in an otherworldly light that filters down from an oculus skylight, some 110 feet above. The light has a diffuse, almost material quality, similar to the fog of light seen in certain James Turrell works. This quality is the result of an optical diffuser/reflector that rings and hangs down from the oculus. Composed of crossing radial stainless steel cables that support diamond shaped aluminum panels, it looks like it could be the glowing interior of a nuclear power plant’s cooling tower.

Entitled Sky Reflector-Net (2013), this $2.1 million component of the architecture is the result of a collaboration between Arup, Grimshaw, and James Carpenter Design Associates. MTA Arts and Design and the MTA Capital Construction Company commissioned the work, along with the whole project, more than a decade ago. In March 2002, in the wake of the destruction of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the MTA hired Arup to conduct a planning study for a downtown transit center. The study, which was delivered four months later in July 2002, got the MTA $847 million in funding from the Federal Transit Administration, part of the huge outlay of cash made available by the Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery.

The building that now stands on the corner of Fulton Street and Broadway is remarkably consistent with the recommendations of the initial study, a primary component of which was the use of daylight as a wayfinding device. Arup performed a solar analysis that established an ideal geometrical relationship between the site, the building, and the oculus to take optimal advantage of the sun’s path throughout the course of the year. One of the chief challenges of the site in this regard is that the street corner faces north, whereas sunlight in this hemisphere comes from the south. In that direction, tall buildings hem in the site. In answer, the oculus rises out of the roof like a chimney, and its low-e coated, insulated glass top is tilted 23½ degrees south, to capture as much light cresting the neighboring buildings as possible. The exterior of the oculus is clad in a stainless steel batten system with a diffusive coating that prevents hotspots and glare.

In February 2004, Carpenter was brought on to work with Arup and Grimshaw on developing a system that would encourage the light captured by the oculus to reach two levels under the ground to the subway system. His studio worked with the architects and engineers on reflection studies and finding a structure and materials for the system. The team eventually decided on a cable net. Made of 316 stainless steel, it attaches at 56 points to gusset plate and tension rod connections on the compression pipe at the top of the oculus, and at 56 points on the atrium structure below. TriPyramid fabricated the 4,000-pound net in its Westford, Massachusetts, facility and drove it to the site on the back of a tilt-bed truck. An installation team from Enclos lifted the net into place using eight individually operated hoists. As cable nets do, when erected and pulled into tension it naturally assumed its cooling tower shape.

Attached to the cable net are 952 1/8-inch-thick, diamond shaped aluminum panels with a mechanically applied anodized coating. Carpenter worked with German optical aluminum company Alanod to develop the coating, which has both diffusive and reflective qualities. The custom finish is now part of Alanod’s product line and is called Scattergloss, an apt name that well describes what happens to light as it lands on Sky Reflector-Net. It works as well for daylight as it does for electric light. At night, 32 metal halide lights grouped at the top of the installation in clusters of four transform the net into a giant lampshade.

The panels are perforated, 80 percent toward the bottom of the net and 20 percent toward the top. This gradient causes the installation to seem to dissolve as it reaches toward the ground. It also allows views to pass through where the net covers the upper atrium floors. As importantly, the perforations provide for the more-or-less unimpeded passage of air. In addition to directing light, the net conceals the large ventilation and smoke-evacuation ducts that ring the upper reaches of the atrium, lending a glowing face to a machine built in the memory and for the prevention of Fulton Center’s tragic historical impetus.

RESOURCES

Cable Net:
TriPyramid
tripyramid.com

Aluminum Panels:
Durlum
durlum.com

Optical Finish:
Alanod
alanod.com

Installer:
Enclos
enclos.com

Commissioned in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Fulton Center brings much-needed clarity to the tangle of subway lines that the station serves. A large part of the wayfinding strategy is Sky Reflector-Net, an art installation that directs daylight captured by the building’s raised oculus two levels under the ground.

Placeholder Alt Text

Fulton Center
David Sundberg / Esto

Arup,
Grimshaw,
James Carpenter Design Associates

The recently opened Fulton Center has brought a scrumptious taste of sexy British high-tech to Lower Manhattan. Subway riders accessing or departing from the Gordian Knot of transit lines that the center serves—2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, J, N, R, Z—now have the opportunity to pass through a sci-fi fantasy of a pavilion building.

A robust grey metal exoskeletal framework supports the rectilinear glass facade—blast-proof, you understand, and offering a contemporary take on the depth and modularity of downtown New York’s historic cast iron edifices. Elemental granite floors anchor the interior, cluing you into the fact that you are about to descend into the earth. Two upper levels of yet-unoccupied retail and restaurant space hover within the glass box, floated above the ground floor on V-shaped columns with rounded GFRC covers that give the curved volume’s glistening glass walls an outward cant. Passing under the commercial component—a moment of compression—stairs and escalators descend one flight to an intermediate level, and a soaring atrium rises above—the corresponding moment of release.

   
Commissioned in the wake of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, Fulton Center brings much-needed clarity to the tangle of subway lines that the station serves. A large part of the wayfinding strategy is Sky Reflector-Net, an art installation that directs daylight captured by the building’s raised oculus two levels under the ground.
David Sundberg / Esto
 

Roughly circular in plan, the intermediate level offers sightlines up to the street as well as down into the subway system, an excellent position from which to find your direction into, or out of, the rabbit warren of tunnels. At one end, a snaking stairway rises up from the granite floor, curving sensuously around a glass elevator shaft and providing access to the upper levels. Digital screens ring the circular cut in the street-level floor plate, adding another layer of kinetics to an already busy space and more of the sense that you’ve just entered a scene from Neuromancer.

The atrium is bathed in an otherworldly light that filters down from an oculus skylight, some 110 feet above. The light has a diffuse, almost material quality, similar to the fog of light seen in certain James Turrell works. This quality is the result of an optical diffuser/reflector that rings and hangs down from the oculus. Composed of crossing radial stainless steel cables that support diamond shaped aluminum panels, it looks like it could be the glowing interior of a nuclear power plant’s cooling tower.

 
Zak Kostura
 

Entitled Sky Reflector-Net (2013), this $2.1 million component of the architecture is the result of a collaboration between Arup, Grimshaw, and James Carpenter Design Associates. MTA Arts and Design and the MTA Capital Construction Company commissioned the work, along with the whole project, more than a decade ago. In March 2002, in the wake of the destruction of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, the MTA hired Arup to conduct a planning study for a downtown transit center. The study, which was delivered four months later in July 2002, got the MTA $847 million in funding from the Federal Transit Administration, part of the huge outlay of cash made available by the Supplemental Appropriations Act for Further Recovery.

Zak Kostura
 

The building that now stands on the corner of Fulton Street and Broadway is remarkably consistent with the recommendations of the initial study, a primary component of which was the use of daylight as a wayfinding device. Arup performed a solar analysis that established an ideal geometrical relationship between the site, the building, and the oculus to take optimal advantage of the sun’s path throughout the course of the year. One of the chief challenges of the site in this regard is that the street corner faces north, whereas sunlight in this hemisphere comes from the south. In that direction, tall buildings hem in the site. In answer, the oculus rises out of the roof like a chimney, and its low-e coated, insulated glass top is tilted 23½ degrees south, to capture as much light cresting the neighboring buildings as possible. The exterior of the oculus is clad in a stainless steel batten system with a diffusive coating that prevents hotspots and glare.

 

RESOURCES

Cable Net:
TriPyramid

Aluminum Panels:
Durlum

Optical Finish:
Alanod

Installer:
Enclos
In addition to its daylighting function, the installation conceals large air ducts that draw warm air, or smoke, from the tunnel system and exhaust it out of the building.
Courtesy Arup
 

In February 2004, Carpenter was brought on to work with Arup and Grimshaw on developing a system that would encourage the light captured by the oculus to reach two levels under the ground to the subway system. His studio worked with the architects and engineers on reflection studies and finding a structure and materials for the system. The team eventually decided on a cable net. Made of 316 stainless steel, it attaches at 56 points to gusset plate and tension rod connections on the compression pipe at the top of the oculus, and at 56 points on the atrium structure below. TriPyramid fabricated the 4,000-pound net in its Westford, Massachusetts, facility and drove it to the site on the back of a tilt-bed truck. An installation team from Enclos lifted the net into place using eight individually operated hoists. As cable nets do, when erected and pulled into tension it naturally assumed its cooling tower shape.

   
Zak Kostura
 

Attached to the cable net are 952 1/8-inch-thick, diamond shaped aluminum panels with a mechanically applied anodized coating. Carpenter worked with German optical aluminum company Alanod to develop the coating, which has both diffusive and reflective qualities. The custom finish is now part of Alanod’s product line and is called Scattergloss, an apt name that well describes what happens to light as it lands on Sky Reflector-Net. It works as well for daylight as it does for electric light. At night, 32 metal halide lights grouped at the top of the installation in clusters of four transform the net into a giant lampshade.

The panels are perforated, 80 percent toward the bottom of the net and 20 percent toward the top. This gradient causes the installation to seem to dissolve as it reaches toward the ground. It also allows views to pass through where the net covers the upper atrium floors. As importantly, the perforations provide for the more-or-less unimpeded passage of air. In addition to directing light, the net conceals the large ventilation and smoke-evacuation ducts that ring the upper reaches of the atrium, lending a glowing face to a machine built in the memory and for the prevention of Fulton Center’s tragic historical impetus.

 

Placeholder Alt Text

2000 Shawnee Mission Parkway
Mike Sinclair

The first time Steven Karbank was aware that his new office property was something special was when he booked a concert there. “We’d blown out the second floor, so it was a complete shell,” recalled Karbank, chairman of the Karbank Real Estate Company, one of Kansas City’s largest developers of industrial buildings. “We happened to have some musician friends in from out of town, and we arranged an impromptu concert on the second floor. We ordered some delicatessen food, had some family in and… Something magical happened that night.”

What happened was that 2000 Shawnee Mission Parkway, an unremarkable 1968 masonry and concrete building in the inner suburb of Mission Woods, Kansas, had shown her secret enchanted side to a developer to see if he would notice. And he did. The parkway seemed to disappear from view as the guests gazed through the single-pane windows, up the leafy residential hills to the south, nothing but soft porch lights as far as the eye could see. Karbank felt he had found a haven right in the middle of one of the region’s most heavily trafficked corridors.

 
 

His plan had been to take the Class C property, a rare foray of his into office development, and make it a LEED-certified Class A space. But he hadn’t seen himself in the picture until that night. Steven’s father, Barney Karbank, had founded the company in 1950, and all that time it had been headquartered in downtown Kansas City, Missouri. “We were on the 39th floor, with pretty much a 365-degree view, but no chance to get fresh air,” said Karbank. But here was an incredibly intimate connection to the outside and a chance to relocate his company much closer to where he, his employees, and many of his clients lived.

By then, architect Kyle Patneau of Kansas City–based RMTA, a longtime collaborator with Karbank, was already executing a design to open up the three-story building. He worked with Principal in Charge Mike Paxton, Pete Baird, and John Renner. “It was pretty depressing inside,” he said of his first walk-through. “You didn’t have any connection to the outside.” On the north end, every other section of brick was replaced with glass. On the south end, the load-bearing masonry was removed entirely and replaced with a curtain wall system. More than 50 percent of the building is now glass.

 

RESOURCES:
Cork rubber flooring
Zandur
Furnishings
Knoll
Vitra
Herman Miller
Custom (manufactured by Square One Studio)
Lighting
Flos
Pinnacle Architectural Lighting
Bamboo decking
PlybooDex
Floor tile
New Mexico Travertine

 

While all of this was going on, the client added a floor for himself. Karbank asked to see the trees; Patneau and Paxton went further, cantilevering the roof 13 feet so the chairman’s office could enjoy a 270-degree view of the canopies. Karbank immersed himself in the project. “We were tweaking design every day through the construction,” he said. “The head of the concrete company had worked on one of my dad’s projects in the 1950s. Many of the subs who worked on the project knew him. So when we said we were naming the building in honor of my dad, they asked, what can we do to get this done?”

   
 

Patneau described Karbank as “a client who demands the absolute best,” yet because of his industrial focus he had never pursued LEED on a project. Still, when the designers suggested a path from LEED Certified to Silver, Karbank said yes. And when Patneau confirmed a micro-generator would easily get the project to Gold, he said yes to that as well. The twin 65-kW Capstone generators go online this month.

The penthouse suite was also designed so that with a light tug on a pocket door and a few rolling planters to serve as a barrier, the fourth floor’s east wing can be rented out as a party space. It is the same space where visitors arrive off the elevator, where they can sit in the modern waiting area and conference room, and have the tree house experience that first captivated Karbank.

“One of my favorite things is to see people’s reactions,” he said. “Even people who live nearby here, have driven by here 10,000 times, have no idea what it is like until they get up here.”

Placeholder Alt Text

In Construction> New York City's East Side Access tunnel dons a yellow raincoat deep underground
Every so often, New York City's MTA shares a batch of construction photos to remind New Yorkers that one of its long-delayed projects is still chugging along beneath their feet. The latest photo set takes us underneath Manhattan where the MTA is busy borrowing tunnels that will one day connect the Long Island Rail Road to Grand Central. The whole project is expected to cost nearly $11 billion and won't be wrapped up until 2023, so no need to rush through the gallery.
Placeholder Alt Text

Sprint Health Accelerator
Mike Sinclair

You already know Silicon Valley, but what about Silicon Prairie? In Kansas City, Missouri, a host of start-ups have followed in the footsteps of Google Fiber’s 1 gigabyte internet service. Seeking to cash in on this synergy, mobile telecommunications giant Sprint partnered with Boulder, Colorado-based Techstars to create its very first (it is Techstars’ 10th similar facility) startup incubator and mentorship program, Sprint Accelerator, that uniquely focuses on mobile health technology.

To meet the challenging demands of this high-intensity collaboration, local firm Rees Masilionis Turley Architecture (RMTA) designed the space with an eye to encourage technological innovation and entrepreneurship.

Located in the heart of Kansas City’s Crossroads Arts District, RMTA’s 12,000-square-foot renovation of a 1903 ice house into a dynamic co-working space truly echoes the mission of its client: creativity, innovation, diversity, and speed to market. “Everything about the space was designed to inspire creativity and collaboration,” said Matt Murphy, project manager for RMTA.

 
The Sprint Accelerator preserved elements of the old building and left them exposed. New insertions combine an informal start-up atmosphere with the polish of an established brand.
 

The walls, countertops, and tabletops of the space function as dry erase boards so that ideas can be jotted down at will. Small gathering spaces act as conversation nodes with comfortable seating and data and power ports to encourage impromptu interactions. The design balances active collaboration areas with space for privacy and relaxation required in such high-intensity work environments. “Sprint desired an environment to inspire and advocate work-life balance; a place where people would want to be,” said Murphy.

To that end, the space includes the toys that 21st Century tech companies use to attract Millennials: shuffleboard, beer taps, foosball, ping pong, etc. It also includes a confessional room to vent after working 40 hours straight and a historic telephone booth painted Sprint yellow and modified with all the latest gadgets for those times when you just want to lock yourself in a box and work alone.

 

RESOURCES:
Hardware
Hafele
Furnishings

Bludot
Coalesse
Haworth
Kimball Office
Knoll
Steelcase
Lighting
Flos
Pinnacle Architectural Lighting
Plumbing fixtures
Blanco

 

RMTA left the building’s original brick, timber beams, and hardwood floors exposed. Building on this industrial loft theme, the stud framing was left open and translucent polycarbonate panels are used to divide the space while allowing natural daylight to filter through.

Modern accents were added with furnishings, hexagonal floor tiles acting as wayfinding through the subtle use of gradation and color, and a twist on corporate branding with the Sprint logo relief cut out of the drywall. “We knew we had to make a delicate, modern design incision within the space that would not overwhelm the history of the building,” explained Murphy.

The real test of the space is the hardware and software that the startups create within it. The first crop of 10 select startups graduated after their rigorous three-month program this past summer and two of the companies relocated to Kansas City after connecting with financial and professional backing. The sophomore class is set to begin in the spring of 2015.

Placeholder Alt Text

Video> Installing James Carpenter's Sky Reflector-Net at the Fulton Center
Earlier this week, AN went inside the recently completed, $1.4 billion Fulton Center in Lower Manhattan. As we mentioned, the station connects nine subway lines and is centered around a real show-stopper of an oculus. That massive skylight is wrapped in the Sky Reflector-Net, a 4,000-pound, James Carpenter–designed, structure that uses aluminum panels to disperse light throughout the station. Check out the video below to see how the MTA strung-up the high-tech net.
Placeholder Alt Text

Pictorial> The new Fulton Center opens in Lower Manhattan
When the new Fulton Center opened this weekend—after seven years of delays and cost overruns that lifted the project’s price tag from $750 million to $1.4 billion—New York City got two things: a modern upgrade to its transportation network and an iconic piece of architecture. With new well-lit concourses, pedestrian tunnels, escalators and elevators, and more intuitive transfer points between nine subway lines, Fulton Center will drastically improve the transit experience for the 300,000 people who pass through it every day. But even with these significant improvements, all anyone is talking about is the center's eye-catching glass oculus and its hyperboloid Sky Reflector-Net installation. Step inside the station, and you'll understand why. The 53-foot-diameter structure was commissioned by the MTA Arts & Design program and created by James Carpenter Associates with Grimshaw Architects, Enclos, TriPyramid Structures, and ARUP. It is comprised of 952 aluminum panels, 224 high-strength rods, 112 tension cables, and 10,000 stainless-steel components that work in tandem to fill the station with natural light. The full effect of the design can only be experienced from within the station—standing across the street from Fulton Center, which appears as a steel and glass headhouse, the oculus and Sky Reflector-Net could be mistaken for a massive vent. The upper floors of the rotunda, which are set directly underneath the oculus, will soon be ringed by shops and restaurants. The 66,000 square feet of commercial space is connected to the station through a prominent glass elevator that is wrapped in a spiral staircase. But as dramatic as all of these large gestures are, the center is completed with the MTA's standard-issue, black and gray finishes. The handrails, doors, flooring, and even garbage cans are what you would find at any other station. The station's subdued color scheme, though, is broken up slightly with the light blue glass tiles that clad the station’s below-grade corridors. In these subterranean spaces, the choice of tile, and the decision to set overheard fluorescent bulbs at an angle, shows the impact that designers can have when deviating—however slightly—from the norm. Spread throughout the new Fulton Center are over 50 digital screens that make up the MTA’s “largest state-of-the-art digital signage media program.” When AN visited the Fulton Center, some of those screens were quickly switching between video art and ads for Burberry. And then back again. The completion of the Fulton Center also comes with the $59 million renovation of the adjacent, 125-year-old Corbin Building. The refurbished space, which boasts a stately exterior, is incorporated into the circulation of the center. Exiting through the Corbin Building–side exit, you can see the wings of the nearly $4 billion, Calatrava-designed World Trade Center Transit Hub. When that station opens next year, it will connect to the Fulton Center, and quite likely overshadow it. The bulk of the funding for this project ($847 million) came from a Congressional appropriation which was aimed at rebuilding transit networks in Lower Manhattan after September 11. An additional $423 million came from President Obama's stimulus act. The MTA also provided $130 million in funds.