Search results for "yabu pushelberg"

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Going for Gold, eh?

Yabu Pushelberg designs a super-Canadian interior for the Canada Olympic House in Rio
Certain things come to mind when conjuring images of Canada: maple leaves and syrup, poutine, Drake running through "The Six," and Mounties—to name a few. Upon first viewing photos of the Toronto-based Yabu Pushelberg's design for the Canada Olympic House (COH)‚ it's apparent what country the house belongs to (without being too kitschy). The mostly red and white structure features sculptural installations and furniture by Canadian artists and designers. "Our aim is to show the world that Canadian design is progressive and sophisticated. The design for Canada Olympic House is bold, smart, fresh and unexpected," remarked Yabu Pushelberg cofounder George Yabu. Cofounder Glenn Pushelberg also said "The Canada Olympic House design is conceptually powerful and aims to represent all things Canadian with respect to excellence." In an impressive feat, the entire project (assembly and installation) had to be completed in less than two weeks, and will have to be broken down in the same amount of time. The quick turnaround inspired much of the design, which uses simple, low cost materials. The entry features a bold, red 8-foot-high hoarding printed with white lettering that welcomes visitors and leads to a lobby that features a bright white vinyl floor printed with Canadian Olympic Team graphics. In the spiral stairway leading to the second floor is a mobile made of suspended red and white canoe paddles designed by Toronto-based artisans Moss & Lam Art Studios that guides visitors up to the celebration lounge. The lounge is furnished with modular furniture from the Canadian Tire Canvas Collection, which is interspersed with custom made tables by Saint-Damase Furniture. A deconstructed Canadian flag made of  strips of painted canvas, also by Moss & Lam Art Studios, is suspended from the ceiling. The Petro Canada Pantry is stocked with snacks and illuminated by three glowing canoes—custom made by a Canadian artist—alongside vintage photos of Canadian Olympic athletes. In the backyard terrace red and white ombre Muskoka chairs evoke a "quintessential" Canadian yard. Finally, the team store is inspired by a modern log cabin and features goods from Hudson's Bay, which also provided textiles for the project, as well as plenty of #TeamCanada merch.
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Enter by July 9

Seven forward-thinking designs from the 2017 Best of Products Awards
With the 2018 Best of Products Awards entry deadline just around the corner, we wanted to take a moment to remind you of last year's winners. Here we highlight only a handful of the most riveting and forward-thinking winning products from seven categories in the 2017 Best of Products Awards. With groupings that span from HVAC to residential furniture, outdoor to textiles, and smart home systems to facades, there are many opportunities for great designs to be acknowledged. You'll find more information about the various categories and how to enter on the 2018 Best of Products Awards competition page. Good luck and don't wait too long; the deadline is July 9! OUTDOOR PUBLIC

MANGROVE REEF WALLS KVdR Design with Jessene Aquino-Thomas

Approximately half the world population lives in urban areas near coastlines, with coastal armoring reducing native habitats and enabling invasive species to thrive. Mangrove Reef Walls are integrally cast within seawalls to recreate tidal habitats along urbanized waterfronts. The digitally developed mangrove and oyster geometry maximizes surface area and texture variety promoting adherence, growth, and hiding areas for numerous species. Ultimately, these eco-friendly seawall panels may be tuned for a variety of local species.

HVAC

WHISPERRECESSED LED Panasonic

The WhisperRecessed LED is an 80 CFM exhaust fan that hides abaft an LED Recessed Light and disappears behind the ceiling. It is an attractive way to remove moist, polluted air from the home, and it helps to prevent mold and mildew. The architectural-grade recessed light fixture provides powerful yet quiet ventilation.

OPENINGS

PORTAPIVOT 6530 XL Portapivot

With their discreet joinery, these unique room dividers are designed to be mounted on an already finished floor and under a solid or reinforced ceiling surface, without any preinstalled mounting systems. The minimal aluminum frame is designed to be fitted with 6- or 8-millimeter-thick safety glass and is available in three anodized colors: silver, black, and bronze. The axis can be positioned at one-third or in the center, with a configurable swing capacity of 90, 180, or 360 degrees.

TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION MAKERARM Makerarm A beautifully designed robotic arm that’s infinitely customizable, Makerarm is a factory on a desktop. It offers interchangeable tool heads that easily snap on and off, allowing instant conversion from a 3-D printer to a CNC mill to a laser engraver to a pick-and-place machine, among countless other functions, in a matter of seconds. Makerarm rotates 360 degrees and, at over 700 square inches, its work area is one of the largest of any 3-D printer or fabricator on the consumer market. BATH

FONTANE BIANCHE Salvatori + Fantini

A dialogue between circle and square runs through this entire collection from Fantini, created in collaboration with Italian stone company Salvatori. The washbasin is carved from a square marble block, from which a circular hemisphere is extracted. The Fontane Bianche line also includes faucets, showers, and handles.

FACADES

CORSO Innova Tile

This long-format brick presents a new emphasis on the horizontal lines of fine brick installations with its 19.70-inch unit length. The extended shape, the colors, the variations of textures, and the size and position of mortar joints work together to express the modernity of terra-cotta. The architectural ceramic method of production broadens the range of available colors.

RESIDENTIAL INTERIOR FURNISHINGS

MUSHROOM TABLE Yabu Pushelberg for Henge

Designed as complementary pairs, the Mushroom Tables have an unexpected lightness given their all-metal construction with softened, refined edges and rounded corners. The tables’ differences in height and scale are precisely considered, while the process of sand-casting is reflected in both form and finish, exhibiting a handwrought fluidity. The base of each table is more substantial than its top but is mirrored in its form; slender posts change in profile, from circular to square.

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What We Saw

Six quick picks from BDNY 2017
The Boutique Design Trade Fair (BNDY) is the hospitality show, bringing together the industry's interior designers, architects, developers, and experts to see the latest furnishings, lighting, fabrics, wall coverings, flooring, carpeting, bath and spa, and accessories.   We spent one day going to and fro between 600 booths and presentations. Check out a few of our favorites below. Hayon x Nani collection Jaime Hayón for Nanimarquina Spanish designer Jaime Hayón designed a collection of rugs based on hand-drawn sketches for Nanimarquina’s 30th Anniversary. The Paul Klee–like rugs feature curious motifs and figures, including animal heads, abstract shapes, and fluid line work. Grid Collection Warp & Weft for Yabu Pushelberg The first four rugs from a new collaboration between Yabu Pushelberg and Warp & Weft were revealed during BDNY (the remaining eight designs will be released throughout 2018). Inspired by the right angles and geometry of urban topography, principals George Yabu and Glenn Pushelberg softened and simplified the visual narrative of rigid city streets by deconstructing grid-like patterns and transforming them into one-dimensional planes. Spanish industrial design masterminds Miguel Milá and his son Gonzalo Milà created a a sleek rattan outdoor seating collection, available in natural wood and black. Olivio Armchair iSiMAR This expressive armchair is fashioned from polyester powder-coated galvanized steel, and is offered in 24 colors and 5 metal finishes. Cestita Batería Santa & Cole A new wireless adaption of a light fixture originally designed in 1962 by  Spanish designer Miguel Milá is now available as a small rechargeable, portable table lamp. Cestita is encased in a bent wooden structure with a top handle that envelops an opal-shaped orb. Koord El Torrent Designed as a part of the portable division of the collection, these battery-powered luminaires filter light through a woven rope shade creating a venetian blind lighting effect; available in four sizes, a variety of colors, and suitable for outdoor or indoor use.  
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Best of Products Awards

Meet the winners of our 2017 Best of Products Awards!
After hours of carefully deliberating over hundreds of entries for our largest-ever Products Awards, we are excited to share the winning designs. The 15 diverse categories included everything from hardware and furniture to facades, HVAC, and technology. Our amazing team of judges evaluated entries for innovation, aesthetics, performance, and value, selecting one winner and two honorable mentions for each category (we couldn’t choose just one!). Stay tuned next week to meet our honorable mentions. Both winners and honorable mentions are featured in our September issue—out September 6!
The Best of Products Awards Jury:
James Biber Partner, Biber Architects Olivia Martin Managing Editor, The Architect’s Newspaper William Menking Editor in Chief, The Architect’s Newspaper Patrick Parrish Owner, Patrick Parrish Gallery Tucker Viemeister Founder, Viemeister Industries Pilar Viladas Design writer and editor

THE WINNERS

 
Textiles INFINITE NEUTRAL Wolf-Gordon
Interior Residential Furniture
MUSHROOM TABLE
Outdoor Residential
SKYE
Outdoor Public
HVAC
WHISPERRECESSED LED
Facades
CORSO
Smart Home Systems AIO WALL MIRROR Robern
Structural
PROSEAL LE Icynene
Interior Commercial Furniture 
BUZZIFLOAT Alain Gilles for BuzziSpace
Kitchen
HOUSEHOLD RECYCLING COMPACTOR Krushr
Technology & Innovation 
MAKERARM Makerarm
Openings PORTAPIVOT 6530 XL Portapivot
Finishes & Surfaces ULTRA SPEC® SCUFF-X Benjamin Moore
Lighting
INFRA-STRUCTURE FLOS
Bath FONTANE BIANCHE Salvatori + Fantini
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Yuichiro Hori of Stellar Works Weighs In

Why China is absent from the design conversation
Despite its solid economic growth and sizable population (the largest in the world), China is noticeably absent from many conversations and events surrounding design. As numerous publications have pointed out, there was very little representation of China this past year at Milan Design Week and New York Design Week, among others.  To learn more, The Architect’s Newspaper (AN) managing editor Olivia Martin sat down with Yuichiro Hori of Stellar Works, a Shanghai-based design company, to talk about the current design climate in China. Although Hori is Japanese, he found Shanghai to be the best place to launch Stellar Works, a cross-cultural brand that has worked with designers such as Yabu Pushelberg, Space Copenhagen, Neri& Hu, and David Rockwell. Stellar Works has been praised as one of the few companies truly representing China (and Asia in general) in the design fair circuit. The Architect’s Newspaper: Tell me a bit about starting Stellar Works and how you ended up with a factory in Shanghai and a factory in France. Yuichiro Hori: My background is in furniture design, so I was designing my collection without my own factory and I was supposed to be making everything in Japan. The quality of Japanese manufacturing is very good, but the problem is that the factories aren’t very flexible. The Japanese manufacturing mentality is conservative and people hesitate to take on new challenges. This leads to long lead times and high costs. I had lots of ideas for my new collections, but it was difficult to get them done. When I went to China, I was surprised by the large-scale furniture factories with new machines and highly skilled workers—I was very impressed! I started asking some of the Chinese companies to work with me. Ultimately, I set up my own factory in Shanghai, which is an amazing environment: It is innovative and dynamic and international and I am able to find skilled workers easily. So, I moved to Shanghai for my factory there and also started working with the high-end French manufacturing furniture firm Laval to do the furniture’s hand detailing.   How does that combination of Japanese-Chinese-France work?  It’s very interesting. It’s a unique combination. Everything is different, even the way we work and the way we talk. Every day we have a new surprise—mostly positive surprises. We are learning about each other and learning from China. The French factory is smaller than the Shanghai factory and can only be open for 35 hours a week, whereas the Shanghai factory can be open for double that because the people are very young and very willing to work. Obviously, the two cultures are very different. We like to say that we are made in Shanghai rather than made in China. We enjoy the city here and the nice living environment. Typically, strong design movements come out of very strong economies and Shanghai has a strong economic background. As we get more and more design requests we can support the improvement of local manufacturers and challenge new designers.  Overall, we have noticed a lack of Chinese design at major furniture fairs, even as the Chinese market has grown. Do you agree with that or are we looking in the wrong places? I think China is still more hardware than software. China is the factory of the world; they are producing everything and exporting everything. So the challenge for China is that they are so focused on manufacturing design rather than creating it. I definitely don’t think that is bad, but it makes it more difficult for design development. But, China is booming and growing so sooner or later it is going to happen.
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Fig + Pico

New hotel towers revealed for L.A.’s booming South Park neighborhood
San Francisco–based Gensler and New York and Toronto-based Yabu Pushelberg have released renderings for the Fig + Pico development, the latest set of towers for Los Angeles’s rapidly transforming South Park neighborhood. New York-based real estate firm Lightstone Group is working on the latest scheme for the city’s entertainment district, which encompass a grouping of towers on a 1.22-acre site directly across from the Los Angeles Convention Center and rising on the same block as the Harley Ellis Devereaux-designed Circa project, which is made up of a pair of elliptical, 38-story residential towers containing 648 units. Urbanize.LA reports that according to an initial study released by the Department of City Planning, the Fig + Pico project would encompass trio of mixed-use hotel projects, with two of those hotels co-located within a 42-story tower containing a combined 820 rooms. The third hotel will be located in a 25-story tower adjacent to the tallest mass and will contain 342 rooms. Preliminary renderings contained within that report show a cluster of rectilinear, glass-clad monoliths sprouting from a mid-rise podium structure. All three towers are supported by slender, super-tall columns and are alternately oriented toward the south and west. The podium structure for the two taller masses has been designed to contain 11,000 square feet of ground floor retail spaces, as well as rooftop pool decks, conference areas, and a 353-stall parking structure while the third tower will contain 2,100 square feet of retail space among other programs. The project represents the latest addition to the city’s projected skyline, which according to proposed and currently-under-construction projects, will be steadily marching southward from the new AC Martin-designed Wilshire Grand tower toward Interstate 10 over the next few years. Just last week, Skidmore Owings & Merrill and P-A-T-T-E-R-N-S revealed designs for a crop of residential high-rise towers. Like many of the adjacent residential and hotel projects, Fig + Pico is expected to have, per the developer’s request, illuminated signage along the retail podium levels for advertising and possibly, digital public art installations, as well. Pending city approval, the project is due to break ground in late 2017 or early 2018 and will be completed by 2022.
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UUfie Transforms Flagship Store With Icy Cool Glass Block

From Functional to Fashionable: glass blocks used to create a glowing facade in Shanghai.

Located in a high-end fashion district in Shanghai, this storefront was dramatically reclad in a custom glass block assembly by Toronto-based architecture studio UUfie. The facade is part of an adaptive reuse project, converting an old office building into a new flagship store for fashion house Ports 1961. Eiri Ota, the Director and Principal Architect of UUfie, says the design concept evokes the idea of a landform that resembles an iceberg floating freely in the ocean, “During the day, [the facade] mutes the surroundings, while subtly reflecting the sunlight. In the evening, the view is icy and crisp, and the surface illuminates with embedded LED lights integrated into the joints of the masonry.” The iceberg concept is inspired in part by the fashion brand’s celebration of the spirit of travel. The facade is composed of two types of glass blocks, a standard 12” (300mm) square block and a custom mitered block of the same dimensions. The use of corner blocks offers a seamless uninterrupted materiality. From a distance a larger grid emerges, registering the facade control joints and steel frame beyond. The grid acts as an organizing element for the building envelope, controlling the limits of the material while providing a basis for formal adjustments to the massing of the facade. At key moments, the building face pulls and pushes, establishing the main pedestrian entry and billboard displays for passersby. Ota relates these design moves to the building’s context, “the building has a sense of being undulated, expanding and contracting, as if it is shaped by its environment.”
  • Facade Manufacturer J. Gartner & Co. (HK) Ltd.
  • Architects UUfie (Design Architect)
  • Facade Installer J. Gartner & Co. (HK) Ltd.
  • Facade Consultants T/E/S/S atelier d’ingénierie (facade engineer); Inverse (lighting consultant); eightsixthree Ltd (project coordinator); Yabu Pushelberg (design producer)
  • Location Shanghai, China
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System Glass block on steel frame assembly with integrated LED lighting
  • Products 300mm x 300mm glass block, 300mm x 300mm custom corner glass block
UUfie was able to achieve a three-dimensional “corbeling” look for the glass block by carefully integrating steel plates into the design. As the facade tapers, the blocks rest on a stainless steel plate of the same dimension, which extends to a steel frame. LED lighting, inserted into the masonry joints casts light toward the interior, which is indirectly reflected back to the exterior, establishing a soft glow effect and conveying the depth of the assembly. UUfie’s Toronto-base office worked to refine the detailing of the wall system to ensure that the on-site assembly process would operate as smoothly as possible, which meant condensing the number of connections in the modular assembly down to a set of standard details. This effort doubly helped to establish a rigorously refined aesthetic and efficient construction process, reflecting Ports 1961’s approach to carefully honed craft production. The finishes selected for the facade were a thoughtful addition to the project. The glass block is a satin finish, and the underside of the exposed steel plates is shot blasted to create a soft matte finish. These deliberately “soft” finishes operate contextually to contrast with Shanghai’s electric chaos. Ota attributes the success of the project to the facade’s materiality and formal massing: “The differing geometries and changing perspectives of the facade express the transformative nature of the city and the people of Shanghai.”
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Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Bronze The Waldorf Astoria Beijing

Bronze facade is inspired by Chinese historic architecture.

In designing the facade of the new Waldorf Astoria Beijing, Chicago-based Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture (AS+GG) set out to create a contemporary expression that maintained a relationship to the city’s historic context. The project, after all, is within walking distance of the Forbidden City and many of the Chinese capitol’s famous Hutongs. “How do we make the experience of going to a hotel special and what about it would be Chinese?” enquired founding partner Gordon Gill. “From an experience standpoint, what about the wall could change your experience in your room?” The answer was a bronze facade with a bay window system that protrudes out from the face of the building.
  • Facade Manufacturer Yuanda Exterior Wall Manufacturer
  • Architects Adrian Smith + Gordon Gill Architecture
  • Facade Installer Yuanda Exterior Wall Manufacturer
  • Facade Consultant Lerch Bates
  • Location Beijing, China
  • Date of Completion 2014
  • System bronze panels with modular bay windows and solar shading
  • Products bronze, low-iron glass
The bay windows are not uniform, however, but tuned to differing angles and orientations to frame particular views. This makes the whole building “like a compound eye,” according to Gill. Working in co-ordination with Toronto-based Yabu Pushelberg, the interior architects, the team developed a modular system based on the size of the rooms and the dimensions of the structural bays. It led to a cleaner design that was easier to construct. While the texture created by the bay window system is ornamental and connected to the context, it also provides solar shading. Shade provided by horizontal glass fins above the recessed vertical windows allowed the architects to use very clear low-iron glass to give the best views possible. “It is not tainted by a tint or a color in any way. There is a low-e coating on the glass, but it’s a low-level so it’s not reflective on the inside,” said Gill. The architects developed the bronze details, and the client initially liked it. The designers were excited, but nervous about it actually happening. Gill explained, “We went back to the chairman a few weeks later for the presentation, and he came back and said ‘Well I want you to know that I had lunch with the mayor and I told him that this building was going to be bronze, and he loved it, so now we have to do it.’ So it was just a matter of detailing out.” Metal panels can present technical challenges, especially catalytic failure between the z-clips and the metal panels, including rusting, corrosion, or telegraphing through the panel. The design team mitigated these problems, so the main challenge was to get the color right. Bronze is not a typical material, so they had to rely on their own blend of copper, nickel, and brass to achieve a warm, golden color that was not too yellow, red, or brown, but somewhere in between. There is variation from panel to panel—an unpredictability that adds to the texture and richness of the facade. The unusual material was inspired by two large bronze pots at a nearby historic hospital building, which the client had referenced. This decision exemplifies the ethos of the building, which was to capture the elegance and quality of Waldorf Astoria’s brand in contemporary yet contextually sensitive building. It has come to serve as an example to luxury hoteliers around the world.    
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A Murmuration of Starlings
Olson Kundig's design for the 38 Beams VIP lounge.
Courtesy Olson Kundig

Art Basel Miami Beach/Design Miami
December 3-6, 2014
Miami and Miami Beach, Florida

The Miami Art/Design Fair week starts quietly with a murmuration of starlings, a blob-like cluster of birds flying in perfect formation while re-morphing, changing shape, and moving up and down the horizon, but retaining their amorphous sense of unity throughout the aerial dance. I am stuck in traffic, trying to reach the first of many events, when just as suddenly the birds vanish. The moment of unexpected natural beauty will resonate throughout the week as a revelatory message of sorts. I only have to figure out what it means.

The week begins at 4:00 p.m. with a tour of the newly refurbished Design District with developer Craig Robins and Mathieu Le Bozec of L Real Estate (an LVMH subsidiary). With all the millions flowing in, Robins has managed to skip several stages of gentrification and go straight to platinum luxury utopia. More than a hundred luxury brands are either already open or will soon be open, including Bulgari, Cartier, Louis Vuitton, Pucci, Versace, Dior, Givenchy, Dolce & Gabbana, Hermès, Tom Ford, etc. One looks for the grand architectural gesture and finds instead a high-end shopping mall, a protected urban space fortified with luxury brand logos and a variety of surface treatments. Much of the effect is just that, special effects, well-placed claddings, wrappings, and graftings, a kind of architectonic nipping and tucking that employs reflective glass, mottled surfaces, and theatrical lighting to achieve the desired suspension of disbelief. Will it be an effective enough illusion to lure zillionaire shoppers from the lush comforts of Bal Harbour Shops and the other high-end venues of South Florida? Without them, the heady rise of the Design District may turn into an equally precipitous decline. The new Palm Court creates a conspicuously fortified enclosure to protect Manolo Blahnik–wearing shoppers from accidentally bumping into urine-scented street folk, but the plaza is semi-public, open on the north and west to pedestrian traffic, and soon there will be an outdoor cafe on the second level and a handsome cast-concrete public events space designed by Aranda/Lasch to help lure non-shoppers deeper into the complex.

 
Fuller's Fly's Eye Dome in the Miami Design District.
Courtesy Alastair Gordon
 

Some of the unfinished buildings have been draped with translucent mesh veils that give them a mysterious, burka-like presence. There’s also an element of folding and pleating going on in some of the facades. The Aranda/Lasch building is clad in cast concrete slabs with patterned imprints that mimic a kind of embroidery. The two-story arcade of narrow glass fins by Japanese architect Sou Fujimoto reads as a lattice of chilly blue icicles. It may help to break the ferocity of the Miami sun while framing the shops along the southern side of the Palm Court, but its engineering seems fussy and needlessly overwrought.

The district is desperately in need of more parking, as is all of Miami, and the origami-like folds of Leong Leong’s unfinished multi-level garage on North Miami Avenue are best seen from the elevated perspective of I-195 as blue-and-white metallic membranes appear to crinkle from side to side as one drives by at 70 miles per hour.

The Design District’s star attraction, however, is Buckminster Fuller’s Fly’s Eye dome that dropped like an alien intruder into the very heart of the complex. It’s a digitally re-engineered version of the original 24-foot-diameter Fly’s Eye that was fabricated in 1979 by John Warren and is now installed on the western deck of the Pérez Art Museum Miami, two miles to the south. The new version was built by Daniel Reiser to meet local codes, and has already become the symbolic centerpiece of the entire Design District, upstaging all of the architecture that surrounds it.

 
Design Miami entry pavilion.
Courtesy Alastair Gordon
 

I arrive late at the opening reception for the Edition, the renovated former Seville Hotel, pushing past tall thin models in black lycra mesh who stand guard with transparent clipboards as shields, like the “Hounds of Hell,” as one rumpled writer suggests. Ian Schrager concocted the refurbished hybrid hotel in tandem with Arne Sorenson of the Marriott. John Pawson is project architect and interiors are by Yabu Pushelberg with black walnut veneers and sandy shades of beige with creamy pale undertones. We sit in the Matador Room and listen to Shrager and Sorenson compliment one another and explain how they had created the highest-end luxury boutique hotel on Miami Beach, comparing their efforts most humbly to the corporate branding of Apple. The original Seville Hotel (1955) was designed by Melvin Grossman, protégé of Morris Lapidus, and the new owners want to keep its rat-pack elegance intact while smoothing and slimming it down. The Edition/Seville holds its own against the Fontainebleau and Eden Roc and only lacks the kind of money-shot moment that Lapidus was so good at choreographing. Grossman outdid his mentor when it came to an outdoor circular bar and a multi-level diving platform, both of which have been lovingly restored along with the oversized chandeliers and gold mosaic columns in the lobby.

   
Jeanne Gang's Thinning Ice installation.
Courtesy Alastair Gordon
 

Design Miami opens for previews on Tuesday and at last acknowledges the environment in three curated shows within the main exhibition pavilion. For Swarovski, Jeanne Gang offers Thinning Ice, an ingenious interpretation of melting polar ice caps with white enameled icebergs rising from a reflective floor laced with rivers of melted ice (tiny Swarovski crystals) flowing through narrow fiber-optic streams.

Perrier-Jouët’s Ephemera by Katharina Mischer and Thomas Traxler is a mechanical ornamental garden that rises and falls in response to human movements around a large oak table, a sweetly melancholic reminder of man’s love-hate co-dependency with nature. Olson Kundig Architects have delivered the finest gesture of the show with their lounge installation called 38 Beams, bringing a muscular Northwestern vibe to Miami’s often-ephemeral sub-tropical environment. It’s a kind of Lincoln Logs stacking of horizontal beams that allows for visual and atmospheric penetration from the main hall so that VIPs won’t feel so lonely and removed while sitting within, sipping glasses of Perrier-Jouët. The massive beams, measuring about 15 inches by 30 inches and 30 feet long, were recycled by Olson Kundig from an old industrial building in Los Angeles, refurbished, flame-proofed and then lightly sanded.

Fuller's Fly's Eye Dome in the Miami Design District.
Courtesy Design Miami
 

On Thursday morning I am obliged to moderate a fractious panel on the theme of “The Future of Design” with furniture diva Patrizia Moroso, Italian architect/designer Piero Lissoni, and Israeli-Brit enfant terrible Ron Arad, who speaks about his remodel of the Watergate building in Washington, DC. In addition to making architectural changes, Arad has designed everything from furniture to napkins and stationary with a font based on shredded documents from the Watergate hearings. He also broke up the program by presenting a new prototype based on a funky old mattress that he’d spotted on the street near his London studio. The mattress lay up against a wall, bent in half, deformed, reeking of malodorous human indignities, but he became obsessed with it, nonetheless, taking photographs, making sketches and somehow transforming it from trash into an elegant low-impact couch that he named “Matrizia” in honor of Patrizia Moroso who laughed and, on the spot, agreed to put it into production in her family’s 62-year-old factory based in Udine, Italy. A design critic from England pointed out that while most designers see a problem and attempt to come up with a solution, Arad sees a problem and creates more problems.

Friday morning, the wind whips off Biscayne Bay, seeming to pick up velocity as it caroms off buildings and spills down onto the site of this morning’s official groundbreaking ceremony for One Thousand Museum, the bone-like, 62-story tower designed by Zaha Hadid. A temporary wall of trees tips over and spreads dirt over the carpeting. Tables collapse, champagne glasses shatter. Waiters try to contain the damage. Valet parking attendants and security personnel scatter and then regroup as Hadid herself arrives, an hour late, entering the throng like a rock star, a royal personage, a diva who now finds herself surrounded by crazed fans pushing their iPhones into her face and inching closer to get a shot of the architect, now looking somewhat embarrassed, now growing concerned for her own safety as a Miami-Dade cop pushes into the mob and goes to her rescue.

There’s a champagne brunch on the beach, an immersive video event, a plastic pollution installation in Wynwood, the Peter Marino show at the Bass Museum of Art, a Prouvé demountable house at the Delano that I still haven’t seen but I give up after sitting in cross-bay traffic and finally abandon my car by the side of the road and start to cross the Venetian Causeway by foot. Protests have broken out in reaction to the Eric Garner grand jury on Staten Island. Roads are blocked and conditions escalate when news gets out about a similar case of police brutality in Miami itself: Delbert Rodriguez Gutierrez, a 21-year-old street artist otherwise known as “Demz,” was run over by a squad car this morning when the cops spotted him “tagging” a private building near 24th Street and gave chase. Gutierrez died soon after.

The crowds are swelling even further, tempers flaring, momentum building as the mob moves outward and expands into a single body with a single mind: “I can’t breathe!” they chant, holding up their hands, “I can’t breathe!” echoing Garner’s dying words. The protesters march onto I-195, shutting down the highway and blocking the Julia Tuttle Causeway, a prime connector between mainland and beach, between art fairs and design shows, disrupting the to and fro, the art world gossip, the backroom deals and interviews and celebrity clusterfucks, VIP red carpets, vacuous panel discussions. Suddenly the entire Art Basel Bubble bursts with the loud refrain: “I can’t breathe!” and there is nothing left but an urge to file this report as quickly as I can. But I feel pressed to relate the ending back to the beginning—as a proper story should: The starlings rose up in their murmuration on Monday afternoon and appeared to be telling me something that I couldn’t understand. I am still at a loss for words.

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Product> The Comprehensive New York Design Week 2013 Roundup
New York's inaugural design week, held from May 10 through 21, was a comprehensive, two-week celebration of all things design across Manhattan island, as well as parts of Brooklyn. Showcasing the latest from industry stalwarts to emerging and independent designers—local, domestic, and international—AN culled its top picks of New York Design Week products from the ICFF show floor, Wanted Design exhibitions, showroom launches, and all events in between.  The Low Collection 13&9 Design The multidisciplinary Austrian design studio debuted at Wanted Design with a collection of furniture, wearable fashion and accessories, a cinematic video, and a music album. With the Low Collection (pictured above), Corian is formed into several seating styles that combine with storage vessels, all at ground level. Suitable for outdoors, furniture heights can be modified to generate a unique landscape. Cartesian Chair Alexander Purcell Rodrigues Named for Descartes's coordinate system, the Cartesian chair is made from aircraft-grade aluminum with an anodized finish for extreme durability. Mathematically generated, subtle texture on the back is realized via parametric design tools. Stool 60 Special Editions Artek Originally designed by Alvar Aalto in 1933, Artek celebrates 80 years of production with special updates by guest designers including Mike Meiré, Tom Dixon, Commes des Garcons, Mads Norgaard, and Nao Tamura. Special Edition by Brooklyn-based designer Tamura features screen-printed tree rings directly onto the seat to unify the lifespan of a tree with the longevity of Stool 60. Regent Street Mirror Avenue Road Debuting its second collection with Avenue Road, Yabu Pushelberg launched seven new pieces with its production partner for 2013. Regent Street is a full length dressing mirror with a functional, glass-topped shelf, supported by a polished nickel frame. Minikitchen Boffi Made from Corian with a solid teak chopping board, Boffi's mobile, outdoor kitchen unit can be repositioned easily on swiveling castors. It also features space for a mini-refrigerator, small cutlery drawers, electrical appliance sockets, and a pull-out worktop. Maharam Shell Chair Project Carl Hansen Carl Hansen has collaborated with Maharam textiles on the Maharam Shell Chair Project to celebrate the 50th anniversary of CH07's design. For this special collection, 20 of Wegner's Shell Chairs will feature a range of re-edition designs from Wiener Werksẗatte and Alexander Girard, as well as collaborations with Hella Jongerius and Paul Smith. Tuareg Foscarini The frame of Ferruccio Laviani's Tuareg floor lamp is marked by three metal tubes that house fully adjustable LED light sources. At 82 inches in height and 50 inches in width, it is available in Orange and Black. Curl Luceplan Industrial designer Sebastian Bergne designed Curl with adjustable white, LED technology which allows users to change the light temperature quickly and easily. And with no established base, the fixture can be set in any position for endless configurations of ambient light. Pleat Box Marset Featured in the "Design: Istanbul–Turkey" showcase at Wanted Design, the Pleat Box lighting pendant is designed by Mashallah Design in collaboration with Barcelona ceramicist Xavier Mañosa. Recycling various enamels produces a white ceramic, brown, black, terracotta or gray exterior and is finished with a glossy white or gold interior. Røros Tweed Blanket Snøhetta Debuting this spring, Mountainfold, Color Noise, and Islandskap are Snøhetta-conceived patterns on Norwegian-manufactured Røros Tweed. On Mountainfold, the design was derived from the famous mountain peak in Dovre, Norway (and the firm's namesake), and is available in six colorways. Heze Trove Geometric, circular patterns are rendered in blurred strokes on wood veneer, matte foil wallpaper, PVC-free Type II Redeux, embossed Type II Marquee, or in bamboo and rice textures for windows. A 12-foot by 67-inch panel shows no vertical repeats. Exquisite Wink Wolf-Gordon For its booth at ICFF, Wolf-Gordon commissioned 10 leading designers and artists to demonstrate the benefits of Wink, a clear, dry-erase coating that can be applied to any smooth surface. Featured sketches and designs in the "Exquisite" installation came from Snarkitecture, Ali Tayar, karlssonwilker, Michael Graves, Boym Partners, Myles Karr, and Ben Katchor.
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Stalled Residential Tower in Lower Manhattan to Rise Next to Woolworth Building
A giant residential skyscraper is slated to join Manhattan’s skyline— rising more than 130 feet above its neighbor, the Woolworth Building.  Developer Silverstein Properties announced today that $950 million in funding has been secured to move forward with the construction of the Robert A.M. Stern Architects-designed tower at 30 Park Place in Lower Manhattan. This massive building will climb up to 82-stories—making it the tallest residential tower in Downtown Manhattan according to a recent statement—and will include a 185-room Four Seasons hotel, 157 Four Seasons luxury residences, and a public plaza. Yabu Pushelberg, the design firm behind a slew of W and Four Season Hotels, will design the interiors for this project. Silverstein Properties anticipates that the they will break ground by Fall 2013 and complete the 926-feet tower by 2016.
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Building Images

Photography’s power to shape the experience of architecture goes on display at the Parrish Museum
Buildings have been reliable photography subjects since the medium’s invention, and a new exhibition at the Parrish Art Museum in Southampton, New York, tracks how architectural photography sells a narrative as much as the buildings themselves. Through careful selection by guest curator Therese Lichtenstein, Image Building: How Photography Transforms Architecture examines how architectural photography inherently creates subjective experiences. From now until June 17, 2018, patrons can view 57 images by 17 renowned and lesser-known photographers who shaped a language of architectural photography that’s survived well into the age of Instagram. Organized thematically intro three sections, Cityscapes, Domestic Spaces, and Public Places, Image Building places historical photographs alongside contemporary images to track an evolution in style, technique, and places themselves. Modernism has proven an especially rich vein for these comparisons. Image Building places Julius Shulman’s carefully staged Case Study House photos against images of quotidian features from cookie-cutter, low-income housing. Each series is trying to sell something, whether it be an idealized life of post-war leisure, or commentary on the alienation that mass-produced housing induces. This dichotomy is on display throughout the exhibition, and hammers home the heightened artificiality of architectural photography. Buildings are three-dimensional structures and flattening them hands the narrative over to the photographer. For instance, Hiroshi Sugimoto’s fragile, out-of-focus takes on famously photographed architectural landmarks are a commentary on their now-lessened status in the world, having been sidelined and (literally) overshadowed in the years since their construction. But this series serves another purpose, as it highlights how vital the technical aspects–light, depth of field, the use of color–are to each photograph's meaning. Take Iwan Baan’s delirious photos of Torre de David in Caracas, Venezuela. Devoid of people, but featuring the scattered items they’ve left behind, Baan captures the chaotic energy present in the half-finished Torre de David skyscraper, now overrun with squatters, from the perspective of its inhabitants. Looking at The City and the Storm, Baan’s aerial photo of a Manhattan plunged into darkness following Hurricane Sandy, Baan singles out what he calls the “electricity haves and have-nots,” as viewers are drawn to the centers of finance that serve as islands of light in a darkened city. The Parrish Art Museum, designed by Herzog & de Meuron and shaped like an extruded “M,” built from simple materials and completed in 2012, played an important part in the foundation of Image Building. As Lichtenstein told AN, the Parrish itself was partly the inspiration for the show. The way it was sited, the photographs that Baan took of the building, and the long, uninterrupted views down the museum’s “wings” all stoked questions of how photography proliferates the ideas behind the buildings themselves. As it becomes easier and easier to proliferate images of buildings, looking back to the history of the form may provide an important tool for the professional and amateur architectural photographer alike. On Saturday, April 14 2018 at 5:00 PM, the Parrish Museum will host a dialogue between The Architect's Newspaper's Editor in Chief William Menking and photographer Iwan Baan on the use of photography to instill buildings with feeling and meaning. More information on the talk can be found here.