Aaron Seward

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Terminal B

Today, The Port Authority awarded a $59.8 million contract to a New Jersey construction company to complete the next phase of work in an ongoing project to modernize Newark Airport's Terminal B. VRH Construction Corp. of Englewood got the job of installing new check-in counters, baggage handling systems, and…
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Decathletes, Start Your Solar Panels

Yesterday was press day at the 2009 U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon in Washington, D.C. The student teams were still scrambling to finish up their installations when Team Archpaper arrived on the scene, but we still managed to talk our way into a hand full of the 20 solar…
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Solar Communications

On the occasion of the 2009 G8 summit in L'Aquila, Italy, architecture firm MDAA (Massimo d'Alessandro & Associati) of Rome designed a photovoltaic tower to power an existing cellular communications aerial. The installation brought to life an idea that has been paddled about quite a bit in recent years:…
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The Bayonne Question

The Port Authority has released a report conducted by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, which points out that the Bayonne Bridge will begin to impose more and more restrictions on commercial shipping. Designed by master bridge designer Othmar Ammann and architect Cass Gilbert and completed in 1931, the…
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Green Tremors

Icarus. The Tower of Babel. We all know what can happen when humans reach too high. Well, apparently reaching too low can also have some negative side effects. In mid-August, a geothermal power plant under construction in Germany set off a trembler that registered at 2.7 on the Richter scale.…
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Imagined Infrastructure

cityLAB, an urban think-tank at UCLA's Department of Architecture and Urban Design, has announced the six finalists of its WPA 2.0 competition. The competition, which stands for working public architecture, invited designers of all stripes to submit proposals for rebuilding our cities' infrastructure as a sort of throwback to…
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Bayou Ball

Construction began last month in Natchitoches, Louisiana, on the Louisana State Sports Hall of Fame and Regional History Museum. "What do sports and regional history have in common?" you might ask. Trahan Architects certainly had to ponder this question when figuring out an elegant way to combine the disparate…
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Euro Bulb Ban Begins

Europe's ban on incandescent light bulbs went into effect today. A New York Times report filed yesterday from Brussels brought home the air of ambivalence that has accompanied the prohibition, relating tales of some Europeans jumping eagerly on the compact fluorescent (CFL) bandwagon, others racing out to stockpile the…
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Art On The Gridiron

Thirty-five years ago in Austin, Texas, Willie Nelson forged an historic accord between the hippies and the rednecks. Today, some 200 miles to the north in Arlington, Texas, Gene and Jerry Jones, owners of the Dallas Cowboys, are forming a similar pact, this time between the artists and…
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Late Is Better Than Never

On Tuesday, after a nearly two-month delay, Zaha Hadid's pavilion honoring the 100th-year anniversary of Daniel Burnham's plan for Chicago finally opened in Millennium Park. The wait—allegedly caused by problems with the project's contractor—was more than made up for by the dynamism of the space, or so thought the
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Fontainebleau Anew

Morris Lapidus' Fontainebleau in Miami is one of the most recognizable hotels in the United States, thanks in no small part to its frequent appearances in television shows and films, perhaps most notably and intimately in the 1964 James Bond movie Goldfinger. A recent two-year revitalization has brought the…